Homemade Modge Podge Decoupage Glue Recipe

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4 (80%) 25 vote[s]

Make your own decoupage glue with 2 very simple basic ingredients for a mere fraction of the cost of the name brand product, plus learn the difference of when you should use homemade Modge Podge and when you should splurge on the real thing!

homemade-modge-podge-decoupage-glue-recipe

To Make Your Own (Regular):

3/4 c. Elmers White Glue (no other brand, NOT washable kind)
1/4 c. Water

Mix them together until they are completely incorporated and use as you would any store-bought modge podge decoupage product. An old washed out vitamin bottle works Great for mixing and storing homemade modge podge!

You’ll find recipes online that call for equal parts of glue and water, but I’ve found that once you use this, after about 3 months, the project “Yellows” and becomes brittle, so I don’t recommend that mixture at all.

How to Make Your Own Waterproof Gloss Finish Modge Podge

  • 1 Bottle of Waterproof Glue such as Titebond, Bondloc PVA, Waterproof Wood Glue, etc
  • Water
  • Small Jar

Fill the jar halfway with the glue. The amount of water that you add to this is entirely dependent on the material that you intend to decoupage.

Thin Paper: Add enough water to give it a milky consistency.

Thick Paper: 20-24lb such as magazine pages, book pages, some types of wallpaper- add enough water to turn the consistency similar to yogurt.

What’s the Difference?

Homemade works wonderful for the kids’ art projects- it creates a matte finish and leaves the colors completely unchanged whereas real modge podge will add a colorful vibrant luster to your projects and make them “POP” while also remaining supple and flexible.

Homemade Podge:

  • Drys clear, practically invisible due to Matte Finish
  • No Body, No Brush Strokes
  • Thin
  • Gives the appearance of a “Glued On” when applied
  • Will eventually crack, yellow or peel
  • can be made for less than 50¢

Real Podge:

  • Thicker
  • More Body
  • Glossy Sheen
  • Vibrant colors that Pop
  • Blends the object being decoupaged INTO the project
  • Contains a Sealer that prevents yellowing, cracking, peeling, etc
  • Costs a few dollars a bottle

The Verdict:

If the project is for a gift or for long term enjoyment, use the real thing. If you’re simply keeping the kids entertained for an afternoon of crafts or creating a short term decoration, use the homemade stuff.

THIS POST MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS. FULL DISCLOSURE HERE
About Liss 4006 Articles
Melissa Burnell, known to her friends and fans as "Liss," grew up in Southern Maine, now residing in sunny South Carolina. As a busy Wife, Mother of two sons, an avid photographer, and self-employed entrepreneur, Liss understands the value of both time and money.

9 Comments

  1. i like that the author gives us the additional tips on “the difference in the products and the verdict”. i am not familiar with the mod podge. :worthy:

  2. i have used this for years and it is great – but as said if it needs to stand up to hard wear and tear beast to use proper stuff xx

  3. i made my own podge glue with 2 parts white glue and 1 part water BUT I also put in 2 tablespoons of varnish. It gives that shine and ”hardness” plus it doesnt go yellow. Try it :party1:

  4. thanks for the yellowing tip. was wondering if i could use this on wallpaper scraps for the front of an old chest. guess the best would be real in this case.

  5. i am wondering if you spray or paint your project with a glossy coat or transparent paint, will it prevent it from coloring and cracking?

    for some projects, i want the yellowing and cracking. like maps on dresser tops then a nice piece of glass over top. i’d like they coloring and antique look.

  6. i do plaques and the like for people and have used the homemade version long ago and only recently did the modge podge. the branded stuff does shine more at first but have noticed it dulls as well in time – nothing is perfect.

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