Easter Egg Dye Guide-Perfect Colors Everytime

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We celebrate Spring in a big way! One of those ways is dyeing Easter eggs with our littles! Last year we discovered an awesome color chart and video tutorial showing how to get vibrant colors easily and it worked wonders for making this fun project a little easier on the wife and I . . .

In order to achieve various designs you can use rubberbands, white crayons (any place marked on the egg will not dye), the perfect size dipping container is a wide mouth pint mason jar or these clear 9-ounce plastic cups.

easter-egg-dye-guide-perfect-colors-everytime

Image Credit: McCormick

Here’s a video Guide on creating on your unique colors

We prefer McCormick food coloring for this project as the colors are more vibrant and require less product to achieve the correct color we want, which in my book is a savings! Nothing says frustrating like trying to explain to your four year old daughter why her egg doesn’t match the color in the picture that she picked out because your food coloring was off. (I played that game once!)

To make your own Easter Egg Dye you’ll need:

1/2 cup of hot water
1 tsp vinegar
food coloring

In a small shallow container measure the vinegar, add the dye drops and gently pour in the hot water.

Here’s a simple trick to ensure you’re using the right temperature water- run a pot of water through your coffee pot, it becomes the perfect temperature! To avoid any potential burns let the dye cool to a tepid temperature before allowing the children to dip their eggs.

These color combinations are from McCormick! You can also use white crayons or even a piece of candle wax to draw designs on the egg before coloring them and then whatever design you draw will be etched onto the egg.

easter-egg-dye-guide-perfect-colors-everytime

Image Credit: McCormick


More Egg-Dyeing Tricks

Dyeing eggs with very small children can be tricky, sometimes the egg drops into the dye from heights that cause it to spray several feet. We recommend giving kids one egg at a time to dye.

If your children are very small or have difficulties with balancing an egg on a spoon, gently spread the bottom of a cheap whisk (Dollar-store whisks are PERFECT for this), then slip the egg inside. The child can dip the egg without getting dye on themselves.

Place several layers of newspaper or paper towels underneath a cooling rack to place wet eggs on to dry.

To remove dye from hands/skin, lightly wet the stained area with plain white vinegar, sprinkle with baking soda, rub vigorously, apply soap, lather, rinse well.

I’d love to hear other ideas for decorating Easter eggs or to see photographs of your kids beautiful creations!

THIS POST MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS. FULL DISCLOSURE HERE

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