How to Grow a Mango Tree

How to Grow a Mango Tree
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Mangoes are a wonderfully simple plant to grow and very easy to get a seed. The next time you purchase a mango at the grocery store, save the pod, remove the seed and plant it, here’s how…
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Once you’ve eaten your mango, you’re left with a rather large pod that looks like this:

how-to-grow-a-mango-tree

Remove as much of the Mango flesh as you can from the seed pit. Although many sites state that you need to dry the seed out first, I’ve never been one to have a lot of patience (or time, for that matter). So rather than wait, slip a knife very carefully into the edge of the bearded side of the mango pit.

how-to-grow-a-mango-tree

Be very careful not to pierce deeply into the pit as you only want to break the seal of the pod, you do NOT want to cut the seed itself.

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Using your fingers, slip your thumb in between the pod shell and gently pry it apart, revealing the mango seed nestled safely inside.

how-to-grow-a-mango-tree
how-to-grow-a-mango-tree

Remove the seed from the pod. You may notice a string running from the pod to the seed, this is the seeds “umbilical cord”, if you will. You can remove that.

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Plant the seed in well-drained soil. Some people prefer to germinate the seed first using wet paper towels, but in the past, I’ve noticed this only has a 25% success rate, with mold usually taking over. Instead, place the seed directly into some potting soil, water it well and then keep it moist, but not soaked.

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It will sprout of its own accord within a couple of weeks.

how-to-grow-a-mango-tree

How long before it fruits?

Mango trees can fruit within 7-10 years and can be grafted once the plant is over a foot tall with 1/4″ thick branches if you want multiple plants faster. They produce well in hot dry areas but be forewarned a mango tree has the ability to grow 30-100 feet tall, so at some point, you’ll need to transplant your baby outside in a warm spot.

You can keep it indoors in a large pot, at least 2 feet deep as mangoes grow taproots, it will still produce fruit even when rootbound, unlike some plants.

See Also:

Mango Frozen Yogurt

About Liss 4018 Articles
Melissa Burnell, known to her friends and fans as "Liss," grew up in Southern Maine, now residing in sunny South Carolina. As a busy Wife, Mother of two sons, an avid photographer, and self-employed entrepreneur, Liss understands the value of both time and money.

18 Comments

  1. growing a mango tree is even easier than stated above. you don’t have to remove the seed form the pod at all. throw the whole hairy thing (pod) in a plastic cup or other container.

    add a tad of water in the bottom (keep an eye on the water over time and replenish when necessary).

    in a couple of weeks or so, the little nascent mango tree will push its skinny green tendril out of the pod seeking the water. i knew nothing of growing mangoes and did this. it worked!

    then transplant the mango into soil. ta da!

    • Growing a mango tree is even easier than stated above. You don’t have to remove the seed form the pod at all. Throw the whole hairy thing (pod) in a plastic cup or other container.

      Add a tad of water in the bottom (keep an eye on the water over time and replenish when necessary).

      In a couple of weeks or so, the little nascent mango tree will push its skinny green tendril out of the pod seeking the water. I knew nothing of growing mangoes and did this. It worked!

      Then transplant the mango into soil. Ta da!

      I disagree, if you did get “one” to sprout from inside the hull, you were incredibly lucky. The hull needs to be removed in order for the root system & sprout to develop unstressed.

      • I disagree, if you did get “one” to sprout from inside the hull, you were incredibly lucky. The hull needs to be removed in order for the root system & sprout to develop unstressed.

        I had one to sprout inside the fruit, so I planted it and now have A little tree about 2feet tall, so I decided to plant another one and it grew also, I just don’t know what to do for the winter being they like warm weather

  2. great news! i love growing new plants and trees. once planted in the ground how do you protect them from the snowy winter?

  3. i am not very familiar with mangos. to me they look and act like a peach with the stone. in my area of the world, if you wanted to start one quickly you could use two methods.

    one was to throw the seed into a freezer for a day or two so that the seed would crack. second way was to use a hammer and “crack” the shell along its dividing halves. that takes a little skill but if you hold it in your fingers you can “feel” the seed crack.

    for peaches it works well– i don’t see why it will not for mangoes.

  4. i’m assuming this plant would have to be grown in a greenhouse in idaho! since my greenhouse is only 15 ft high, can I lop off the top as it approaches the ceiling? Could it handle being grown as a bush?

    Also, does it require a pollinator or are mangoes self-pollinating?

  5. i might add to this that the hull is really tough & hard to slip a knife in safely. i’ve found if you snip the edge with pruning shears or wire cutters (i broke a pair of scissors) you can pop it open pretty easy. though these are lovely plants & easy to grow, unless you live in a tropical climate or have a huge greenhouse, i wouldn’t count on them ever bearing fruit.

    still, much to grow & are beautiful around the patio in the warm months. also, different varieties produce different colored leaves.

  6. what growing zone do you live in? i live in northern ohio and i am thinking that it is just too cold here to grow something like this.

    • What growing zone do you live in? I live in northern Ohio and I am thinking that it is just too cold here to grow something like this.

      they are warm climate trees, I was wondering the same, I have 1 that sprouted on its on in the fruit now it is 2 inches tall, but I to have cold winters

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