How to easily remove biting ticks and prevent them from crawling on you in the first place! Dirt Cheap Tick Prevention

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  • Easy Tick Removal & Kid Safe Repellent

    Tick season has struck and those nasty little buggers are plaguing kids, pets and outdoor enthusiasts alike! Here is a simple, painless way to remove a biting tick- as well as prevent future ticks from climbing all over you!
    Remove ticks from Kids & Pets quickly, safely and Pain Free

    Ticks can transmit a number of painful, debilitating diseases including:


    1. Lyme Disease
    2. Tick Paralysis
    3. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
    4. (HA) Human Anaplasmosis
    5. Babesiosis
    6. Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness
    7. Ehrlichiosis
    8. Powassan Virus
    9. Tularemia
    10. Bourbon Virus Disease
    11. 364D Rickettsiosis
    12. Heartland Virus
    13. B Miyamotoi Infection
    14. Colorado Tick Fever
    15. Relapsing Fever
    16. Rickettsia Parkeri Rickettsiosis


    Recently there have been cases in which people have developed paralysis and even allergies to eating meat following a bite from a tick.

    That's the bad news, the Good news is- in order to get one of those illnesses, a tick must be feeding on its host for 24 hours, which means that you have nearly a full 24 hours to find and remove a tick before it can transmit one if it's nasties to you!

    BEST REMOVAL METHOD:

    Here is a simple, effective, yet painless way to remove an embedded tick from a pet, use a tick tornado tool. This simple tool allows you to quickly and painlessly remove the tick with the mouthparts fully intact without squeezing or touching the tick with your hands. It's the most effective method we've found to date and we use it on our own kids and pets.

    In fact, this is how I removed a tick from my grandpuppy's ear using the painless Tick Tornado:



    To successfully
    remove an attached tick it is imperative that you twist in one direction only. This helps ensure that the tick detaches with it's mouthparts intact, rather than breaking off into the skin which can cause a secondary infection.

    If you don't have the Tick Tornado, here is a last resort method for removing a tick:

    To Remove a tick:

    Grasp the tick firmly with a pair of tweezers as close to the head as you can, pull straight up using steady pressure, inspect the tick to ensure that all of the mouthparts are still attached to the tick and not embedded in the skin. Be sure to remove any parts still embedded using tweezers.

    How to properly remove a tick that's embedded in skin
    Image Credit: CDC.gov



    BAD METHODS - AVOID

    Here is a Method that is frequently shared on Social media that you should NOT USE to remove ticks:

    Trick for removing ticks quickly and painlessly from pets and kids
    Squirt a glob of liquid hand soap to a cotton ball, Cover the entire tick with the soaked cotton ball for a full 20 seconds. The tick will cease biting, back out and will remain stuck to the cotton ball when it's pulled
    away.


    This method has been shared stating that the ticks head is also removed and is not accidentally left in the skin, which commonly occurs when they are "yanked" out using tweezers. However, this method causes the tick to regurgitate the entire contents of its digestive tract into the skin of its host, thereby INCREASING the chance of contracting any diseases the tick may be carrying.

    Never attempt to use vaseline/petroleum jelly, peanut butter, nail polish, or hot matches to detach ticks as these methods cause them to regurgitate into their host, spreading disease and increasing the risk of infections. Ticks on breathe 3-15 breaths per HOUR, so suffocating them really isn't a viable option.

    Once the tick has been safely removed, wash the area thoroughly with rubbing alcohol, iodine or soap and water to clean the bitten area.


    Preserving the Tick for Testing

    If you are unsure of how long a tick has been embedded in your skin, place it in a jar in rubbing alcohol so that
    it can be tested for Lyme and/or other diseases.

    If you have a tick on your person and it is not yet biting, you can apply a piece of scotch tape to the tick, it will stick to it, fold the tape closed and throw it away. No need to burn it and have the nasty smell linger in your home, it won't be able to get free.

    To Prevent Ticks:


    Tick Repellant №1

    1 cup of water
    10 drops geranium essential oil
    5 drops cedarwood essential oil
    3 drops lavender essential oil
    3 drops lemongrass essential oil

    Add 1 cup of water to a small spray bottle, then add the essential oils. Seal tightly and shake gently to mix. Apply the spray to clothing, gear, skin, and footwear prior to going outdoors. This is a wonderful blend that we use while camping with great success. This blend is safe for dogs and kids alike.

    Tick Repellant №2

    1/2 cup white vinegar
    1/3 cup water
    20 drops eucalyptus essential oil
    20 drops lemongrass essential oil
    10 drops citronella essential oil
    10 drops lavender
    essential oil


    Combine water and vinegar in a small spray bottle, then add the essential oils. Seal tightly and shake gently to mix. Apply the spray to clothing, gear, skin, and footwear prior to going outdoors. This blend works wonderfully to discourage ticks and other biting pests.

    Other Effective Methods for Avoiding Ticks:

    • Wear light clothing
    • Fill a small Spritz bottle with water, add 40 drops of Tea Tree Essential Oil, shake and spray on liberally.
    • Apply a solution of 0.5% Permethrin on clothing or gear
    • Avoid wooded areas and shady grasslands, stay within marked trails and always inspect yourself, your children and your pets daily to detect and remove any ticks as soon as possible.


    Team Member Liss Budget101 Instagram Pinterest Facebook Twitter Youtube Google+ Budget101


    References:


    1. Sanson T. Tick-borne diseases. Medscape Drugs & Diseases from WebMD. Updated October 6, 2016. Available at: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/786652-overview. Accessed April 17, 2018.
    2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ticks: tickborne diseases abroad. Updated June 1, 2015. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/diseases/abroad.html.
      Accessed April 17, 2018.
    3. Moran D. 'Emerging' tick-borne virus found in Connecticut. Hartford Courant. April 10, 2015. Available at: http://www.courant.com/health/hc-eme...410-story.html. Accessed April 17, 2018.
    4. Baddour LM. Borrelia miyamotoi disease: an emerging tick-borne illness in the northeastern U.S. NEJM Journal Watch. June 8, 2015. Available at: http://www.jwatch.org/na38118/2015/0...-borne-illness. Accessed April 17, 2018.
    5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Heartland virus. Updated August 15, 2017. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dvbd/heartland/index.html. Accessed April 17, 2018.
    6. Rivas A. New tick-borne disease identified in Kansas man, kills him in 11 days. Medical Daily. February 22, 2015. Available at: http://www.medicaldaily.com/new-tick...11-days-323146.
      Accessed April 17, 2018.
    7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Bourbon virus. National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. Updated June 28, 2017. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dvbd/bourbon/index.html. Accessed April 17, 2018.
    8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tickborne diseases of the United States. Updated July 25, 2017. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/diseases/. Accessed April 17, 2018.

    © Can Stock Photo Inc. / Eraxion

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    Comments 14 Comments
    1. Ellen B's Avatar
      Ellen B -
      Does the tea tree oil work on pets as well. Is it safe for dogs and cats. Spraying them before outings sounds like a good idea if safe
    1. Dannette's Avatar
      Dannette -
      Tea Tree is toxic to cats and dogs!
    1. medamomma's Avatar
      medamomma -
      A very good to know tip. I will use it the next time I have a tick on me.
    1. Chessie A's Avatar
      Chessie A -
      Quote Originally Posted by Dannette View Post
      Tea Tree is toxic to cats and dogs!
      I did not know Tea Tree is toxic to cats and dogs! Thank you so much for sharing! We have house dogs and I am glad I found this.
    1. Donna-M's Avatar
      Donna-M -
      Thank you for the tip. You are so smart
    1. gll3081's Avatar
      gll3081 -
      Awesome! Good to know.
    1. Blurple's Avatar
      Blurple -
      Can you add other essential oils like lavender and eucalyptus to repel mosquitos too?
    1. bmc7759's Avatar
      bmc7759 -
      what can you use for dogs and cats then???
    1. xavalexa's Avatar
      xavalexa -
      bad idea, regarding using soap or doing anything else - you want the tick out ASAP - follow the CDC's recommendations: Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp tick as close to the skin's surface as possible. Pull upward w/steady even pressure. Don't twist or jerk; this can cause the mouth-parts to break off/remain imbedded. If this happens, remove mouth-parts w/tweezers. After removing tick, clean the bite area & your hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub, or soap & water.

      CDC - Tick Removal - Ticks
    1. macfamily's Avatar
      macfamily -
      Quote Originally Posted by bmc7759 View Post
      what can you use for dogs and cats then???
      I believe I read an article that says that you can use Essence of Rosemary Oil on animals... and on people!
    1. macfamily's Avatar
      macfamily -
      I think essence of rosemary is what's recommended for dogs and cats to repel ticks.
    1. KBroz's Avatar
      KBroz -
      Please note one should always contact the medical professional first as each person and pet are unique !!!
    1. Hepsiba2229's Avatar
      Hepsiba2229 -
      This soap method works like a charm! Also, the tea tree water works just as fantastic!

      The problem with the CDC's tick removal method is that most people yank the tick off without getting the head or all its parts...then you have a bigger issue because getting the head out easily is not always possible.

      Using the soap method is just as quick as going slow enough with a pair of tweezers and with the soap method, there is zero risk of any tick parts being left under the skin.

      This same method works with vaseline because both the soap and vaseline keep suffocate the tick; that is why it has to pull its head out. However, most people don't have vaseline just laying around, but many households, cabins and trailers have liquid hand soap quickly available.

      Great post!
    1. drea's Avatar
      drea -
      I made the tick repellent No1 that you shared in your post and the 6 of us used it over the past week while camping. I have to tell you that I was Utterly AMAZED that we did not have a SINGLE tick on us the entire time. It's the FIRST time I've ever camped and NOT gotten at least 1 tick on me. Thank you Budget101.
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