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    • #272047

      Since Brchbell was talking about this in another thread, I wanted to bring it here since I was asking her a bunch of questions. So…..

      When you started this, did you use a terra cotta pot with a hole, or some other pot type? Do you only place one seed in the pot, or more? Do you use a special soil, or just a soil/fertilizer mix?

      How often would you water it? I do apologize in advance, but as a “non-gardener” with a brown thumb, I don’t want to kill it before it even starts growing! 🙂

    • #418601

      @justicemsb 113610 wrote:

      Since Brchbell was talking about this in another thread, I wanted to bring it here since I was asking her a bunch of questions. So…..

      When you started this, did you use a terra cotta pot with a hole, or some other pot type? Do you only place one seed in the pot, or more? Do you use a special soil, or just a soil/fertilizer mix?

      How often would you water it? I do apologize in advance, but as a “non-gardener” with a brown thumb, I don’t want to kill it before it even starts growing! 🙂

      Hi! Sorry I missed this! This week has been totally crazy!

      Up and out the door by 5am and not getting home until after midnight! Thursday was our only day at home and it was snowing big huge flakes and we just decked out and enjoyed it and only did what we had to do.

      When I’ve done this while living in apartments I bought Terra Cotta pots and a bag of grow mix. I plant a couple seeds in each one and then pull one later on so I just have one in each pot. You should put them under a shop light for about a month until they get a pretty good size like you would use to set out in a garden and then you are ok to just set them in a sunny window.

      If you are where it gets really hot you might need to set them back just out of the window during the hot part of the day so they don’t get to hot. Once they get good size they are fairly easy to take care of. Just put your finger down in the soil mix and when it’s dry for the first inch or so water it.

      I use to water them once a week and would fill the sink up and set them in it so the pot would also soak up water and then I’d put them back into their dishes in the window.

      I found it takes about 2 months to get these really going good. I start new ones going after about 5 or 6 months so when the older plants get tired and worn out I have replacements. You can redo the garden mix by adding a cup of good compost into each pot.

      Get a good mix of leaf lettuces to grow so you can have a good variety.

      Hope this helps you get started!

      Cherlynn

    • #419202

      I’m planning on planting Veggies in my pots on my deck this year instead of flowers I have a garden out back but I thought this might look more interesting and of course there’s the added bonus of being able to eat it. I heard eggplant make a great potted plant as well as peppers and of course tomato.

    • #419264

      Thank you!!! I can’t wait to try this. Now, you said use a shop light.

      Is that a flourescent(sp) light, or one of those really strong bright lights my dh uses to work on the car at night. lol (sorry, it’s the only way i can describe it)

    • #419270

      @justicemsb 114836 wrote:

      Thank you!!! I can’t wait to try this. Now, you said use a shop light.

      Is that a flourescent(sp) light, or one of those really strong bright lights my dh uses to work on the car at night. lol (sorry, it’s the only way i can describe it)

      just a plain cheap florescent light. nothing fancy or to bright! no plant grow lights, ect.

      as they get to hot and dry the plants out real quick.

    • #419331

      Very cool! Thanks! I would love to grow some lettuce, tomatoes, etc in flower pots in the apartment, but I just have to have “Step-by-step” instructions.

      I’m just not very good with knowing how to handle plants. I tend to kill them. 🙁

    • #419384

      @rtebalt 114917 wrote:

      Very cool! Thanks! I would love to grow some lettuce, tomatoes, etc in flower pots in the apartment, but I just have to have “Step-by-step” instructions.

      I’m just not very good with knowing how to handle plants. I tend to kill them. 🙁

      Well I confess there are a lot of variables like what kind of pot and size you use. What kind of soil mix you use, ect. You can start a seed right in the pot or you can start it and then transplant it over.

      I usually use at least a 10″ or larger clay pot. that will support one head of lettuce or 4 to 6 carrots. You have to picture the full size carrot and space those tiny seeds accordingly.

      Baby carrots or short carrots work best. Tomatoes take a bigger container like a bucket or larger and you need to mix in extra composted manure in with it. tomatoes are heavy feeders! It is easier if you go buy a plant and start from that on tomatoes.

      also I forgot to tell you your bucket should have a drain holes in the bottom and a little gravel or something. It would be nice if you have a little patio or balcony to set the tomatoes out. I’ve never tried to grow them inside!

      When I lived in Japan and only had window sills to use I only did lettuces, baby carrots and radishes. But give me a balcony or patio and I can use larger containers and feel like I’m really gardening!

      Watering: Feel the top couple of inches of dirt. If it’s dry you need to water. If you have clay pots; fill a sink with water and set the pot down in it and let it soak around 10 minutes.

      That will water the plant and the pot also. Make sure you have containers under all your inside plants to hold excess water.

      I’m not at home this week so pulling all this from my memory. Sure hope I remembered everything! Good luck!

      You’ll do fine I’m sure! Have fun growing & experimenting!

      Cherlynn
      Enjoying the Florida panhandle this week!

    • #419525

      OK I have a stupid question. When the lettuce seems mature, do you just trim off what you want to use for that meal and does it continue to grow back? Or is it once you finish it, let’s say a week, then it is dead, so you should have several going all the time??

      There are 2 of us and normally eat salads once a day. So would one of each kind be fine? Too much or not enough?

      Or did you just have one of each kind, that provided food for a few months, then when you could visually see that the plant was tiring (5-6 months) you started another.

      Also, do you store the seeds in the freezer until you use them all? If so, how long do they last (packets normally say 1 year).

    • #419535

      I have a small garden but I plan on doing some veggies in pots this year as well. Thanks for all the detail brchbell it sure helps! I think I’ll do some lettuce and some pepper plants and maybe a cherry tomato plant

    • #419538

      @jkpjohnson 115312 wrote:

      ok i have a stupid question. when the lettuce seems mature, do you just trim off what you want to use for that meal and does it continue to grow back? or is it once you finish it, let’s say a week, then it is dead, so you should have several going all the time??

      .

      i grow about 12 different kinds of lettuces and just go around and pick a few leaves off each one. They grow more leaves to replace what was taken. Out in my garden they last most of the season until the summer heat starts to take a toll on them.

      I replant in late July and by September we’re back up and running until a hard freeze happens. Now inside if I’m running AC and the house stays fairly cool and I move it back so it’s not getting cooked in the summer sun/window, it can last all summer. You have to kind of ration use to once or twice a week to give it time to regrow.

      You have to kind of watch your plants and if they look like they are tiring out then start some new ones up. The neat thing is once you figure this all out for your growing situation then you can grow lettuces all year round! Just keep an eye out and try to give new plants a 2 month head start before the old ones totally give out.

      They also grow slower int eh winter so you have to allow extra time for them. Grow lights (just regular florescent lights!) are really important in the winter months.

      @jkpjohnson 115312 wrote:

      Also, do you store the seeds in the freezer until you use them all? If so, how long do they last (packets normally say 1 year).

      You can freeze seeds in glass jars. The seeds must be dry and properly cured if they are your own. When you need more seeds remove the jar from the freezer and let set for one hour before you try to open it!

      Wipe the jar totally down to remove all moisture then open the jar and remove what you need and then reseal the jar and return it to the freezer. If you start with good viable seed it can last a very long time kept this way. I only grow seed carrots every 20 years.

      8 carrots will give me over a quart of seed and last over 20 years in the freezer. It’s very important to keep the seed dry. If you freeze damp seeds it will kill it.

      Hope this answered your questions and didn’t confuse you!

      Cherlynn
      Normally in nw mo but currently in sunny florida panhandle

    • #419571

      Our seeds are kept in envelopes in a cardboard box on the top of a cabinet in our living room. We have had good luck with this method of storage. Don’t know how long they will store but have some that are 15 years old now and the germination was 100 percent this year.
      Have also stored seed in glass containers (old canning jars) with screw on lids (just screwed on–not tight or sealed) put on a shelf away from the heat and out of the sunlight.
      Thanks; Virginia

    • #419928

      Ok, while I was gone, I got an e-mail from organic gardener and they had a link to the Maryland Extension service plans for a great salad garden bed. Here’s the link for anyone who would like to see it!

      https://www.hgic.umd.edu/documents/HG601SaladTables_SaladBoxes.pdf

      Always good to get back home!
      Cherlynn

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