Budget Menu & Dirt Cheap Recipes Mixes~MYO~Copycat~Etc Homemade Cheez Whiz Recipe

This topic contains 12 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Candace February 15, 2012 at 1:10 pm.

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  • #268841

    Makes 1 lb

    1 pound processed cheese, cut into small pieces
    13 ounces can evaporated milk
    4 tablespoons margarine
    1 teaspoon salt
    Dash of Tabasco sauce
    1 teaspoon dry mustard

    Melt all ingredients in heavy saucepan or double boiler over medium heat. Pour into containers; let cool. Use on crackers or in recipes calling for Cheez Whiz.

  • #431224

    Just wondering the fridge life of the cheese whiz. Love that I can make this and not have so many preservatives to worry about!

  • #431225

    Liss
    Keymaster

    with evaporated milk & butter I would say probably no more than a week after its been made.

  • #431227

    Is the 1 lb of processed cheese referring to Velveeta or equivalent…or something else altogether?

  • #431373

    I make up a recipe almost like this one and seal it into small canning jars. I make it up for our food storage. Stores well for over 5 years.

  • #431375

    brchbell,
    How did you can the Cheez Whiz? Water bath or pressure canner?

  • #431383

    Cheez Whiz

    I make 4 batches at a time which is one can of milk

    3 oz evaporated milk
    1 tsp vinegar
    ½ tsp salt
    1 lb. Velveeta
    ½ tsp dry mustard

    Melt milk and cheese in double boiler. When creamy and smooth add remaining ingredients and mix well. Cook for 5 minutes.

    Fill half pint jars and process in a water bath for 10 minutes.

  • #431395

    just like betsy9977 i need to know if water bath or pressure canner is used to can this recipe?

  • #431397

    Water bath process for 10 minutes, it’s in my recipe above!

  • #431403

    Thank you so much for sharing your recipe, brchbell! I look forward to making this 🙂

  • #431402

    I’m trying hard to build up our food stores and canning meats is easy but really wanted to find a way to can more cheese. I just found this article in an old Backwoods Magazine: I have canned mozzarella and cheddar cheeses, so far, both with good results. Canning cheese is, so far, kind of an experimental trial; you won’t find it in any books that I know of.

    Being a high acid food (lactic acid), it is fairly safe to play around with. If it goes bad, it simply goes moldy. You won’t get food poisoning from cheese.


    The way I can cheese is to cut the cheese into about one inch squares and place them in a wide mouthed pint jar sitting in a pan of water on the stove. As the cheese heats, it melts and I can add more cheese. I do this until the cheese is about 1/2 an inch from the top of the jar.

    I’m careful not to get cheese on the rim of the jar because any grease or oil on it can cause lids to fail to seal.
    After the jars are as full as I wish, I carefully wipe the rim of the jar clean with a hot, damp cloth. Then I place a hot, previously simmered lid on the jar and screw the ring down firmly tight.

    The jars are processed for 25 minutes in a boiling water bath canner, making sure that you begin to count the time from when the canner comes to a full rolling boil after you have added the jars. Also make sure that the water covers the jars by at least an inch.
    To remove a cheese from the jar, after storage, again place it in a pan of water and heat it until the outside of the cheese is just beginning to melt.

    Then run a knife around it and gently pry the cheese out onto a plate. Once opened, this cheese must be refrigerated like any other cheese, to avoid molding.

    i haven’t tried this yet but it sounds like a method i’ve always wondered if it would work. i try it as soon as i can afford to get the cheese again! i need to start making cheese again but don’t have our own cow now and the neighbor doesn’t want to share right now.

    cherlynn

    cherlynn

  • #431413

    @brchbell 217149 wrote:

    Cheez Whiz

    I make 4 batches at a time which is one can of milk

    3 oz evaporated milk
    1 tsp vinegar
    ½ tsp salt
    1 lb.

    Velveeta
    ½ tsp dry mustard

    Melt milk and cheese in double boiler. When creamy and smooth add remaining ingredients and mix well. Cook for 5 minutes.

    Fill half pint jars and process in a water bath for 10 minutes.

    i saw this exact recipe on a survivalist website a few years ago and printed it out for my cookbook. i was always worried about the potential for botulism, the smoke point of dairy products is too low, so if you try to can dairy products, you can not get it to a high enough temperature to destroy the botulism producing enzymes. c.

    botulinum produces spores that are extremely resistant to heat. they can survive 18 hours of boiling and still grow.

    It is tempting, but please do not do it. Your family’s health, and even lives, could be at risk, It’s your choice, but when you consider that botulism is tasteless, odorless and deadly, I think that is enough reason not to can butter or faux cheese etc.

  • #431414

    I’ve used this for many years and never had a problem. Dairy produces are very acid and can safely be canned. As a biochemist I highly dispute your comment about C.

    botulinum being able to survive the canning process. Having tested many products over my career with the USDA I can tell you as long as You follow regular canning procedures and keep the area very clean and the seals are very clean you will not have a problem.

  • #431444

    @brchbell 217447 wrote:

    I’ve used this for many years and never had a problem. Dairy produces are very acid and can safely be canned..

    while i respect your opinion, i have to disagree. the reason you are unable to find home-canned dairy recipes is because most dairy products are extremely low in acid, not high in acid. most dairy has a low ph.

    Quote:
    as a biochemist i highly dispute your comment about c. botulinum being able to survive the canning process. having tested many products over my career with the usda i can tell you as long as you follow regular canning procedures and keep the area very clean and the seals are very clean you will not have a problem

    i agree it can be canned, with a pressure canner, certainly not a water bath.
    national center for home food preservation | how do i? can

    canning low-acid foods in boiling water canners is absolutely unsafe
    because 212 degrees F is not high enough to destroy botulinum bacteria.

    Source: http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/pdf/5338.pdf

    What makes you think that Velveeta (a cheese-food, NOT Cheese) is high acid?

    Perhaps it works for your family I guess I’m just not willing to take the risk with my own. I cant find any actual research that backs up your opinion and by your own blog posts, your health hasn’t always been optimal. Botulism poisoning is horrible stuff and people dont ever truly recover from it.

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Budget Menu & Dirt Cheap Recipes Mixes~MYO~Copycat~Etc Homemade Cheez Whiz Recipe