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      With all due respect to Karen, this could end in a very slippery slope.

      Bribing aside, if they were to come to the aid if there was an issue and

      they were hurt or worse, it becomes a litigation potential.

      It sounds like the instigator is at times, the son, so I’d lean towards

      letting them/him work it out. If he’s disabled, he’s going to have to do

      that even more in the workplace and adult years, so best to practice on kids

      now. LOL Learning the right approach and handling of people could mean the

      success or failure of interviews, performance and peer reviews, personal

      contracts negotiation (buying a home, car), etc.

      Just my thoughts!

      ~S

      .
      Original Message
      .

      From: “Karen” <karensbirds@yahoo.com>

      > Only thing I can suggest is when your son is not around – talk to the

      > boys that live by you. Tell them matter of factly that your son is

      > disabled and that while you do NOT expect them to be his friends and

      > hang out with him you WOULD appreciate it if they would NOT make his

      > life any harder by calling him names or hitting him and you worry about

      > him at school and on the bus and if they’d keep a look out when they

      > are around and not let anyone else hurt him you’d sure appreciate it.

      > Be sure to mention that you don’t expect them to babysit but hey, man

      > if you see someone going to punch him, please get him some help. Then

      > give them an ice cream or candy bar for listening to you.

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