Budget Menu & Dirt Cheap Recipes F.A.Q baking bread

This topic contains 14 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by anacer33 February 2, 2015 at 8:48 pm.

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  • #303576

    Hello,

    i have the best husband, he bought me a kitchen aid stand mixer for christmas. i promised i would make him fresh bread every weekend which i do. i use the receipe that came in the booklet.

    however, he says the bread is to heavy/dense. does anyone have a receipe that would make the bread lighter more like store bought bread?

    also, does bread flour vs all purpose flour really make a difference?

    thank you.

    Ann

  • #431468

    Liss
    Keymaster

    Dense bread is can be caused by the following things:

    • Dead yeast due to water heat (or water being too cold to activate heat)
    • not enough or damaged gluten
    • insufficient kneading
    • inadequate rising time

    95 F is about the max temperature for water/milk in bread recipes.

    Most recently when baking, I’ve stopped using bread-flour (homemade by adding 1 tsp gluten per cup of flour), and started using all-purpose flour. The result is a much lighter/fluffier texture in the bread. It’s possible that my gluten was too old . . . but the fam & I decided that the breads were tastier without it.

    if you’re using Whole Wheat flour you Really need the gluten. Incorporate 1 tbsp. of either vital wheat gluten or vitamin C crystals into your dough.

  • #431469

    i actually use all purpose flour because it was cheaper to use. i saw bread flour and wondered how it would work but i didnt want to pay the price for it. i did have my yeast around 115-120.

    so i will try to cool the liquid down a little.

    how do i know if i damaged the gluten? (is that a stupid question?)

  • #431516

    @bethaliz6894 218187 wrote:

    i actually use all purpose flour because it was cheaper to use. i saw bread flour and wondered how it would work but i didnt want to pay the price for it. i did have my yeast around 115-120.

    so i will try to cool the liquid down a little.

    how do i know if i damaged the gluten? (is that a stupid question?)

    imo, it’s a pretty good question…something i wasn’t even aware that could happen.

    the last..many times i made home made bread, it was either really crumbly or was very heavy/dense. i thought i had made it the same way as i’ve always done, but evidently something went wrong…somewhere.

    liss, where does one buy the vital wheat gluten and/or vit c crystals?
    is the vital wheat gluten the same thing as dough enhancer? if not, what do you think the
    difference is and purposes?
    good grief, it would appear i’m just full of question tonight…

  • #431518

    dough enhancer? never heard of such a creature.

  • #431505

    Liss
    Keymaster

    Haha, you gals are keeping me busy this morn, lol 😉

    how do i know if i damaged the gluten? (is that a stupid question?)

    From what I’ve been told by various bakers/chefs over the years- one, by making the bread tough and overly chewy; or two, by failing to trap the gas given off by the yeast, which makes the bread flat and dense.

    >>Is the vital wheat gluten the same thing as dough enhancer?If not, what do you think the difference is and purposes?

    No. well, it’s very similar-

    Vital Wheat Gluten is manufactured from wheat flour that has been treated to remove nearly all of the starch to leave a very high protein content. (Gluten is the protein in wheat that makes dough elastic.) It can be used in small portions to increase volume and lighten texture.

    Dough Enhancer (recipe here) is a combination of several ingredients- Usually ginger, lecithin, ascorbic acid (Vitamin C Crystals)

    Apparently, the ginger kind of gooses the yeast and makes it act more swiftly, the ascorbic acid strengthens the gluten, and the lecithin aids the oil in causing the strands of gluten to slip against each other more easily and thus rise better.

    You can purchase Vital Wheat Gluten at most grocery stores in the baking isle near the flours. It’s generally on the upper shelves, rather than at eye level and comes in small boxes (see the photo).

    Happy Breadmaking Ladies!

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  • #431527

    In Canada, we can only purchase Vital Wheat Gluten in bulk in a bulk food store and there aren’t many of those around either and so expensive! Dough enhancer,I have never seen. I made my own.It would be so nice to be able to buy it in a box at the grocery store.

  • #431523

    @liss 219174 wrote:

    Haha, you gals are keeping me busy this morn, lol 😉

    From what I’ve been told by various bakers/chefs over the years- one, by making the bread tough and overly chewy; or two, by failing to trap the gas given off by the yeast, which makes the bread flat and dense.

    No. well, it’s very similar-

    vital wheat gluten is manufactured from wheat flour that has been treated to remove nearly all of the starch to leave a very high protein content. (gluten is the protein in wheat that makes dough elastic.) it can be used in small portions to increase volume and lighten texture.

    dough enhancer (recipe here) is a combination of several ingredients- usually ginger, lecithin, ascorbic acid (vitamin c crystals)

    apparently, the ginger kind of gooses the yeast and makes it act more swiftly, the ascorbic acid strengthens the gluten, and the lecithin aids the oil in causing the strands of gluten to slip against each other more easily and thus rise better.

    you can purchase vital wheat gluten at most grocery stores in the baking isle near the flours. it’s generally on the upper shelves, rather than at eye level and comes in small boxes (see the photo).

    happy breadmaking ladies!

    for some reason last night, since i couldn’t sleep, i was just full of questions…lol
    :d

    thanks for clearing that one up!!

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  • #431529

    thank you liss, i wish i could get you a loaf of homemade bread. with your help, it will one day be perfect.

  • #431564

    Liss
    Keymaster

    :turkydance1:Hehe, all my bread baking advice and you ladies ought to see the weird looking loaf that came out of my bread machine yesterday! I don’t know WHAT I forgot to put in it, but my chickens were happy to receive it! I’ll Post photos later this week with a bread troubleshooting article. lol- I think I made 4 loaves of raisin bread before I got the recipe the way I wanted it.

  • #431565

    that is so funny about the funny shape of bread. i had on that i had put to much dough in the bread pan, and when i put it into the oven the jiggle made it fall on one side and it looked like a man’s belly that weighed 300 pounds to much and lost the weight. it was the goofiest site ever.

  • #431569

    @liss 219967 wrote:

    :turkydance1:Hehe, all my bread baking advice and you ladies ought to see the weird looking loaf that came out of my bread machine yesterday! I don’t know WHAT I forgot to put in it, but my chickens were happy to receive it! I’ll Post photos later this week with a bread troubleshooting article.

    lol- I think I made 4 loaves of raisin bread before I got the recipe the way I wanted it.

    bethaliz6894;219984 wrote:
    that is so funny about the funny shape of bread. i had on that i had put to much dough in the bread pan, and when i put it into the oven the jiggle made it fall on one side and it looked like a man’s belly that weighed 300 pounds to much and lost the weight. it was the goofiest site ever.

    oh yeah…i can so relate…

  • #431801

    i found out how to make the perfect loaf of bread. when you set the dough for the first raise, take a nap. have hubby wake you up when the bread has been raising twice as long as it should have.

    it should have been half full of a punch bowl, it actualy filled my punch bowl 🙂 best spongiest bread i ever have made.

  • #453438

    I have had a bread machine for years and have not perfected my bread recipes. I put it away and it has been a long time. This has inspired me to break it out and start playing again.

    I think my yeast was old so first thing is buy some new stuff. 🙂

  • #459587

    I use my Kitchenaid machine all the time. Measure by weight only for great bread. I can’t emphasize this enough!

    The ratio of flour to water is 8/5. I use 900 g flour and 540 g water for a 2 loaf batch. Just throw in the dry ingredients; flour, 2 1/2 tsp yeast, 1 Tbsp salt.

    Add 2 Tbsp oil and the water and mix with the dough hook on med setting (2) for 5 min. Put a bit of oil right in the bowl, shake it around a little to coat the ball of dough and put in a warm oven to rise (30 min or so).
    Divide the dough, punch down and put in bread pans. Back in the warm oven for another hour or so to rise again.

    Bake at 450ºF for 15 min, reduce to 350 for 25 min more and Voila!

    I use half all-purpose flour and half whole wheat for a variation. Same 8/5 ratio
    Rye bread, pizza dough, buns …… 8/5

  • #460628

    so much information about baking bread…is making me…..hungry

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Budget Menu & Dirt Cheap Recipes F.A.Q baking bread