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    • #268832

      I used to before making soap but always did basic stuff. Soap is so much fun because there are so many recipes and different types you can do.

      Does anyone have any fun ideas for making candles?

    • #408540

      hhhmmm nope. I only do cp soap. I love soaping.

      candels are not too hard. They are verry melt and pour. Add colors, scents, imbeds.

      My local ren fair has a candel lady I talked to last year. She has people make there own in sand boxes. They stamp the shape into the sand , set the wick in and just pour the wax.

      kinda fun. I always think that It would be easy to set up for a girls party.

    • #408563

      I’ve always wanted to make my own candles. I really like the gel candles, but I’ve also heard that the soy candles are better for burning. Doesn’t leave black on the jar and burns cleaner.

      If you have any tip on how to make them, it would be great. Thanks.

    • #408602

      your right, it is kinda just melt and pour… you buy the wax in bulk and melt it in a double boiler or microwave and pour into the molds with a wick.

      i used to buy this beeswax sheets that were neat – where you roll them up over the wick instead. i wonder if they still sell these. they came out neat, all bumpy, and no melting needed.

      i guess the fun with candles would be the decorating them or the jars you use. i guess you could also mix colors or use glitter. you could also put chunks in them of smaller shapes?

      hmm.. im gonna have to go to the craft store and see what they have.

    • #408622

      My D made a basket of dipped firestarter pinecones for her one grandparents (they have a woodburning stove) which was so easy…but very time consuming. You just tie wick to the top of the pinecone and dip in the wax, then in cold water, then wax until you get the desired thickness. We let them cool on wax paper.

      Then, she used the left over wax and made ice candles for her other grandparents (she seen it on tv). We used an old pringles can. You hold a taper candle in the middle, pour a little wax in to set the candle, then add crushed ice, then a little wax and repeat till you have the size you wish.

      You have to let the candle set for a while (we waited 2 hours) and then pealed the pringles can. It was very messy…lots of water came out so do the pealing over the sink. We set them on a towel to dry for a couple of days, turning them.

      every now and then. The candles looked really neat they have little holes where the ice was.

    • #408895

      This response is given with the greatest respect and concern for all, and do encourage people to learn new crafts.

      I make soy candles and melts (as well as a variety of other home fragrance items). It is fun and I enjoy it very much. I don’t want to burst anyone’s bubble but I have to say….

      that making candles while not hard it is time consuming and expensive to get started. You should test your candles for the proper burn before giving them to anyone, wouldn’t want someone’s house to burn down. They can be dangerous if not wicked properly or the fragrance oil is not used at the correct percentage.

      I spent 1 year testing before I had a candle that I could comfortably give to another person. Can’t tell you how many candles started on fire before getting my formula figured out.

      I really hope this is not taken as a negative but as a caution. If you are making candles for yourself as long as you are cautious and burn them properly you can have a lot of fun and some nice candles to enjoy.

      While I don’t condsider myself an expert by any means and I only make candles in containers, if anyone has any questions feel free to ask me, if I can help I will gladly. I know that the craft stores have small amounts of wax you can purchase as well as all the supplies. That is what I used when I started.

      Just be careful because before you know it you will be addicted and will grow from there.

      Linda

    • #408902

      I hear you on the expensive part. it cost me hundreds to start soaping. I had to collect each item needed one at a time till I had everything.

      I thought I would never get there. Then I look around and everyone and there brother soaps!!! How do they afford it??

      @candleladymn 99674 wrote:

      This response is given with the greatest respect and concern for all, and do encourage people to learn new crafts.

      I make soy candles and melts (as well as a variety of other home fragrance items). It is fun and I enjoy it very much. I don’t want to burst anyone’s bubble but I have to say….

      that making candles while not hard it is time consuming and expensive to get started. You should test your candles for the proper burn before giving them to anyone, wouldn’t want someone’s house to burn down. They can be dangerous if not wicked properly or the fragrance oil is not used at the correct percentage.

      I spent 1 year testing before I had a candle that I could comfortably give to another person. Can’t tell you how many candles started on fire before getting my formula figured out.

      I really hope this is not taken as a negative but as a caution. If you are making candles for yourself as long as you are cautious and burn them properly you can have a lot of fun and some nice candles to enjoy.

      While I don’t condsider myself an expert by any means and I only make candles in containers, if anyone has any questions feel free to ask me, if I can help I will gladly. I know that the craft stores have small amounts of wax you can purchase as well as all the supplies. That is what I used when I started.

      Just be careful because before you know it you will be addicted and will grow from there.

      Linda

    • #408910

      @redring 99681 wrote:

      I hear you on the expensive part. it cost me hundreds to start soaping. I had to collect each item needed one at a time till I had everything.

      I thought I would never get there. Then I look around and everyone and there brother soaps!!! How do they afford it??

      I currently am pouring around 150 different fragrances (that is just the ones that tested successfully) probably have 30-40 more fragrances that did not turn out or have not been tested yet. I don’t like to think about the amount of money I have tied up in inventory. :022:

      I know I have seen so many soapers and B&B people at the craft shows I sell at. I have always wondered how they make their products stand out. Soap is something I really do not have any interest in making – for a variety of reasons.

      But I do appreciate those of you who go throught the effort and time to make it.

      I absolutely enjoy looking at everyone’s soap creations. Is there a place that you have pictures of yours posted so I might see them? Do you sell yours?

      If so in what venue?

      Sorry did not mean to hijack this thread.:smile:

      Linda

    • #408914

      I made candles for Christmas. Everyone loves them, I also bought the candle warmers for them which helped with the flame thing as well as them burning correctly. These were gel, melt the gel add the scent and pour.

      It is time consuming and I spent I think about 45.00 and made 6 middle sized ones and 11 small ones. The containers I got at Ollies for 1.00 a piece for the larger ones and the small ones were a pack of 10 small one for 1.00 the rest was materials

    • #408916

      lol! I have a verry empty etsy right now. I would like to do more but I keep running into a few problems. Like you said With soooooooooo many soapers how do I make anyone want mine??

      Also My job runs my life. I wish it was not so but time to go to shows is just not there. After cristmass though ( I ended up bartering my whole shop for presents) I need to restock.

      maybe all the bartering will result in sales. We have a local farmers market close that is indoor and all year. I keep telling my self I will get in there.

      course i really need to do some major soaping first. also I have no insurence. That worries me a bit but it is far too costly. untill i could guarentee more than 2 sales a month $500 -$5000 in insurence is gastly.

      All the same even though i test a bar from each batch my slef befor i will sale or gift some people just want to see what they can get out of you. The legall system certaintly is not fair and that worries me. For now i think I am happy to barter and get a few sales.

      I just want to sell enough for new suplies. So i can make more :). Anyway with the new laws they are passing I will be out of business befor I start.

      my etsy is empty or mostly so but you are welcome to look. Etsy :: naturallygoddess :: Naturally Goddess

    • #411718

      I make candles from time to time and really enjoy it. I got basics from Michael’s – large block of wax, wicks, thermometer, fragrance – then bought a bunch of cups with saucers from my favorite thrift store. I gave the candles out and gotten a lot of positive feedback.

      My caution would be to remember that wax can catch fire – use a double boiler with a thermometer to heat wax. I also remelted old candles, pulled out the wicks and then repoured them into canning jars – turned out great.

    • #411797

      I make candles from time to time and really enjoy it. I got basics from Michael’s – large block of wax, wicks, thermometer, fragrance – then bought a bunch of cups with saucers from my favorite thrift store. I gave the candles out and gotten a lot of positive feedback.

      My caution would be to remember that wax can catch fire – use a double boiler with a thermometer to heat wax. I also remelted old candles, pulled out the wicks and then repoured them into canning jars – turned out great.

    • #411991

      A friend of mine also makes candles. She also shops thrift shops and yard sales for her containers. She will also make a candle using a container the customer brings in as long as the material can handle the heat.

      When she does this she only charges the person for the price of the wax she uses. She has been experimenting for years with her scentsand she has so many great ones, I have a hard time choosing. :p

    • #412067

      A friend of mine also makes candles. She also shops thrift shops and yard sales for her containers. She will also make a candle using a container the customer brings in as long as the material can handle the heat.

      When she does this she only charges the person for the price of the wax she uses. She has been experimenting for years with her scentsand she has so many great ones, I have a hard time choosing. :p

    • #414373

      I’ve tried making soy candles with kits that people make on ebay (soy flakes, wick, fragrance, and warning stickers) but even following the directions mine never smell very much. I had one candle that i made once that actually permeated the room the way i wanted (the way a yankee candle would) but any that i made after that i could barely smell when the candle was lit.
      i have a feeling m&p soap making will be loads easier then m&p soy candle making.
      from what i read there isn’t so much science and timing with soap then candles.
      with candles you have to melt the soy to an exact degree before you put the fragrance in–if its too hot the fragrance evaporates–if its too cold it sinks to the bottom and you never smell it 🙁
      my candles too (even with the kit) had sink holes that looked horrible 🙁 it was just probably not my craft even tho i really badly wanted to do well at it.
      hopefully soap making will go easier :d i think i’ll find out today lol

    • #420927

      I have to agree that both hobbies are REALLY expensive. You can get deals on wholesale items on ebay, I used to buy big blocks of soap from there but selling it is difficult too since like everyone said, how do you make yours stand out? I found this great etsy seller, hope they don’t mind if i post it here, but it was really inspirational to me if I ever want to start soaping/candling again.

      Everything is so beautifully made an so unique! CrazyKBathandBody on Etsy – Handcrafted soaps, lotions, bath stuff and more!

      I enjoyed reading the post here about safety with candles. I use my own products for personal use or as gifts, do you have any safety tips or advice for us on making candles?

    • #420939

      I have not tried to make candles before, but I love crafts & you guys have inspired me! 🙂

    • #423910

      The only time I made candles was for an art project. I was a kid at the time but remember dumping rectangles or wax into a jar with crayon for color. The jars where boiled in water to heat the wax and would take wicks and dip them and then dip in water and dip in wax…then water….then wax and form it with our hands while doing so.

      The process seemed simple but I’m not sure what wax they used or of any specific measurements.

      Beyond…that…One hurricane season I melted down a ton of tiny candles and made a big ball of wax with a twisted napkin for a wick. It was probably dangerous. LAwl The thing was like a torch and no wind was putting it out!

    • #425058

      I think I get all my supplies, which are scattered throughout the house and make some candles! I have been wanting to do this for some time now, but this just got me motivated! Thanks.

    • #425075

      I’ve always made candles! My kids and I have even dug bowl shapes at the beach and laid twine across to make a cross and a way to hang the finish candle and insert a wick and pour right there on the beach. These made really great gifts!

      When we studied pre-Revolutionary times we repeatedly dipped our wicks and made the double candle sticks. We fill wax milk cartons with crushed ice and decorations and pour wax in with a wick in the middle for awesome Christmas candles. We always keep supplies laid up so we can make candles any time we need to!

      I guess it’s something I do with out ever thinking about it!

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