Saving food in general

Hello, I am mostly interested in finding a solution to my freezer-problem here in my house. I want to make food in advance to cut my costs, but I only have a little freezer (one of them above-fridge thingies). I can't buy one since it costs a lot and also uses a lot of electricity I think. I

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  1. #1
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    Default Saving food in general

    Hello,

    I am mostly interested in finding a solution to my freezer-problem here in my house. I want to make food in advance to cut my costs, but I only have a little freezer (one of them above-fridge thingies). I can't buy one since it costs a lot and also uses a lot of electricity I think. I cook soup myself, which takes up almost all the room in my fridge already.

    Are there other options? I've read on this forum that canning isn't simple either (sterilizing it all and stuff, I don't have those tools either).

    I've also read about vacuum machines, but then again it needs to be stored in a freezer, right?

    Does anyone have a simple way to preserve food (e.g. leftovers) for a long time?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Ulrike For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
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    Default Re: Saving food in general

    Boy I'm sure looking for a solution to this one! As far as I know you either have to freeze it or can it with a pressure canner. You might want to keep you eye out for a pressure canner. I got a nice big one brand new at a garage sale for $25 but I got a smaller one at a thrift store for $1 that we use a lot and I loan out to my son, ect. I'm always looking for canners or canning jars!

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Saving food in general

    Wow, lucky you to get your hands on a pressure canner for $1!

    I was wondering... my mum always puts soup and jam in jars when they're hot and turns them upside down for a while and then keeps them in the fridge... does anyone know if this is applicable to other food aswell (sauces for example)?

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    Default Re: Saving food in general

    the best thing is figure out what your family eats in a week that are fave meals. You make two of that meal, eat one freeze one or you can do half meals like marinating chicken/turkey/pork then cook the rest of the meal.

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    Default Re: Saving food in general

    I was wondering... my mum always puts soup and jam in jars when they're hot and turns them upside down for a while and then keeps them in the fridge... does anyone know if this is applicable to other food aswell (sauces for example)?

    NO, it's NOT SAFE, it's called "Open Kettle Canning:. It's an old-fashioned way of "sealing jars". The theory is that if the top seals then it's safe. It's a FALSE Theory and you can DIE from Botulism by canning this way, especially canning soups.

    When food is spooned or poured into the jars, bacteria can get into the jar- if you seal it without processing, you've made the perfect home for bacteria to grow and thrive- and then Kill Ya or at the very least, make you feel like your insides are falling out after you've eaten it. My grandma had 7 feet of her intestines surgically removed after she got sick with botulism, her health was never the same.

    Other Unsafe Canning Practices include:


    • Adding an aspirin to the jars.
    • Using the dishwasher to seal jars (scary thought!)
    • Oven Canning
    Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati - When all else fails, play dead.

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    Default Re: Saving food in general

    Quote Originally Posted by Ulrike View Post
    I was wondering... my mum always puts soup and jam in jars when they're hot and turns them upside down for a while and then keeps them in the fridge... does anyone know if this is applicable to other food as well (sauces for example)?
    You can do this but you must put the jars in the freezer due to nasty bacteria in the food. Just be sure to leave 1/2 in. head space instead of the normal 1/4 in. head space. Food swells up more when cooked and then frozen in jars. The jars will be safe but make sure they are completely cool before doing it or you can have a jar that will break in the freezer.

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    Default Re: Saving food in general

    Quote Originally Posted by Ulrike View Post
    I want to make food in advance to cut my costs, but I only have a little freezer (one of them above-fridge thingies). I can't buy one since it costs a lot and also uses a lot of electricity I think.
    You can't really store much in a Frig freezer for long-range planning so I would start saving money to buy a small chest freezer. They really aren't that costly in electricity, but they are high in benefits for more food storage. I got a 5.7 cu.ft. one and love it. They are less costly because they are not 'frost free' (which are costly) and will need to defrost it manually over time.

    Even more important for long-term food storage is to invest in a FoodSaver Vacuum Sealer. It 'is' expensive, but it pays off in the long-term storage without freezer-burn. I have food that has been in my freezer longer than a year and it is perfect when I take it out and thaw.
    I cook soup myself, which takes up almost all the room in my fridge already.
    You learn to freeze and store soups and other liquids so they are 'flat' and can be stacked in the freezer to maximize space.
    I've read on this forum that canning isn't simple either (sterilizing it all and stuff, I don't have those tools either).
    Canning many foods is VERY simple and some of it does not require special tools. Canning gives you the ability to safely store foods at room temperature for extended periods without filling up your freezer. Canning does require knowledge of what you are doing (and why) so you do not accidentally poison yourself or others.

    There are two types of Canning: (1) Boiling Water Bath for preserving jams, jellies, fruits, and pickled items. These are known as "high-acid" foods. Any large stock pot can be used for this; (2) Pressure Canning for meats and vegetables, which are "low-acid" foods and requires specialized equipment to reach very high temperatures to kill a specialized bacteria known as C. Botulinum. Wal-Mart and similar stores sell a 16-qt Pressure Canner (weighted rocker) for under $70 and is ideal for the home canner. They hold 7 quart jars or up to 9 pint jars. Learn more about home canning by getting the current Ball Blue Book Guide To Preserving ($6.00) available in many stores and online.
    I've also read about vacuum machines, but then again it needs to be stored in a freezer, right?
    For regular food items, yes, but the advantage is elimination of freezer burn and to allow for longer storage times.

    I also DEHYDRATE many foods, which then can be stored indefinitely at room temperature as long as they are kept away from moisture. The American Harvest/NESCO dehydrators are great to start with and are not that expensive. Again, the benefits are worth the initial expense. Dehydrating eliminates tossing out ripe food that will otherwise spoil. I love doing tomatoes, onions, celery, garlic, beet and other greens, zucchini, potato slices, etc.
    I used to eat a lot of natural foods until I learned that most people die of natural causes.

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    Default Re: Saving food in general

    Quote Originally Posted by Armymomof2 View Post
    You can do this but you must put the jars in the freezer due to nasty bacteria in the food. Just be sure to leave 1/2 in. head space instead of the normal 1/4 in. head space. Food swells up more when cooked and then frozen in jars. The jars will be safe but make sure they are completely cool before doing it or you can have a jar that will break in the freezer.
    The jars are only "safe" if you KEEP them frozen. Freezing does not kill all bacteria, yeasts and molds present in food, but it does prevent their multiplication if the food is held at 0F or less. When thawed, the surviving organisms can multiply again. So don't stick them in the freezer thinking that you can freeze them for 24 hours and then stick them in your pantry, you can't.
    ~Enjoy!~

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