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  1. #1
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    Default New laws affecting clothes, books etc

    FROM RIA: As a mom, I am concerned about lead however this law is stupid (and I rarely use that word). By these regs you and anyother HSer will have to buy NEW books that have been tested. No used books will be allowed to be sold - etsy, ebay, etc. Goodwill, Sal Army technically can't sell you books, mags etc that are for kids.

    Time to contact the various politicians to change this ASAP. Might be a great history/american gov project for kids too

    FEEL FREE TO PASS ON THIS (whole or part)..


    Change.org - Ideas for Changing America: Save Small Business From the CPSIA

    The United States Congress rightly recognized that the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) lacked the authority and staffing to prevent dangerous toys from being imported into the US. So, they passed the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) in August 2008. Among other things, the CPSIA bans lead and phthalates in children's products, mandates third party testing and certification, and requires manufacturers of all goods for children under the age of 12, to permanently label each item with a date and batch number.

    Anyone who produces or sells any of the following new or used items will be required to comply with the law: toys, books, clothing, art, educational supplies, materials for the learning disabled, bicycles, and more. Any uncertified item intended for children under the age of 12 will be considered contraband after February 10, 2009.

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  3. #2
    south bend IN cat lady
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    this is not sane! Why are we doing this in the US when The problem is trades with china??? Hello!!! Cut off china?? We would regaine jobs then because you wouldent believe what ONLY china produces now. Like vitamin C.

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  5. #3
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    Unfortunately second hand clothes stores (large and small) will have to ditch their stock. This means either dump or send to second class nations, either way its wasteful.

    I can't imagine the "clothes and book police" are really going to go after yard sales.

    Those that make a small living knitting, or making clothes are going to hurt.

    Homeschoolers are definately going to feel the pinch if you can't buy used books legally. It has been handy using the internet to find a specific book or educational item, now you won't be able to do it.

    Ria

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  7. #4
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    They have lost their ever loving minds. I have seen some stupid laws but this beats them all
    Mdowdy

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  9. #5
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    yep the first notice I got was about clothes, which I can understand BUT -- now its toys, books , educational supplies (gee does that mean tape, markers, rulers etc), even CDs (the only ones that will be able to afford this will be the big companies so the small companies will have to stop)

    I think for the small companies and resales its not fair to expect them to come up with the $4000 for testing per item.. Obviously the major manufacturing company making a T SHirt, kids blankets etc can check all its stuff (the buttons, thread, dyes, fabric, decals, trim etc) and it would cover the thousands that they produce in that line ..

    How about the people that do community service and knit hats for preemies, or make blankets for homeless kids, etc? You can't expect them to be able to do it, and the non-profit groups distributing them can't afford the cost to check and certify it either

    People are going to have to write and I think maybe its time to contact Obama. He's coming in and talks about change, well having the government use common sense would be a BIG CHANGE. (IMO - I haven't seen common sense in government since I could vote which was many many many years ago)

    Ria (Maine)

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  11. #6
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    latest news SOME resellers are ok .. think that includes Jack and Suzie, normal people selling on ebay, or resell lists?

    Still haven't heard anything about books, etc .. My son works part time at a non profit, I volunteer there. The Share Center supplies schools, other non profits with fabric, paper, books, tons of other stuff. If this is passed will it still be able to exsist?

    To be honest part of me is ticked cause this is Jake's paycheck and he pays rent.


    THANKS SHIRLEY M (CMSL)
    Regulators rethink rules on testing children's clothing and toys for lead - Los Angeles Times
    CONSUMER SAFETY
    Regulators rethink rules on testing children's clothing and toys for lead
    The Consumer Product Safety Commission gives a preliminary OK to exempt some items from testing after complaints of hardship to thrift stores and sellers of handmade toys.
    By Alana Semuels
    January 7, 2009
    The Consumer Product Safety Commission has given preliminary approval to changes in new lead-testing rules after complaints that the measures could have forced thrift stores and sellers of handmade toys to dispose
    of merchandise or even go out of business.

    If formally adopted, the changes approved on a first vote Tuesday would grant exemptions to last year's Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, which seeks to ensure that products for children do not contain dangerous amounts of lead.

    As currently written, the act would require all products aimed at children 12 and under to be tested for lead and phthalates starting Feb. 10. Phthalates are chemicals used to make plastics more pliable.

    Large manufacturers and retailers say the cost of testing will not be a burden. But small businesses such as handmade-toy shops and thrift stores say the requirement would force them to spend tens of thousands of dollars to test products such as clothing, in which the threat of lead is almost nonexistent. Many thrift stores said they would be forced to stop selling children's clothing or close altogether.

    The commission's two members (a third seat is vacant) voted tentatively to exempt:

    * Items with lead parts that a child cannot access;

    * Clothing, toys and other goods made of natural materials such as cotton and wood; and

    * Electronics that are impossible to make without lead.

    The commission also tentatively approved a rule that clarifies how it determines exclusions from the law.

    The vote opens up a 30-day public comment period that will begin when notice of the rules are printed in the Federal Register. Interested parties can find out how to submit comments by signing up to receive e-mail from the CPSC at www.cpsc.gov .

    No final rules will be approved until after Feb. 10, when the testing rules go into effect.

    That means retailers and manufacturers who sell untested children's merchandise would technically be in violation of the new law starting Feb. 10. Whether federal regulators will enforce the rules -- which might entail inspections at thousands of secondhand stores and toy shops across the country -- is another question.

    "The CPSC is an agency with limited resources and tremendous responsibility to protect the safety of families," said Scott Wolfson, a CPSC spokesman. "Our focus will be on those areas we can have the biggest impact and address the most dangerous products."
    ----

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  13. #7
    south bend IN cat lady
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    so.......who dose the testing????? If the companys do it themselves then that dosent solve any problem. And of course the big companys say they can handel the cost. The economy cant though. They will just turn over the cost to the consummer. As is companys are closeing like wildefire. We had four dennies and at least 1 coldstones close recently. I know , why do we need so many anyway?? We dont but can you imagen how many people are jobless because of it?? The economy cannot handel this law!!!

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  15. #8
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    I can see it now:
    People selling clothes on the blackmarket out of their garages or basements.

    It will get as bad as the drug dealers:
    Jane: Do you have any?
    Jill: Sure how much you looking for?
    Jane: I have a fiver what will that get me?

    Sorry, I have a warped sense of humor,

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