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Thread: pizza crust

  1. #1
    Deal GURU
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    Default pizza crust

    Hey all here is a recipe for a pizza dough. I made it the other night and it
    was big hit.

    1c.,plus 2 Tbs water
    2 Tbs olive or vegetable oil
    3 c. all purpose flour
    2 Tbs. grated Parmesan cheese
    1 1/2 tsp. Italian seasoning
    1 tsp. sugar
    1 tsp. salt
    2 1/2 tsp. yeast

    Mix together all ingredients and knead well. Let rise until double in size.
    Makes 2 pizza,6 slices each.

    Preheat oven @ 400 and bake for 18 to 20 minutes or until crust is light
    brown.

    Here is one for sause:

    1 can (8 ounces) tomato sauce
    1 tsp. Italian seasoning
    1 clove garlic,finely chopped

    Mix together and spread over pizza crust.
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    the budget101 Discussion list
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  2. The Following User Says Thank You to BiggerPiggyBank For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    joes71351
    Guest

    Default Pizza crust

    I want to start making pizza at home, and we like thin pizza crust -

    the thinner the better. I need recipes or instructions how to make

    good THIN pizza crust.



    Thanks in advance!



    Lyn in Indiana








  4. #3
    Ann Garner
    Guest

    Default Pizza crust

    I have a pizza crust recipe a co-worker passed on to me years

    ago. You adjust the flour on the thickness.



    3/4 cup self-rising flour

    3/4 cup plain flour

    one envelope yeast

    1 tsp sugar

    warm water



    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Mix the sugar, yeast, and about a

    tablespoon of warm water. Once the mix starts bubbling, pour it in

    the flour and start mixing it. I usually use a fork to mix. Keep

    adding warm water a little at a time until the dough is a sticky ball.



    Spread the dough on a greased pizza pan, place it in the oven for 5

    minutes to rise.



    Take the crust out, to with sauce <I use a small can of tomato sauce

    and sprinkle on dry Italian seasoning>, your choice of toppings, and

    cheese <a popular chain uses a half and half blend of American and

    Swiss cheese>. Put the pizza back in the oven for 15 to 20 minutes

    to finish cooking.



    To get a thicker pizza, use more self-rising flour and less plain,

    for thinner, use more plain and less self-rising. Just keep the

    total at 1 1/2 cups. My apology for not knowing what the measure

    amount of yeast is. I use it rarely enough that it's not worth it to

    buy it by the jar.



    Enjoy!

    Ann in Arkansas










  5. #4
    J Diane Northcutt
    Guest

    Default Pizza crust


    This makes a thin pizza crust.
    3/4 cup of water
    1 tsp lemon juice
    1 TBL oil
    1 TBL sugar
    1/2 tsp salt
    1 TBL dry milk
    2 1/2 Cups plain flour
    1 tsp yeast

    I let the bread machine mix this for me on the dough cycle. You can mix by hand / mixer and let it rise for 45 minutes.
    Once you roll it out onto the pizza pan , prebake it in the oven @ 400 degrees for 5 minutes. Then you can load it up with the ingredients of your choice and bake a few more minutes.

    Just a side note, never buy the littleenvelopes of yeast at the grocery store. Years agoI figured out the the little packets cost over 25.00 by time I went through a whole pound of yeast. By now it must come to much more than that.
    Buy yeast by the pound at Sams ,a health food store or through a co op. It cost 3.40 for a pound bag. That is an astonishing difference

    Diane

    [quote]
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Ann Garner
    To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Friday, June 27, 2008 8:01 AM
    Subject: Re: Budget101.com : Pizza crust



    <DIV id="ygrp-msg">









  6. #5
    Carole Scandrol
    Guest

    Default Pizza crust

    I figured out the enormous difference in the price of yeast about 2

    1/2 years ago! I just bought a pound bag at Costco for $3.59. I

    always keep my extra in the freezer in a sealed package. I have a

    Foodsaver and seal smaller amounts in separate packages. It keeps

    forever that way! I can't believe that supermarkets are getting $4

    or $5 for a little jar of yeast, and the tiny little packages are

    almost $2.00 for three of them! I've also bought bulk yeast on line

    at bulkfoods.com. It's worth it if you don't have a Sams or Costco

    near you, but you need to buy more than just yeast to justify the

    shipping costs.



    Carole

    napi21@charter.net

    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "J Diane Northcutt"

    <jdnorthcutt@...> wrote:

    >

    > This makes a thin pizza crust.

    > 3/4 cup of water

    > 1 tsp lemon juice

    > 1 TBL oil

    > 1 TBL sugar

    > 1/2 tsp salt

    > 1 TBL dry milk

    > 2 1/2 Cups plain flour

    > 1 tsp yeast

    >

    > I let the bread machine mix this for me on the dough cycle. You can

    mix by hand / mixer and let it rise for 45 minutes.

    > Once you roll it out onto the pizza pan , prebake it in the oven @

    400 degrees for 5 minutes. Then you can load it up with the

    ingredients of your choice and bake a few more minutes.

    >

    > Just a side note, never buy the little envelopes of yeast at the

    grocery store. Years ago I figured out the the little packets cost

    over 25.00 by time I went through a whole pound of yeast. By now it

    must come to much more than that.

    > Buy yeast by the pound at Sams ,a health food store or through a co

    op. It cost 3.40 for a pound bag. That is an astonishing difference

    >

    > Diane

    >

    > ----- Original Message -----

    > From: Ann Garner

    > To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com

    > Sent: Friday, June 27, 2008 8:01 AM

    > Subject: Re: Budget101.com : Pizza crust

    >










  7. #6
    Kelly
    Guest

    Default Pizza crust

    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "joes71351" <joes71351@...> wrote:

    >

    > I want to start making pizza at home, and we like thin pizza crust -



    > the thinner the better. I need recipes or instructions how to make

    > good THIN pizza crust.

    >

    > Thanks in advance!

    >

    > Lyn in Indiana

    >

    For many years I have been trying to learn the secrets of making a

    good thin-crust pizza. I've had this type of pie at various pizza

    parlors such as Shakey's Pizza Restaurant, Pizza Inn, Pizza Hut, and

    the Village Inn Pizza Parlor. I have been told that this type of

    pizza is officially known as an "Original California-Style" pizza and

    is also found at such restaurants as Straw Hat and Round Table. To

    quote the folks at Straw Hat, "California crust is special, it's a

    layered, flaky crust. It's airy and crispy on the bottom, yet

    bubbling on top. It has a cracker-like crunch, and is never soggy or

    limp."



    Here are some of the secrets that I have learned so far:



    The whole concept of the thin crust is more than just the flour or

    dough recipe, it is the method of sheeting the dough into the pizza

    pan. Most restaurants employ the use of a special machine known as a

    dough sheeter (or roller) which rolls out the dough quickly and

    evenly. They typically run the dough through the sheeter about 5 or 6

    times, dusting the dough with flour each time, to get it down to the

    paper-thin thickness. The function of the dusting flour is to

    actually incorporate more flour into the dough during the sheeting

    process. The dough is typically short a little flour in the mixing

    process so that it will sheet easier, so the dough reaches its final

    flour content during the dusting and sheeting process.



    Acme Dough Roller





    Thin-crust pizza dough is somewhat dry and dense after sheeting. You

    will need to dust the dough with flour several times as you roll it

    out in order to incorporate more flour into the recipe. This also

    helps ensure that the dough will not stick to the countertop and your

    rolling pin.





    It is important that you use flour with a high gluten content (12%

    protein or higher) in order to make the crust crispy. The King Arthur

    Flour Company manufactures a high-gluten flour that contains 14%

    protein which is excellent for this recipe (see their "Sir Lancelot"

    brand). If you don't have Sir Lancelot handy then use a quality bread

    flour that contains at least 12% protein. Do not use all-purpose

    flour.





    Retard dough a full day (24-hours) in the refrigerator (38 F to 40

    F). This allows the yeast to work long and hard which develops the

    dough's characteristic texture and, more importantly, its unique

    flavor. Allow dough to warm to room temperature for about an hour or

    two before rolling out and docking.





    Dough docker

    The dough must be docked after being sheeted and placed in pan.

    Docking prevents large air bubbles from forming in the crust. If you

    do not own a dough docker, you can use a fork to prick the dough

    thoroughly.





    Optional: Pre-cook the crust for 4 minutes before adding the sauce

    and toppings. This allows the crust to become more crisp before

    weighing it down with toppings.



    I have worked long and hard developing this recipe and it is by no

    means perfect. I have eaten more test-pizzas than I care to admit. I

    hope you enjoy the fruits of my labor and I hope that you share your

    pizza making experiences with me. Good luck!





    Dough Recipe

    1 pound (or about 3 1/2 cups) high gluten flour

    3/4 cup warm water

    1 tablespoon vegetable oil

    1 1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast

    1 1/2 teaspoon sugar

    1 teaspoon salt



    In a heavy-duty stand mixer fitted with dough hook, add the water,

    oil, yeast, salt, and sugar. Mix thoroughly until yeast has fully

    dissolved. Add flour and mix on low speed until all of the flour and

    water have mixed and a stiff dough ball forms, about 3 to 4 minutes.

    Stop mixing as soon as the dough ball forms as this type of dough

    should not be kneaded.



    Place the dough ball into a large bowl and cover tightly with plastic

    wrap. Let the dough rise for 24 hours in the refrigerator before

    using. Please note that I cannot over-emphasize the importance of a

    24-hour rising time since it is absolutely essential for the dough to

    develop its signature texture and, more importantly, its unique

    flavor! Do not skip this step!



    Thin-Crust Pizza Sauce

    28 oz. can whole peeled tomatoes in heavy puree

    1 tablespoon fresh green bell pepper, finely chopped

    1 teaspoon fresh yellow onion, finely chopped

    1 clove fresh garlic, minced

    1 teaspoon dried thyme

    1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

    1/2 teaspoon salt (or to taste)



    Place all ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth. Pour into

    a saucepan and simmer over low heat for 20 minutes (do not allow the

    sauce to boil). Allow to cool to room temperature before using.



    Preheat your oven to 500 F about one hour before you plan to bake

    the pizza.



    Turn the dough out onto a large surface and dust with flour. Using a

    heavy rolling pin (or dough sheeter), roll the dough out very thin to

    form a 24-inch or larger circle. If you're using a cutter pizza pan

    (recommended), dust the pan lightly with flour, place the dough in

    the pan and dock. Use the rolling pin to trim off the excess dough

    drooping over the sides of the pan. If you wish to cook the pizza

    directly on a pizza stone (not using a pan), then place the dough on

    a dusted pizza-peel, dock, and fold the edge over 1-inch all the way

    around and pinch it up to form a raised lip or rim.



    Optionally, pre-cook the crust for 4 minutes before adding any sauce

    or toppings. Remove the crust from the oven and pop any large air

    pockets that may have formed. Add the sauce, shredded mozzarella

    cheese, and your favorite toppings. Continue baking, on the lowest

    oven rack, rotating the pan half way through so that it cooks evenly,

    until crust is sufficiently browned and crisp, about 10 to 15

    minutes. Remove the pizza from the oven and slide pizza out of

    cooking pan onto a large wire cooling rack or cutting board. Allow to

    cool for 5 minutes before transferring to a serving pan. This step

    allows the crust to stay crisp while it cools, otherwise the trapped

    steam will soften the crust.



    Once cool, use a pizza cutter to slice the pie into pieces and enjoy!



    Kelly in IL








  8. #7
    Tracy Feuer
    Guest

    Default Pizza Crust

    I just throw these ingredients in my bread machine and set on the dough cycle or my machine calls it the manual cycle.



    6 oz of water

    2 cups of all purpose flour

    1 T of milk powder

    1 1/2 T of Sugar

    1 T oil

    1 tsp yeast



    I use this recipe for hamburger rolls, hot dog rolls, pizza crust and cinnamon rolls.



    For pizza crust once my machine beeps and tells me its done with its first rising.



    I divide the dough into four equal pieces and spray my hands and counter with cooking spray and just spread out thin. I bake these right away in my toaster oven at 350 F. for about 5 min on each side. I end up with something like a thin bobboli. I often bake these ahead a day and put in the fridge or freezer.



    If I use this recipe to make hamburger rolls I divide in fourths shape and let rise again.



    If I use this to make cinnamon rolls I just flatten on the counter like pizza sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar and roll into a jelly roll shape and slice.



    If you don't have a machine you can use a kitchen aide with a dough hook or you can mix the warm water with the sugar milk and yeast and let it get bubbly then you can add the ligquid along with the oil into the flour and knead for till its the consistency you need. But I suggest you scour the thrift shops for a machine first. I never bake in mine I don't like the way the bread turns out. I always just use it to make dough and then bake in my toaster oven



    With the rising cost of food we don't buy store bread anymore I figured this out shopping at Aldi's this recipe cost me 30 cents and make 4 pizza crust the size of a dinner plate.

    Tracy in Va

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  9. #8
    Kandy Kappler
    Guest

    Default Pizza Crust



    Mice will chew through a plastic bag quicker than quick. They eat soap, actually they eat just about ANYTHING. I don't know what to suggest to discourage them unless you put traps out for them. Maybe moth balls would help but I am not sure.





    Kandy





 

 
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