Freezing dairy

Hello all. I am new to the board. With prices rising on EVERYTHING, what can I freeze? I was told that I can freeze milk. Is this true? Does it change the taste? What about other dairy products like, yogurt, sliced cheeses, cottage cheese, cream cheese, etc. Thanks Adriann

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Thread: Freezing dairy

  1. #1
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    Default Freezing dairy

    Hello all. I am new to the board. With prices rising on EVERYTHING,
    what can I freeze? I was told that I can freeze milk. Is this true?
    Does it change the taste? What about other dairy products like,
    yogurt, sliced cheeses, cottage cheese, cream cheese, etc.

    Thanks
    Adriann
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  2. #2
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    I only drink reconstituted powdered milk ... bought a large rubbermaid
    container, and make 4 qts at a time (just fill water to the top, no
    measuring). But I freeze cream and cheese all the time, Just open the top
    so the cream can expand as it freezes. It won't whip but works fine in all
    other recipes. Cheese freezes fine. Cream cheese texture is cruddy but it
    works fine in cheesecake, etc.

    Daria
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  3. #3
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    Adriann,

    "I was told that I can freeze milk. Is this true?"

    Yes, you can freeze milk. It will seperate and so you have to shake it up
    before you drink it. Thaw it in the fridge. Some people think the taste is
    changed, but we usually use it for cooking. My kids haven't complained.
    Also someone else on the site (sorry I can't give credit because I don't
    remember) said if you take whole milk and divide it in half and add water to
    fill the container you get 2% milk. IT WORKS! My kids can't tell the
    difference and they are teenagers. It is saving us a lot right now.

    "What about other dairy products like,
    yogurt, sliced cheeses, cottage cheese, cream cheese, etc."

    As far as the above list, I freeze cheddar, american, cream and mozzerella
    cheese all the time. We buy it in bulk at Sam's (Wholesale wearhouse) and
    it works great. It does get crumbly, but you can't tell the difference in
    cooking. I haven't tried yogurt or cottage cheese.

    Hope all this helps.

    Roxanne in SC
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  4. #4
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    I don't know if it was on this group or not (and I'm way behind on my
    emails so forgive me if this has already been said) but you may get the
    same flavor and the amount of fat as 2% milk by adding water, but you
    or your kids are only getting half of the nutrients.

    Erin
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  5. #5
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    We purchase our sandwich chees {American} in big packages, already
    sliced. We then split it between quart size freezer bags and freeze.
    We have not froxen them past 2 months, but my girls do not notice a
    difference at all.

    BTW, we do a lot of freezing using freezer bags. We reuse all zipper
    bags {freezer, sandwich and snack size} as many times as we can. We
    also reuse aluminum foil whenever possible.

    We use the plastic bags that we bring our stuff home from shopping in
    as trash bags, or to wrap things in when being mailed. A lot of
    people are unaware of this, but when mailing a lot of the packages
    that we mail, they may very well be sitting outside on pallets with
    other peoples packages for up to a couple of weeks. It could rain. We
    learned this when my mother-in-law mailed homemade quilts, curtains
    and other bedding to my niece in Mississippi (we live in Maine). When
    they received the package, it was wett, and so was everything inside.
    I don't know if they ever got all of those water stains out.

    scrap paper: We homeschool, so this comes in handy. When at the post
    office I open mail and recycle junk. I keep anything that has a blank
    side, and the envelopes. We figure out math problems, doodle, let the
    kids we babysit draw on it, use it for shopping lists, errand lists
    and to leave notes for each other. We also use the envelopes for
    holding coupons. We reuse bigger envelopes (up to 8x10 or so)for
    storing important papers and other things.

    We reuse packaging whenever possible.

    We always reuse giftwrap, bags and boxes, as well as tissue paper.

    Shannon
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  6. #6
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    There is ALOT you can freeze.

    Milk (shake container after defrosting in the fridge, the liquid and the fats
    seperate during freezing and must be remixed. Takes a gallon about 4 days in my
    fridge to defrost so I pour the milk into one quart containers to freeze, the 1
    quart takes 1 day to defrost.)

    Cream Cheese (can be grainy once you take it out of freezer, but, if it gets
    that way I just plop it in my food processor and remix it.)

    Yogurt (I have NOT personally froze it, but I know a lot of people who have and
    it is good.)

    Cheese (cheese changes consisitency after it is frozen. If you freeze in a
    block, don't expect to be able to slice it as it crumbles easily after
    defrosting. BUT, if you slice it first or grate it before freezing, then it
    works just fine.)

    Sour Cream (gets runny after freezing, still works in cooking, but not as a
    topping for baked potatoes or in tacos. Still works just fine for stroganoff or
    goulash though.)

    Butter (I have kept it in the freezer for up to a year with no problems.... It
    keeps it rather nicely.)

    Margarine (same as butter. But I don't use margarine anymore.)

    Other items:

    Pineapple juice (I make sweet and sour sauce and I freeze the remaining juice...
    Freeze it in individual ice cube trays in 1 tablespoon measurements, or if there
    is a recipe you use all the time that uses a specific measurement freeze that
    measurement in a muffin tray. Then pop out and put in zip lock bags so you just
    have to grab exactly what you need.)

    Mushrooms (They don't freeze well whole. But for each pound of 'shrooms, I put
    a tablespoon of butter in a saucepan and melt. Chip the 'shrooms fine, and add
    to the melted butter, saute until golden brown. Freeze in 1 tablespoon
    measurements, and then you can use them to top steaks, or potatoes, or whatever.
    They freeze really well this way and don't get all runny/soggy like the whole
    ones do.)

    Rice (whenever I make a recipe that calls for rice, I cook extra. I then freeze
    the extra in 1 cup containers in the freezer. Great as a side dish, just remove
    and nuke, or already premeasured for inclusion in other recipes.)

    Cookie Dough (almost any cookies you make you can freeze the dough. I make the
    cookie dough as per usual, then I use a scoop to scoop the dough onto a cookie
    sheet. Freeze like that, then pop the little cookie dough nuggets off the
    cookie sheet, put in a ziplock bag and freeze. I start this in September of
    every year, and then I can bake fresh cookies all holiday season long by just
    taking however many I want/need out of the freezer and baking as usual. It
    takes only 1 extra minute or so in the oven because the dough is frozen.)

    Fudge (I do this like I do the cookie dough. I make my fudge, and then once it
    is all set in the pan I cut it and wrap each piece in plastic wrap then all the
    pieces go in a ziplock in the freezer. When the holidays come around and I do
    baskets as gifts or for company, I just have to go to the freezer and get out
    what I want.)

    Of course I freeze all manner of beef, pork, chicken, salmon, turkey, sausage,
    and bacon as well. I try to freeze them all in single or double serving sizes
    so I can pull out just what we need. Sometimes I leave it in larger sizes too
    so I would have enough to put up lunches for my husband too. Variety in size of
    package makes it so if he has enough lunches frozen I can just pull the smaller
    stuff, but if his supply of finished lunches is getting low I can pull a bigger
    package so I can refill.

    Emily Y.
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  7. #7
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    I must be on that other list too I remember a suggestion for cutting milk
    was to add reconstituted powdered milk rather than water to retain the nutrients
    but cut the cost and the fat.

    I think that was even in Tightwad Gazette ages ago--to buy whole milk and mix
    half whole, half reconstituted powdered skim--and you'd end up with a fat
    content similar to 2% but all the calcium, protein, etc. Cutting with water
    cuts everything in half, you're just watering down your milk.

    It was either mentioned on this list or on Frozen Assets, and I thought it was a
    good point.

    Betsy
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  8. #8
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    It is cheaper for us just to buy powdered milk and just reconstitute
    it. We drink skim milk, and it tastes just the same. With milk prices
    rising, I have looked into this again, just to make sure. We have two
    grocery stores right in our area. We shop them and the Family Dollar
    every week or two. Liquid skim milk is cheaper at IGA than Hannaford.
    Powdered milk is cheaper at Hannafod than at IGA. *But* powdered milk
    is cheaper per gallon at Hannaford, than powdered or liquid is at
    IGA. So we buy powdered at Hannaford.

    Also, I noticed a few other things during my shopping trip today. I
    was buying shampoo for a dollar at IGA/Family Dollar, but Hannaford
    has it for 89 cents. We dilute our sampoo with water by 1/3 and doo
    not notice a big difference.

    IGA sells yogurt for my girls at 2/$1.00, and hannaford has a store
    brand selling at 2/.89. *But* last week IGA had yogurt on sale
    for .39 each, which was cheaper. Also, Iga sells my larger yogurt for
    $1.99, but Hannaford sells a store brand at $1.79. IGA does not sell
    a store brand of yogurt, so Hannaford wins again.

    Hannaford does not have a reduced price card for bakery and produce,
    but IGA does, which saves me a lot of money most weeks. Soda is
    usually cheaper at Hannaford, which is the same price as at Family
    Dollar. I like Diet Coke. *But* when I go to Wal*Mart, I get the
    store brand and save about .40 per 2-liter. I do not get to Wal*Mart
    often, as it is not local for me, and I do not get into Bangor often.

    Even if I didn't look for deals, though, I would still pay less at
    IGA than Hannaford on the items that *I* purchase. On the other hand,
    my sister buys differently than I do, and would pay less at
    Hannaford. She buys mostly convenience foods, though. I do not buy
    too much for convenience foods, so that may make a difference. I'm
    not sure.

    K-Mart is a great place to by off-season clothes for kids. At least
    it was a few years back. During the winter I would buy almost all of
    the summer clothes that my daughters would need the next year there.
    During the summer I would buy a lot of winter clothes. You just have
    to be willing to look. I have also bought a feww things for me
    recently. Here are some examples:

    Kids pull-over sweaters - very nice ones - $1.00 each
    Girls pull-on (stretch) pants - .75-$1.00 each
    Kids shorts - .50-.75 each
    Kids Tee-Shirts - .75 each
    Kids tank tops - .25-.50 each
    Bras for Mom - $1.50 each
    Panties for mom - .50 each

    My girls didn't mind wearing t-shirts, tank tops and shorts being
    sold for boys, so that made it easier. They also would wear those
    three items as jammies, so that saved me even more money.

    Cat fooddry) I buy a large bag of dry food about once a month and
    we have 3 cats at 13 months old. I sometimes have to purchase another
    bag at the end of a month, it depends on how much they eat each
    week.I spend between $9.00 & $10.00 per purchase for dry food. They
    are not all that picky about it. I look for sales/coupons and buy the
    biggest bag at the cheapestest price.

    Cat Foodwet) Last winter my cats ate 4 cans of this a day between
    them, this spring, they cut themselves down to 1 to 1-1/2 cans a day
    between them. They are indoor cats. Does anyone know the reason for
    this? At any rate, they will only eat fancy feast (or the store
    brand) or sliced/carved 9 Lives. That is it, nothing else. Also, they
    will not eat tuna cat food, or ocean white fish. I am always looking
    for sales/coupons for the 9 Lives, fancy feast is just not economical
    as far as I can tell. This week, IGA is selling the 4 can packs of 9
    Lives for .99. They usually sell them for $1.19, I think, which is
    why I usually buy them at Hannaford for $1.09.

    Cat litter: I have found a huge savings on this one. We only use
    scoopable litter. We have the three cats, and two litter boxes that
    get scooped throughout the day, as well as cleaned right out, washed,
    etc once a week. We started out buying whatever litter was cheapest
    at the grocery store, but my cat will not poop in anything but
    scoopable litter. So, the grocery store sold the scoopable litter for
    almost $6.00 (14 lbs.). Whenever I went to Wal*Mart I would pick up
    20 lbs. for $7.00 or $8.00. *But, Sams club sells 40 pound containers
    for just under $8.00. I have found that we go through about 80 pounds
    a month, so Sams is our cheapest find for what we need. There is a
    big savings there.

    Well, that's all I have for now.

    Shannon
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