Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 12
  1. #1
    dash
    Guest

    Default Grinding your own wheat?


    <FONT face="RomanaTLig" color="#800000" size="5">Anyone grind their own wheat? Have any suggestions? What do you use to grind with? Is there any frugal way to grind wheat? dash



  2. #2
    Linda
    Guest

    Default Grinding your own wheat?

    I have ground my own wheat for about 30 years, and there is nothing

    like it!!! My first wheat grinder was a Magic Mill stone-grinder with

    a nice wooden case, I still have it and it is still my favorite. It's

    a nice little piece of furniture that you can proudly display in your

    kitchen. I have since updated to a Magic Mill 3 which has steel

    grinding blades and a plastic case, but I still love my first one the

    best. You can still find them on eBay, I'd watch them for a while to

    see what a fair price is, they don't make the original ones anymore,

    so they're getting hard to find. Whatever you go with it's hard to

    beat a stone grinder. You can adjust to fine or coarse grinds, that's

    important. These are the only 2 that I've used, so I can't comment on

    other brands.



    For bread you will need Hard Red Winter Wheat, for anything else like

    cakes or quick breads you will neat Soft Spring Wheat. You can also

    add Rye, Corn, or many other grains. You can't compare the homemade

    version with any flour you buy ready made. It's just so much better

    when you do it yourself!! It is more work, but such a rewarding

    experience! I also used to do all the kneading by hand, but let my

    Kitchen Aid (has to be a heavy duty mixer with a dough hook that will

    handle heavy doughs)do that for me now, depends on how "hands-on" you

    want to be. I also get the wheat at a Mennonite store (I'm in a rural

    area now), but many health and natural food stores carry it. I used to

    buy it in 50 lb. bags, but you can get in smaller amounts by the

    pound. It keeps a long time, but you'll need to store in tight fitting

    containers to protect it from "critters." If you have some left over

    that's already ground, you'll want to refrigerate or freeze it and use

    it soon, as the nutrients start deteriorating soon. You can still use

    it, it's just most nutritious fresh.I also buy my yeast in bulk and

    refrigerate it. So much cheaper than the individual packages.



    This is my first recipe and still the best:



    Whole Wheat Bread

    6 cups Whole Wheat Flour (hard wheat)

    1 1/2 Tblsp. Dry Yeast

    2 1/2 cups water, 110 degrees (very warm)

    1/3 cup Oil

    1/3 cup Honey

    1 Tblsp. Sea Salt

    1/4 cup Gluten Flour (helps but optional)

    250mg. Vitamin C (crush a tablet, helps to keep crumbs tighter, but

    also optional)



    Dissolve yeast in water, letting it sit 10 minutes. Add oil and

    honey. Add 3 cups flour, beat in. Add next 2 cups with salt and beat

    or knead in, along with gluten flour and Vitamin C. Add enough flour

    so dough is not sticky (or let it sit until it absorbs the flour).

    Knead until smooth and elastic, 30-45 minutes, if necessary (or use

    the Kitchen Aid and let it do the work!). Cover and let rise until

    double. Punch down and shape into 2 loaves and place into 2 oiled (I

    use a mixture of 2/3 liquid Lecithin to 1/3 oil)4 1/2" x 8 1/2" pans

    and let rise again. Bake in pre-heated oven at 375 degrees for about

    25 to 35 minutes, until done (tap it, should sound "hollow"). Remove

    from pans and cool on racks.



    This makes a delicious, soft bread that keeps well. I slice it and

    then freeze to take out as needed. Makes awesome toast for breakfast!

    Nothing like it ;o)



    Hope that helps,

    Linda









    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "dash" <dash4@...> wrote:

    >

    > Anyone grind their own wheat? Have any suggestions? What do you

    use to grind with? Is there any frugal way to grind wheat? dash

    >










  3. #3
    dash
    Guest

    Default Grinding your own wheat?


    <FONT face="RomanaTLig" color="#800000" size="5">
    <BLOCKQUOTE style="BORDER-LEFT: #800000 2px solid;">

    <FONT face="RomanaTLig" color="#800000" size="5">Thank you so very much for the wonderful post. I have a kitchen aide 600 professional model with the dough hook. I also use a bread machine too.
    <FONT face="RomanaTLig" color="#800000" size="5">
    <FONT face="RomanaTLig" color="#800000" size="5">I have both the red hard wheat...and boy is it hard... and the regular one... I have been making my own bread for years but have been buying the whole wheat flourand driving 60 miles one wayto get it...NOW I can go 20 miles and get the wheat berries.....I am so thrilled..... I am printing out your email, thanks again!!! dash

    I have ground my own wheat for about 30 years, and there is nothing
    like it!!! My first wheat grinder was a Magic Mill stone-grinder with




  4. #4
    Linda
    Guest

    Default Grinding your own wheat?

    Your very welcome!!! If you'd like to actually see that nice old

    wooden model Magic Mill in action, here's a link to a YouTube video of

    someone who actually has one for sale on eBay, it's exactly like the

    one I've got. It looks like they've been selling for around $150 to

    $200 (not including shipping). I remember I paid $175 for mine used

    back in the 70's from a Magic Mill store.



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gbu58KbeNcA





    Hope the link works ok.

    Good luck!

    Linda











    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "dash" <dash4@...> wrote:

    >

    >

    >

    > Thank you so very much for the wonderful post. I have a kitchen

    aide 600 professional model with the dough hook. I also use a bread

    machine too.

    >

    > I have both the red hard wheat...and boy is it hard... and the

    regular one... I have been making my own bread for years but have been

    buying the whole wheat flour and driving 60 miles one way to get

    it...NOW I can go 20 miles and get the wheat berries.....I am so

    thrilled..... I am printing out your email, thanks again!!! dash

    >

    >

    > I have ground my own wheat for about 30 years, and there is nothing

    > like it!!! My first wheat grinder was a Magic Mill stone-grinder with

    >










  5. #5
    dash
    Guest

    Default Grinding your own wheat?


    <FONT face="RomanaTLig" color="#800000" size="5">Thank you. It did work. It looks wonderful. How long does it take to grind like 5# of hard red wheat berries? dash
    <BLOCKQUOTE style="BORDER-LEFT: #800000 2px solid;">
    <FONT face="RomanaTLig" color="#800000" size="5">
    $200 (not including shipping). I remember I paid $175 for mine used
    back in the 70's from a Magic Mill store.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gbu58KbeNcA




  6. #6
    Linda
    Guest

    Default Grinding your own wheat?



    If I had to guess, I'd say probably around 15-20 minutes, give or take

    a few. You don't have to stand there with it, just listen for it to

    finish. On the video it shows her pouring in 1 cup. I pour in around 3

    or 4 cups at one time (start the machine before you add the wheat) and

    then just keep adding as needed. It also depends on how fine you grind

    it. For bread you'll want it pretty fine, but not at the finest

    setting. You'll also need to check your pan and not let it overfill,

    you may have to empty it a couple times during that 5 lbs. The flour

    will come out nice and warm too! That stone mill will grind it much

    faster than the newer ones with the steel blades. I like it so much

    better! The nice thing is, you can also grind your cornmeal just the

    way you like it and crack grains to add to your breads or to make hot

    cereals (like the 7-grain cereal that you cook from the natural foods

    stores). There's an adjustment on the back of the motor for the

    stones. I would grind up about 5 lbs at a time and keep it in a

    Tupperware container in my fridge. I also bought a new cheap 1 1/2"

    paintbrush to clean the mill with, it's really easy, you just brush

    the flour down anywhere it clings to the machine into the pan below. I

    would also open the stones all the way (for coarse grind) at the end

    after you empty out all of your flour and replace the pan and let it

    run a minute or 2 to chase out any bits left in the stones. It has a

    really powerful motor, but if the electricity goes out or you just

    really feel like a hands on experience, it has a hand-crack (make sure

    it comes with yours if you do buy one and want that).



    I had a dog that loved getting crumbs of that bread so much that she

    would run into the kitchen as soon as the mill started and sit and

    wait (for hours!) until it was done! It was so cute!



    I did notice several for sale on eBay, I just did a search for "Magic

    Mill" and they all popped up. Let me know if you have any more

    questions, I'd be happy to answer them!



    Linda















    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "dash" <dash4@...> wrote:

    >

    > Thank you. It did work. It looks wonderful. How long does it

    take to grind like 5# of hard red wheat berries? dash

    >

    >

    > $200 (not including shipping). I remember I paid $175 for mine used

    > back in the 70's from a Magic Mill store.

    >

    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gbu58KbeNcA

    >










  7. #7
    T. Hembree
    Guest

    Default Grinding your own wheat?


    Hey there,

    I grind my own wheat. I really enjoy the whole process. My bread just tastes awful!!!!!!!!!!!! We use a plastic/stainless steel wheat grinder I bought from Leahmans years ago. My Aunt grinds hers in her old blender and her bread is better than mine!

    Have you tried your blender?
    Thx
    Tonya



  8. #8
    lassenfam@peoplepc.com>
    Guest

    Default Grinding your own wheat?


    I really like the recipe for wheat bread that is on the urban homemakers website. I'm not sure what the website address is, but if yougoogle it you will find it.

    I have been making our bread (with grinding the wheat) for over a year now. Our family just loves it. In fact when we go on vacation our 4 year old starts saying after a couple of days that she wants to go home because she misses home-made bread. I started out using the recipe from the urban home-makers website, and we loved it so much I have never tried anything else.

    I use a Wonder Mill, and a Bosch mixer. They are expensive, but they pay for themselves very quickly in saved money and in better health.

    Hope this helps!
    Leah



 

 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •