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  1. #1
    brown_eyed_girl375
    Guest

    Default Getting Bread to rise - need help

    I have been trying to bake my own bread for awhile, and no matter what

    I seem to do I can not seem to get the bread to rise the way it is

    supposed to. I have no idea what is wrong. I use a thermometer to

    make sure that the water is the right temperature. The yeast is

    always fresh (often used the same day I purchase, in fact). I let it

    sit in a warm place that is around 80 or so degrees, but nothing.

    I've tried different recipies, etc but still no luck. I've never

    actually seen anyone making bread, so I don't know what it is that I'm

    doing wrong. The bread doesn't taste bad when I cook it. It's just a

    bit flat and very dense. It does rise slightly, but nothing like what

    it is supposed to. Any suggestions????









  2. #2
    jacqueline osgood
    Guest

    Default Getting Bread to rise - need help



    Brown eyed girl'





    Try these things one at a time. Add more liquid in small amounts making your dough a little less dense.





    Make sure that you include the sugar or honey for the yeast to eat.





    Be sure to grease the dough beforeit rises so that it doesn't form a skin.





    Let it rise until it has doubles in size. even if it takes twice as long as the recipe recommends.





    Hope that one of these helps.

    --- On Mon, 7/21/08, brown_eyed_girl375 <cmbgrimes@yahoo.com> wrote:

    From: brown_eyed_girl375 <cmbgrimes@yahoo.com>
    Subject: Budget101.com : Getting Bread to rise - need help
    To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com
    Date: Monday, July 21, 2008, 7:34 AM


    <DIV id="yiv1845199665">



    I have been trying to bake my own bread for awhile, and no matter what
    I seem to do I can not seem to get the bread to rise the way it is
    supposed to. I have no idea what is wrong. I use a thermometer to
    make sure that the water is the right temperature. The yeast is
    always fresh (often used the same day I purchase, in fact). I let it
    sit in a warm place that is around 80 or so degrees, but nothing.
    I've tried different recipies, etc but still no luck. I've never
    actually seen anyone making bread, so I don't know what it is that I'm
    doing wrong. The bread doesn't taste bad when I cook it. It's just a
    bit flat and very dense. It does rise slightly, but nothing like what
    it is supposed to. Any suggestions? ???






  3. #3
    Clarice
    Guest

    Default Getting Bread to rise - need help

    I've also been baking as much of my own bread as I can as well as

    hamburger and hot dog buns. I've been a little afraid to do it

    entirely on my own so I have been "cheating" a little bit by letting my

    bread maker make the dough for me and then baking it in the oven. So

    far everything has turned out great. I go to a Mennonite bulk store to

    load up on all kinds of flour and spices very inexpensively so I feel

    like I'm saving money on bread items. The only problem is that it all

    tastes so great that I'm afraid that I've started to gain weight.



    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "brown_eyed_girl375" <cmbgrimes@...>

    wrote:

    >

    > I have been trying to bake my own bread for awhile, and no matter

    what

    > I seem to do I can not seem to get the bread to rise the way it is

    > supposed to. I have no idea what is wrong. I use a thermometer to

    > make sure that the water is the right temperature. The yeast is

    > always fresh (often used the same day I purchase, in fact). I let it

    > sit in a warm place that is around 80 or so degrees, but nothing.

    > I've tried different recipies, etc but still no luck. I've never

    > actually seen anyone making bread, so I don't know what it is that

    I'm

    > doing wrong. The bread doesn't taste bad when I cook it. It's just

    a

    > bit flat and very dense. It does rise slightly, but nothing like

    what

    > it is supposed to. Any suggestions????

    >










  4. #4
    Char
    Guest

    Default Getting Bread to rise - need help


    <FONT color="#008080">What about not usingf warm water - but putting the bread in a warm place to rise.
    <FONT color="#008080">I dunno - I use a bread machine and haven't had any problems. I just dump everything in thr machine and set it to the dough setting. When done, dump the dough out, shape it, let it rise again for 30 mins to a couple of hours, then cook it.
    <FONT color="#008080">Are you at a high altitude? You may need to use special instructions if you are.
    <FONT color="#008080">
    ----- Original Message ----- <DIV style="BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4;">From: brown_eyed_girl375
    To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Monday, July 21, 2008 7:34 AM
    Subject: Budget101.com : Getting Bread to rise - need help

    <FONT color="#008080">I have been trying to bake my own bread for awhile, and no matter what I seem to do I can not seem to get the bread to rise the way it is supposed to.



  5. #5
    brown_eyed_girl375
    Guest

    Default Getting Bread to rise - need help

    Thanks for some of your suggestions. Unfortunately, I've already

    tried most of them. I even bought a bread machine and had the same

    problem. I ended up with a little brown brick, so I got rid of it.

    I don't live in what is considered a hight altitude and I've tried

    letting it sit in a warm oven, warm car, etc. It's like I'm jinxed!





    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "Char" <carmstr1@...> wrote:

    >

    > What about not usingf warm water - but putting the bread in a warm

    place to rise.

    > I dunno - I use a bread machine and haven't had any problems. I

    just dump everything in thr machine and set it to the dough

    setting. When done, dump the dough out, shape it, let it rise again

    for 30 mins to a couple of hours, then cook it.

    > Are you at a high altitude? You may need to use special

    instructions if you are.

    >

    > ----- Original Message -----

    > From: brown_eyed_girl375

    > To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com

    > Sent: Monday, July 21, 2008 7:34 AM

    > Subject: Budget101.com : Getting Bread to rise - need help

    >

    > I have been trying to bake my own bread for awhile, and no matter

    what I seem to do I can not seem to get the bread to rise the way it

    is supposed to.

    >










  6. #6
    Hope Ware
    Guest

    Default Getting Bread to rise - need help

    If you are using whole wheat flour you will need to add vital gluten to

    get a higher loaf that is less dense and more like "supermarket" bread.

    You also need to be sure that you are not adding TOO much flour. This

    is a much more common mistake than adding too little flour. Don't be

    afraid of oil. Oil your hands to knead the dough. This will keep it

    from sticking to your hands. Be sure you knead long enough to activate

    the gluten in the flour. The gluten is what makes the dough stretchy.

    However, don't overknead it either. If you are using an electric mixer

    - like a Kitchenaid with a kneading hook, then set a timer while the

    dough is being kneaded. This way you'll keep track of the time and not

    under or over knead. The dough should come away from the sides of the

    mixer when kneading.



    Another important step is to let the dough sponge - This means letting

    it sit for 15 to 30 minutes or so at the beginning of the recipe. Add

    your entire amount of water to the yeast. Add your sugar and about

    1/3 of the entire amount of flour. I make 5 loaves at a time. That's

    15 cups of total flour. So, I add THREE cups of flour to the yeast,

    water, and sugar (whether you use honey or regular sugar). Then walk

    away for 15-30 minutes and let it sit. When you come back, complete

    the rest of the recipe as usual. This step will increase the rise of

    your loaf and give you better loaves that won't crumble. It will slice

    nicely for sandwiches.



    Another idea is to weigh your dough before shaping it into loaves. I

    don't do this. But, a friend who has been making bread for 20 years

    still weighs her dough. When she gets ready to shape each loaf after

    the first rise, she takes an amount of dough from the whole batch and

    weighs the ball of dough to be sure she is using the same amount of

    dough for each loaf. She gets beautiful loaves that are very uniform

    in size that way.



    I've been grinding grain for several years and making all of our bread.

    It took a few really dense loaves to begin to get the right mixture of

    flour to water for the loaves to turn out right.



    Good luck.



    Hope64












  7. #7
    jacqueline osgood
    Guest

    Default Getting Bread to rise - need help

    Clarice'



    What state do you live in. I live in Gulfport, Ms. I'm not aware of a

    Mennonite store near here.



    Thanks,

    Jacki



    --- On Mon, 7/21/08, Clarice <frugal_bugle@yahoo.com> wrote:



    From: Clarice

    Subject: Budget101.com : Re: Getting Bread to rise - need help

    To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com

    Date: Monday, July 21, 2008, 5:48 PM





    I've also been baking as much of my own bread as I can as well as

    hamburger and hot dog buns.






  8. #8
    J Diane Northcutt
    Guest

    Default Getting Bread to rise - need help

    Which type of yeast are you using? How much yeast are you using?

    ----- Original Message -----

    From: brown_eyed_girl375

    Subject: Re: Budget101.com : Getting Bread to rise - need help





    Thanks for some of your suggestions. Unfortunately, I've already

    tried most of them. I even bought a bread machine and had the same

    problem.






 

 
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