Five Cool Make-it-Yourself Garden Gadgets

Five Cool Make-it-Yourself Garden Gadgets

<SPAN class="140284810-01072008">adapted from Great Garden Gadgets, a Rodale Organic Gardening Book. <DIV class="story_wrapper"> A great garden gadget is an exciting find. You spot them occasionally in garden catalogs or at your local garden center, but the best gadgets are the nifty homemade

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  1. #1
    Liss
    Guest

    Default Five Cool Make-it-Yourself Garden Gadgets





    <SPAN class="140284810-01072008">adapted from Great Garden Gadgets, a Rodale Organic Gardening Book.
    <DIV class="story_wrapper">


    A great garden gadget is an exciting find. You spot them occasionally in garden catalogs or at your local garden center, but the best gadgets are the nifty homemade widgets that your friends have devised.


    You know what we mean — a planter made from a milk jug and a piece of plastic pipe, a plastic soda bottle modified to be a watering reservoir, pieces of plastic miniblinds recycled as plant markers.


    Here is a small sampling from this book, of how to make some nifty gizmos! Here are some tips to help your birds using old door mats, and cracked old concrete birdbaths; cool lantern delights for outdoor lighting, using baby food jars; a string holder, and more!


    LANTERN DELIGHTS
    Clean 4- 6- ounce baby food jars.


    Materials
    6 to 12 clean baby food jars
    Spool of fine-gauge wire (not plastic coated)
    6 to 12 voltive candles


    Directions
    1. For each jar, cut a piece of wire 40 to 50 inches long. Vary your lengths so your finished lights can hang at different heights.
    2. Bend a wire in half to form a V-shaped handle for the jar. Hold the bent wire over a jar so 6 to 10 inches of the V extends above the jar for hanging. Wrap the rest of the wire around the threads of the jar mouth.
    3. Twist each end of the wire around the V-shaped handle to fasten the wire securely. Pull tight.
    4. Place a voltive candle in the jar, light, and hang!


    GROUND LEVEL BIRD FEEDER AND SANCTUARY
    On hand: Old craced concerete birdbath without its base.
    Turn it into: Ground-level bird feeder and sanctuary.
    How to do it: Dig a slight depression in a flowerbed and set in the birdbath saucer. Place a little bowl of water or fruit in the middle and pour seed around it.


    BIRDSEED CATCHER
    On hand: Old door mat
    Turn it into: Birdseed catcher
    How to do it: Put a scrap of door mat under the bird feeder and on top of fresh snow so seed falls on it and not into the snow where the birds can’t get to them.


    TOOL STORAGE CHEST
    On hand: Old filing cabinet
    Turn it into: Tool storage chest
    How to do it: An old metal or wooden file cabinet makes a great place to store hand tools, pruning tools, string, gloves, and all kinds of miscellaneous garden items.


    DAHLIA TUBER HOLDER
    On hand: Plastic strawberry flats
    Turn them into: Dahlia tuber holders
    How to do it: In early winter when frost has killed dahlia foliage, lift the tubers and shake off the soil. Then line each of the flat’s compartments with a paper towel, et in the tubers — one per cubbyhole — and put the flat in a cool, dark place. The rectangular flats stack easily so they won’t take up much space, and the ventilated sides will keep needed air circulating to the tubers all winter long.


    STRING CADDY
    On hand; Plastic detergent bottle
    Turn them into: String caddy
    How to do it: Cut a hinged flap into the side of a plastic bottle, baking it large enough to slide the string cone in. Stick a couple pieces of Velcro on the flap so you can open and close it. Poke a hole through the cap, and slide the string out the top.





    <SPAN class="140284810-01072008">source Care 2



  2. #2
    Wanda
    Guest

    Default Five Cool Make-it-Yourself Garden Gadgets

    Thanks for the ideas for the garden gadgets...Does anyone have any

    other thrifty ideas for items in the yard or garden.......I like to

    use different old water cans to plant in and use small mini lights

    some evenings also.



    Wanda

    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "Liss" <liss@...> wrote:

    >

    > adapted from Great Garden Gadgets, a Rodale Organic Gardening Book.

    >

    > A great garden gadget is an exciting find. You spot them

    occasionally in

    > garden catalogs or at your local garden center, but the best

    gadgets are the

    > nifty homemade widgets that your friends have devised.

    >

    > You know what we mean - a planter made from a milk jug and a piece

    of

    > plastic pipe, a plastic soda bottle modified to be a watering

    reservoir,

    > pieces of plastic miniblinds recycled as plant markers.

    >

    > Here is a small sampling from this book, of how to make some nifty

    gizmos!

    > Here are some tips to help your birds using old door mats, and

    cracked old

    > concrete birdbaths; cool lantern delights for outdoor lighting,

    using baby

    > food jars; a string holder, and more!

    >

    > LANTERN DELIGHTS

    > Clean 4- 6- ounce baby food jars.

    >

    > Materials

    > 6 to 12 clean baby food jars

    > Spool of fine-gauge wire (not plastic coated)

    > 6 to 12 voltive candles

    >

    > Directions

    > 1. For each jar, cut a piece of wire 40 to 50 inches long. Vary

    your lengths

    > so your finished lights can hang at different heights.

    > 2. Bend a wire in half to form a V-shaped handle for the jar. Hold

    the bent

    > wire over a jar so 6 to 10 inches of the V extends above the jar for

    > hanging. Wrap the rest of the wire around the threads of the jar

    mouth.

    > 3. Twist each end of the wire around the V-shaped handle to fasten

    the wire

    > securely. Pull tight.

    > 4. Place a voltive candle in the jar, light, and hang!

    >

    > GROUND LEVEL BIRD FEEDER AND SANCTUARY

    > On hand: Old craced concerete birdbath without its base.

    > Turn it into: Ground-level bird feeder and sanctuary.

    > How to do it: Dig a slight depression in a flowerbed and set in the

    birdbath

    > saucer. Place a little bowl of water or fruit in the middle and

    pour seed

    > around it.

    >

    > BIRDSEED CATCHER

    > On hand: Old door mat

    > Turn it into: Birdseed catcher

    > How to do it: Put a scrap of door mat under the bird feeder and on

    top of

    > fresh snow so seed falls on it and not into the snow where the

    birds can't

    > get to them.

    >

    > TOOL STORAGE CHEST

    > On hand: Old filing cabinet

    > Turn it into: Tool storage chest

    > How to do it: An old metal or wooden file cabinet makes a great

    place to

    > store hand tools, pruning tools, string, gloves, and all kinds of

    > miscellaneous garden items.

    >

    > DAHLIA TUBER HOLDER

    > On hand: Plastic strawberry flats

    > Turn them into: Dahlia tuber holders

    > How to do it: In early winter when frost has killed dahlia foliage,

    lift the

    > tubers and shake off the soil. Then line each of the flat's

    compartments

    > with a paper towel, et in the tubers - one per cubbyhole - and put

    the flat

    > in a cool, dark place. The rectangular flats stack easily so they

    won't take

    > up much space, and the ventilated sides will keep needed air

    circulating to

    > the tubers all winter long.

    >

    > STRING CADDY

    > On hand; Plastic detergent bottle

    > Turn them into: String caddy

    > How to do it: Cut a hinged flap into the side of a plastic bottle,

    baking it

    > large enough to slide the string cone in. Stick a couple pieces of

    Velcro on

    > the flap so you can open and close it. Poke a hole through the cap,

    and

    > slide the string out the top.

    >

    >

    >

    > source Care 2

    >










  3. #3
    Wanda Good
    Guest

    Default Five Cool Make-it-Yourself Garden Gadgets

    I hope this isn't a repeat posting, but I tried before to post this and it might not have worked out. I was interested in knowing if anyone has any other thrifty ideas for yard and garden ideas to display either for birds, or just an different type of items to use and easy to make. I liked the posting already here, but have a large area that I can display many things. Thanks loads, Wanda

    &#32;



  4. #4
    lisa griffeth
    Guest

    Default Five Cool Make-it-Yourself Garden Gadgets



    Not sure what was posted already but I took a large pot (huge actually, but cracked/split and no good for plants) turned it upside down and bolted a plant saucer to the top of the upside down potthru the drain holes (used a washer to make it stay put) and I use it as a bird/squirrel feeder by filling the saucer w/seeds and the cracked bottom pot makes a good toad house (they go in to the shade thru the chipped/cracked area.





    Hey, it was <free>, ok?LOL





    Lisa G.

    --- On Tue, 7/1/08, Wanda Good <wlgood43@yahoo.com> wrote:

    From: Wanda Good <wlgood43@yahoo.com>
    Subject: Budget101.com : Re:Five Cool Make-it-Yourself Garden Gadgets
    To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com
    Date: Tuesday, July 1, 2008, 10:50 AM


    <DIV id="yiv1132105803">




    I hope this isn't a repeat posting, but I tried before to post this and it might not have worked out.
    I was interested in knowing if anyone has any other thrifty ideas for yard and garden ideas to display either for birds, or just an different type of items to use and easy to make.
    I liked the posting already here, but have a large area that I can display many things.
    Thanks loads, Wanda







  5. #5
    Ann Garner
    Guest

    Default Five Cool Make-it-Yourself Garden Gadgets

    We have used 2 disposable pie pans to make a bird feeder. Place the

    2 pans together so you have a bit more strength, then use a paper

    punch or nail or something to punch 4 holes equally spaced around the

    edge of the pans. String cord through the pans and hang, then fill

    with seed. You can also staple wire clothes hangers on each side of

    the pans and use the hooks to hang from a tree limb.



    Use a large plastic bottle or jug for trickle watering of

    plants. Punch a small hole in the bottom of the bottle of jug. Fill

    with water with the container outside, and place where you want to

    trickle water the plants.



    Ann in Arkansas










 

 

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