Mash Potato Bread- Left Over Layering

1/2 cup mashed potatoes 3 to 4 cups all-purpose unbleached flour 3/4 cup water 1/2 cup sour cream 2 teaspoons instant yeast 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup cooked bacon (optional) 1/2 cup chopped fresh chives (optional) this makes 1 large loaf or 2 small loaves

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    Default Mash Potato Bread


    1/2 cup mashed potatoes
    3 to 4 cups all-purpose unbleached flour
    3/4 cup water
    1/2 cup sour cream
    2 teaspoons instant yeast
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/4 cup cooked bacon (optional)
    1/2 cup chopped fresh chives (optional)

    this makes 1 large loaf or 2 small loaves

    chop up two or three slices of bacon and fry them up. Remove them from the heat.

    Mix the mashed potatoes, yeast, salt, and 2 cups of the flour together in a large mixing bowl or the bowl of an electric mixer.

    Add the sour cream, water, chives, and bacon and mix together until all ingredients are combined.

    At this point you'll have a very wet, sticky mess, probably more of a batter than a dough. Add additional flour a handful (1/8 cup) at a time and mix or knead it in.

    Once you have combined the ingredients well and gotten the balance of flour and water to a level that seems acceptable, return the dough to a well-oiled bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and allow the dough to rise for 90 minutes at room temperature or until it has doubled in size.

    Remove the dough from the bowl and shape the loaf or loaves.

    shape the loaves, cover them loosely and let them rise until they double in size again, about 45 minutes. You could put them in greased baking pans and let them rise and bake them in those.

    While the loaves are rising again, preheat the oven to 425. If you have a baking stone, be sure to put it in early to heat.


    When they have doubled in size (as I said before, about 45 minutes after shaping), put the loaves in the oven to bake. I baked them at 425 for 5 minutes and then reduce the temperature to 350 and baked them another half an hour.

    The loaves are done when the internal temperature reaches the 185 to 195 degree range (as read with an instant-read thermometer) or when they are nice and brown on the outside and sound hollow when tapped on the bottom. For me this took about 35 minutes.

    ~*~

    I used some of my left over mash potatoes to make gnocchi ...


    Usually my family is not keen on leftovers of any kind, and that's very frustrating!!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    this sounds really good. I have to put this on my list of things to make.

    I love cookbooks and recipes. I am going to weigh a ton by the end of the year.

    I do have a question about bread but off of this topic a little, I hope you don't mind me asking. I see some recipes call for a second raising before you shape it onto a loaf for the final rising before baking. why the extra rise? would it really make a difference with the bread and if so, how?

    Thank you for letting me pick you brain a little.

    Ann

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    the first rise allows the doubling to make more than 1 or 2 -- the second rise (to my understanding) is to allow more air to incorporate into the product, so that when it's baked, it's not like a brick or a weapon in the event you feel the need to wing it at someone...

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    The second rise is to create a finer gluten "web". This gives a smaller crumb and helps prevent very large air pockets/holes from forming in the bread when baked.
    ~Life is not measured by how many breaths we take, but how many times our breaths are taken away!~

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    Thank you, that makes sense. I think the next time I make bread I am going to let it raise twice before shaping it into loaves.

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    Quote Originally Posted by Shellc1971 View Post
    The second rise is to create a finer gluten "web". This gives a smaller crumb and helps prevent very large air pockets/holes from forming in the bread when baked.
    hmm that's a different definition than what my Culinary books say... but ok.
    Only in the United States is it permissible to sell food without the labeling of Genetically Modified Organisms. This needs to stop, we DESERVE to know what is in our food!

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    Quote Originally Posted by CulArtStudent View Post
    the first rise allows the doubling to make more than 1 or 2 -- the second rise (to my understanding) is to allow more air to incorporate into the product, so that when it's baked, it's not like a brick or a weapon in the event you feel the need to wing it at someone...
    Completely off topic, but when I read this, I laughed so hard I almost fell out of the chair.
    At the same time, while laughing, BOTH my dogs came running and barking to me, as if there was something -serious- happening.
    Just made me laugh harder...

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    one raise if you NEED a weapon...(there have been times)
    two if you want it edible
    three if you want it really soft like store bought... got it.

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    Quote Originally Posted by CulArtStudent View Post
    hmm that's a different definition than what my Culinary books say... but ok.
    Per finecooking.com (and very similar to what Julia Child says in her cookbooks when baking bread)

    [when asked about why the second rise of dough]
    Texture, mostly, though a bit of flavor as well.
    Okay, so most bread recipes go something like this: mix ingredients, knead dough, let rise, shape, let rise again, bake. There's a lot of stuff in-between, usually just refinements of those steps, but those are the big important ones. The second rise is optional, though, depending on what kind of bread you're making. So, let's go through each.
    Mix Ingredients. This is relatively self-explanitory, but you want to ensure that everything is pretty evenly distributed before you start the real work.
    Knead Dough. This is kind of an optional step, although its results are not optional. The goal with kneading is to form gluten. Gluten is a molecule that's created when you combine two proteins from flour, glutenin and gliadin, with water. The quickest way to form the gluten is to agitate it physically (not emotionally, nobody likes annoyed gluten). If you have a reasonably wet dough, you don't need to do any physical agitation, you can just throw it in the fridge for eight hours or so and gluten will form on its own (this is what's behind the no-knead bread craze). Still, gluten needs to form by one method or another.
    Let Rise. This step is also called "proofing," because if the dough rises, you've proven that the yeast is alive. The main purpose of this step is to convert sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide by way of the yeast.
    Shape. Before the dough is baked, you will want to give it a form. This form is probably going to determine if you move to step 5 or just do a quick rest and bake. A thin pain ŕ l'anciennes wants to develop completely in the oven, so its shape is kind of a freeform stick. A sandwich bread is a light and puffy thing in a pan, with its size pretty well restrained, so it wants more time to develop.
    Second Rise. If you've rolled your bread into a tube and placed it into a pan, you'll likely want to see the top of the bread crest the pan. "Oven spring"—the rise that the bread gets from the air bubbles in the dough expanding when they hit oven temperatures—will only get you part way up the pan. In order to do a nice, mushroom-shaped slice of bread, you're going to want to give the dough a chance to get pretty close to the top of the pan before you put it in the oven. A second rise achieves this, and it also gives your bread a chance to be fluffier than if you skipped this step. You'll get a bit more flavor development as well, as the yeast is still eating the sugar, but the difference won't be so dramatic compared to the difference between virgin dough and dough after its first rise.
    ~Life is not measured by how many breaths we take, but how many times our breaths are taken away!~

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    ShellC -- I have no time to banter with you -- my point remains the same -- it's not what my culinary arts books say (regardless of whether it's correct or not)...and until such time as the reincarnation of Julia Child comes to teach my courses for my degree, I will have to stick with what I am learning in school ...it's all for the grade baby, it's all for the grade.

    Maybe when my semester is finally over (it's hell for the next 4 weeks with finals), I will scan that portion of my Culinary Arts book and share it with you. In the meantime, whatever it means, it means, and they mean it when they say it.
    Only in the United States is it permissible to sell food without the labeling of Genetically Modified Organisms. This needs to stop, we DESERVE to know what is in our food!

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    I am making bread tomorrow unless I get lazy then it will be Wednesday. I am going to let the bread raise 3 times to see what happens. cross your fingers for me.

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    Quote Originally Posted by CulArtStudent View Post
    ShellC -- I have no time to banter with you -- my point remains the same -- it's not what my culinary arts books say (regardless of whether it's correct or not)...and until such time as the reincarnation of Julia Child comes to teach my courses for my degree, I will have to stick with what I am learning in school ...it's all for the grade baby, it's all for the grade.
    Nice to see you "found time to banter" with two paragraphs

    You point is well taken and mine is just as valid and correct. Your books may say one thing, but my chef instructors at LeCordon Bleu say the same as I posted. See...you aren't the only one in Culinary school!
    ~Life is not measured by how many breaths we take, but how many times our breaths are taken away!~

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    Oh, this sounds so good. My family loves homemade bread. I can't wait to try this new recipe on them!

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread


    this bread is served at Brio's Tuscan Grille --

    for locations nearest you (in case you don't want to make it on your own):

    Find a BRIO Location
    Only in the United States is it permissible to sell food without the labeling of Genetically Modified Organisms. This needs to stop, we DESERVE to know what is in our food!

 

 

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