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  1. #1
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    Default Mash Potato Bread

    1/2 cup mashed potatoes
    3 to 4 cups all-purpose unbleached flour
    3/4 cup water
    1/2 cup sour cream
    2 teaspoons instant yeast
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/4 cup cooked bacon (optional)
    1/2 cup chopped fresh chives (optional)

    this makes 1 large loaf or 2 small loaves

    chop up two or three slices of bacon and fry them up. Remove them from the heat.

    Mix the mashed potatoes, yeast, salt, and 2 cups of the flour together in a large mixing bowl or the bowl of an electric mixer.

    Add the sour cream, water, chives, and bacon and mix together until all ingredients are combined.

    At this point you'll have a very wet, sticky mess, probably more of a batter than a dough. Add additional flour a handful (1/8 cup) at a time and mix or knead it in.

    Once you have combined the ingredients well and gotten the balance of flour and water to a level that seems acceptable, return the dough to a well-oiled bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and allow the dough to rise for 90 minutes at room temperature or until it has doubled in size.

    Remove the dough from the bowl and shape the loaf or loaves.

    shape the loaves, cover them loosely and let them rise until they double in size again, about 45 minutes. You could put them in greased baking pans and let them rise and bake them in those.

    While the loaves are rising again, preheat the oven to 425. If you have a baking stone, be sure to put it in early to heat.


    When they have doubled in size (as I said before, about 45 minutes after shaping), put the loaves in the oven to bake. I baked them at 425 for 5 minutes and then reduce the temperature to 350 and baked them another half an hour.

    The loaves are done when the internal temperature reaches the 185 to 195 degree range (as read with an instant-read thermometer) or when they are nice and brown on the outside and sound hollow when tapped on the bottom. For me this took about 35 minutes.

    ~*~

    I used some of my left over mash potatoes to make gnocchi ...


    Usually my family is not keen on leftovers of any kind, and that's very frustrating!!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread

    this sounds really good. I have to put this on my list of things to make.

    I love cookbooks and recipes. I am going to weigh a ton by the end of the year.

    I do have a question about bread but off of this topic a little, I hope you don't mind me asking. I see some recipes call for a second raising before you shape it onto a loaf for the final rising before baking. why the extra rise? would it really make a difference with the bread and if so, how?

    Thank you for letting me pick you brain a little.

    Ann

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread

    the first rise allows the doubling to make more than 1 or 2 -- the second rise (to my understanding) is to allow more air to incorporate into the product, so that when it's baked, it's not like a brick or a weapon in the event you feel the need to wing it at someone...

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread

    The second rise is to create a finer gluten "web". This gives a smaller crumb and helps prevent very large air pockets/holes from forming in the bread when baked.
    ~Life is not measured by how many breaths we take, but how many times our breaths are taken away!~

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread

    Thank you, that makes sense. I think the next time I make bread I am going to let it raise twice before shaping it into loaves.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread

    Quote Originally Posted by Shellc1971 View Post
    The second rise is to create a finer gluten "web". This gives a smaller crumb and helps prevent very large air pockets/holes from forming in the bread when baked.
    hmm that's a different definition than what my Culinary books say... but ok.
    Only in the United States is it permissible to sell food without the labeling of Genetically Modified Organisms. This needs to stop, we DESERVE to know what is in our food!

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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread

    Quote Originally Posted by CulArtStudent View Post
    the first rise allows the doubling to make more than 1 or 2 -- the second rise (to my understanding) is to allow more air to incorporate into the product, so that when it's baked, it's not like a brick or a weapon in the event you feel the need to wing it at someone...
    Completely off topic, but when I read this, I laughed so hard I almost fell out of the chair.
    At the same time, while laughing, BOTH my dogs came running and barking to me, as if there was something -serious- happening.
    Just made me laugh harder...

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Mash Potato Bread

    one raise if you NEED a weapon...(there have been times)
    two if you want it edible
    three if you want it really soft like store bought... got it.

 

 
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