Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 12
  1. #1
    shawnonline
    Guest

    Default Our Kids Financial Future


    I was thinking about something that may be helpful to our children's future. I wonder why personal finance and budgetingisn't taught in high school. This would be of great benefit to them and all americans over the long term.

    I remember I took an engineering economics class in college. I learned more about savings in that class than anything and it was very veryeye opening to me. I didn't become an engineer (I am a computer programmer), but this was so useful to me.

    I think this would help our kids overthe long term. It seems to me that I have learned the most about saving and budgeting from my Grandma's generation (I'm 33 and she is 86). Also my mother teaching me how to balance a checkbook when I was a teen was great. I didn't learn much about saving from my parents since they still struggle with it, but have strong tendency to save.

    I think our children in general right now are only learning from my generation of getting everything they want and how to pile up debt. Most teenagers have cell phones and spend all of their money from their part time jobs. In high school I saved up $3000 for college myself and that was from only working summers and a paper routeuntil I was 18.

    Thanks,

    Shawn



  2. #2
    Nancy
    Guest

    Default Our Kids Financial Future


    If the school doesn't teach this, then the parents should. Actually the parents should teach the kids from an early age.

    The public schools can only do so much, especially when you consider that half (or more) of class time is spent just trying to keep order.

    Nancy

    [quote]
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: shawnonline

    I was thinking about something that may be helpful to our children's future. I wonder why personal finance and budgetingisn't taught in high school. This would be of great benefit to them and all americans over the long term.



  3. #3
    Shawn
    Guest

    Default Our Kids Financial Future

    <div style="font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:10pt;"><DIV style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt;FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif;">Totally agreed.
    <DIV style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt;FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif;">


    ----- Original Message ----
    From: Nancy <nancyr@ntin.net>
    To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Monday, May 5, 2008 12:00:40 PM
    Subject: Re: Budget101.com : Our Kids Financial Future


    If the school doesn't teach this, then the parents should. Actually the parents should teach the kids from an early age.

    The public schools can only do so much, especially when you consider that half (or more) of class time is spent just trying to keep order.

    Nancy

    [quote]
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: shawnonline

    I was thinking about something that may be helpful to our children's future. I wonder why personal finance and budgetingisn't taught in high school. This would be of great benefit to them and all americans over the long term.


  4. #4
    lisa griffeth
    Guest

    Default Our Kids Financial Future



    As far as I'm concerned, the Parents are responsible for teaching them to have reasonable manners so thatTeachers don't need to spend 1/2 of the class time maintaining order...Teachers are supposed to teach- they aren't required to parent! A good bit of what children need to know should be taught at home by Parents or extended family members.





    Some Parents think schools are supposed to do everythinginvolved in raising a child for them....just having a child doesn't make you a Parent. Being a good Parent is a <whole>lot of work! And after 4 of the little darlings, for me at least, it doesn't get any easier..





    A big "Thank You" toTeachers everywhere!!





    Lisa G.


    <DIV id="yiv1169766072">




    If the school doesn't teach this, then the parents should. Actually the parents should teach the kids from an early age.

    The public schools can only do so much, especially when you consider that half (or more) of class time is spent just trying to keep order.


    [quote]





    <LI>
    <DIV class="ct"><SPAN>87
    New Members</LI>[/list]Visit Your Group


    <DIV id="hd1">Need traffic?


    Drive customers


    With search ads


    on Yahoo!

    <DIV id="hd1">Give Things.


    Get Things.



    It's free and it's


    good for the planet.

    <DIV id="hd1">Special K Group


    on Yahoo! Groups


    Join the challenge


    and lose weight.



    Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. [/url] "] Try it now.[/url]



  5. #5
    Therese Serres
    Guest

    Default Our Kids Financial Future

    our high school has a class that teaches how to manage a checking account, how to budget money.Deal withcredit cards, apply for loans, etc. My son even had to decided what career he wanted, online find the average salary, find an apt in the classifieds, buy a car out of there also. He had to budget his money monthly. They taught how to write a resume, they even had people from the business community come in to do mock interviews so the kids could see what that was all about. The guy interviewing my son even offered him a real job! It was a great class. I just wish my daughter could have gone through a class like that. tT



    On 5/5/08, Nancy[/b] <nancyr@ntin.net> wrote:

    <div bgcolor="#ffffff">
    <font face="Arial" size="2">If the school doesn&#39;t teach this, then the parents should. Actually the parents should teach the kids from an early age.
    <font face="Arial">
    <font face="Arial">The public schools can only do so much, especially when you consider that half (or more) of class time is spent just trying to keep order.
    <font face="Arial">
    <font face="Arial">Nancy
    <font face="Arial">
    <blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid;">
    <div style="FONT: 10pt arial;">----- Original Message -----
    <div style="BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4;FONT: 10pt arial;">From: shawnonline
    <div style="FONT: 10pt arial;"><font size="2">
    <font face="Arial" size="2">I was thinking about something that may be helpful to our children&#39;s future. I wonder why personal finance and budgetingisn&#39;t taught in high school. This would be of great benefit to them and all americans over the long term.
    [/quote]




  6. #6
    Lucy Anderson
    Guest

    Default Our Kids Financial Future

    I think a lot of the training has to come from parents, for this reason. The way a kid will really learn is by having real money and making real decisions with it. Schools are not going to give our kids real money.


    I have one bio son at home and four stepkids. My bio son was raised with me training him about money. We worked up a part-time job / business together, learned to figure out the profits and expenses, how to split them - I required that he save 10%, invest 10%, and tithe 10%. He has a stock market account (Sharebuilder has a great program that does not need hundreds of dollars to start), he has an online Orange Savings account. He is now 14 and is money-savvy. He still makes dumb mistakes, like wanting to buy a laptop on credit. But for the most part, he is smart about saving.


    The other four kids, who have been "told" what to do with money, but who have not had real money in their lives so much, they get money and blow it in the first five minutes. They don&#39;t have a clue....


    Working on them, tho...

    On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 7:18 AM, shawnonline <shawnonline@sbcglobal.net> wrote:








    <font face="Arial" size="2">I was thinking about something that may be helpful to our children&#39;s future. I wonder why personal finance and budgetingisn&#39;t taught in high school. This would be of great benefit to them and all americans over the long term.
    <font face="Arial" size="2">
    <font face="Arial" size="2">I remember I took an engineering economics class in college. I learned more about savings in that class than anything and it was very veryeye opening to me. I didn&#39;t become an engineer (I am a computer programmer), but this was so useful to me.
    <font face="Arial" size="2">
    <font face="Arial" size="2">I think this would help our kids overthe long term. It seems to me that I have learned the most about saving and budgeting from my Grandma&#39;s generation (I&#39;m 33 and she is 86). <font face="Arial" size="2">Also my mother teaching me how to balance a checkbook when I was a teen was great. I didn&#39;t learn much about saving from my parents since they still struggle with it, but have strong tendency to save.
    <font face="Arial" size="2">
    <font face="Arial" size="2">I think our children in general right now are only learning from my generation of getting everything they want and how to pile up debt. Most teenagers have cell phones and spend all of their money from their part time jobs. In high school I saved up $3000 for college myself and that was from only working summers and a paper routeuntil I was 18.
    <font face="Arial" size="2">
    <font face="Arial" size="2">Thanks,
    <font face="Arial" size="2">Shawn


    [/quote]




  7. #7
    Pat Sinclair
    Guest

    Default Our Kids Financial Future

    "our high school has a class that teaches how to manage a checking account,"





    Both my son and daughter had this class and it has done them both a great

    deal of good.They both save money and budget well - even on part time jobs.



    Pat ( Canada)










  8. #8
    shawnonline
    Guest

    Default Our Kids Financial Future

    Yes most of this is from the parents, but I feel my generation (those

    thirtysomething) have an extremely bad understanding of debt/compound

    interest/budgeting so sometimes the teachers have a big effect on students.



    I know that most of my friends in this age group who are now good at these

    things are mostly from their parents teaching them, but there are a few that

    could learn alot through some geeky math teachers who are good at giving

    exciting examples of the power of compound interest.



    Here's an example from bankrate.com that I heard similar to what I learned

    about in my mid 20s that was helpful to me to get started on my 401K right

    away. I was a math major so yes I may have been a geek to begin with, but

    these things were helpful to get me thing.



    "Let's say you save $2,000 every year for 20 years, and your investments

    earn 8 percent annually. If you start at age 25 and contribute until age 45

    and then save nothing further, by age 65 you'd have roughly $426,000. But if

    you wait until age 35 to begin saving $2,000 a year for 20 years and then

    retire at 65, your kitty would amount to about $198,000. In both scenarios

    your out-of-pocket contribution is $40,000. "



    To me these additional examples of compound interest are helpful to give

    example of saving instead of acquiring debt.



    Thanks,

    Shawn








 

 
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •