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  1. #1
    sportsalibi
    Guest

    Default What kind of cuts are you forced to make?

    With gas prices hovering at $3.50 a gallon in our area things are

    getting really bad. I am extremely lucky to be in a profession

    where there is something of a shortage but most people in Michigan

    are not so lucky. Even though I am working, my adult, married kids

    are in financial trouble and I am helping them out as much as

    possible. I don't want to get flamed because I chose to help out my

    adult children and would not go to the extremes I do except they are

    out looking for jobs continously.



    My daughter and her husband both have jobs that have cut back so no

    health insurance is paid. They both work 36 hours a week and

    recently my daughter had an allergic reaction that put her in the

    hospital for 3 days. They both make $9 per hour. They do not drive

    new cars, have computers or internet or cable tv. They are doing ok

    at this point but have no extras when things break or cars need to

    be fixed.



    My son and his wife have a 3 year old. He makes $8 and she was laid

    off. She cannot get unemployment because in Mich you have to work

    18 consective months to qualify and she only worked 17 1/2. They

    cannot get on WIC because their daughter is healthy and she is

    number 478 on the waiting list. The state says they earn too much

    for any other type of assistance. Of course his business also only

    works him 36 hours a week so no health insurance. They need the

    most help. His take home pay is under $230 a week and their very

    basic living expenses for housing is $790. The rest goes for gas

    for him to get to work. I help buy them food and extra gas money.

    Things need to get better in this state because a whole lot of

    people are really hurting!



    Here are some things all of us do to save money...



    Hang all clothes to dry. I hang in the basement and the kids put

    everything on hangers and hang them on the shower rod and in the

    closet leaving the door open. This includes underclothes, pants,

    shirts etc. The only thing any of us dry is towels because they

    tend to get a foul odor.



    My husband and I are the only ones with cable TV and internet

    access. If things get any worse these things will go as well. A

    couple days a week all the family gets together for dinner and to

    watch movies...this allows the other access to the computer to

    search for jobs.



    We got the family plan for phones and each have a phone. We all

    live in different homes but it works for us and costs much less than

    if we all had seperate accounts. No land lines for any of us.



    We shop very carefully and make up pre-packaged meals once a week

    and all take our share home. We drink mostly water or tea, no pop.

    The granddaughter gets 2 glasses of milk a day to grow properly. We

    NEVER eat out. Absolutely no food goes to waste. Peelings from

    vegetables to in the freezer to make stock from. Bones from food go

    in the freezer as well to later make soup.



    I bought seeds on sale at 10/$1 and we will have a family garden...I

    am a gardener but now this will be a family project. No store

    bought seed starting equipment. I made growing pots from newspaper

    and filled with compost from the pile.



    Sunday is trash night and we get the weekly newspaper at that time

    from the neighbor (with his permission). We then read it over the

    next few days. I then shred and use as animal bedding for my

    granddaughter's guinea pig. When the cage is cleaned the litter

    goes in the compost bin.



    Of course, we all drive the minimum to save gas. As soon as it

    stays above 50 degrees my son will take a bike to work as will I.

    He is 6 miles from work and I am 4.



    Anyone else care to share how you have tightened your belts?












  2. #2
    mem68
    Guest

    Default What kind of cuts are you forced to make?

    You and your family are doing great in being frugal and sticking together.

    I have been reading Amy The Frugal Zealot all day and suggest mking

    muffins for breakfast,snacks, and lunch box. Try taking lunches to work from

    the lift overs of meals. Buy in bulk,Cook from scratch.Combine trips to save

    on gas and time.Use the library for books,DVD,movies, magazines,computers.

    Dumpster dive,recycle,reuse,waste nothing,hand me downs, garage sales,

    Goodwill,

    Even tho we think that we are frugal we can still do better. Watch the

    seniors and WIC people shop in the grocery stores how they shop and learn.

    We are using the church and parks more for entertainment.

    ----- Original Message -----

    From: "sportsalibi" <sportsalibi@yahoo.com>

    To: <Budget101_@yahoogroups.com>

    Sent: Friday, March 14, 2008 12:17 PM

    Subject: Budget101.com : What kind of cuts are you forced to make?





    > With gas prices hovering at $3.50 a gallon in our area things are








  3. #3
    Herlean
    Guest

    Default What kind of cuts are you forced to make?

    Well, I have always tried to live with a tightened belt. Currently, hubby is laid off. I make all of our meals, lunches for work, etc. at home. I use the slow cooker a lot. It makes a large amount of food, which I can then serve for a meal or two, freeze the rest and bring it back out in a few days. I am about to fire up the bread machine. A loaf of bread is $2-3 here at our local grocery stores. Those sandwiches for hubby to take to work for lunches add up. Any tips on inexpensive sandwich fillers? Even Peanut Butter is pricey here. We combine trips. We cut cable to the bone, just enough to keep our high speed internet service. I work from home when I can and take the bus when I have to go into the office. That helps with gas. My hubby has been out job hunting since the layoff happened. He has a few
    promising leads. Please pray for his success. Thanks! Laundry goes on the clothesline - esp. his jeans. All sweaters get laid out. Most can't be dried anyhow. We do the towels in the dryer, along with the baby's underclothes. I like his t-shirts to be nice and soft for him. Fill a thermos with hot chocolate or coffee and take it with you when you go out (and when you go to work). Take a water cooler filled with ice water and take a few tumblers out of the cabinet. Keeps you from running into the quickie mart places for a bottle of water when you are out. Spend time on the weekends baking snacks for lunches. My hubby likes chocolate chip cookies and brownies, so I just whip up a batch every few days and send him on his way with a few each lunch. I got chips on sale during the holidays and right after when they were
    marked WAY down. Popped them into the freezer so they don't go rancid. Looked up a few recipes in my Bisquick cookbook yesterday. Will be making a quiche type thing this week. It has ham & eggs in it. I have a piece of ham in the freezer that will fit the bill. Always shop with a grocery list and coupons. Before you buy 3 for $1, ask if the price is just $0.33 for one and get just the one you need. Big batches of homemade soups, chili are great for meals. Make pancakes & eggs for meals. Breakfast, lunch, dinner - all work...and quite inexpensive. Boil a dozen eggs and eat a couple for breakfast or lunch each day. Easy to transport, high in protein, filling and less expensive than hitting the fast food places for them. Take toast to work, or just the bread, if you have access
    to a toaster. Open up your boiled egg, put it on top and breakfast is done. Fill up a set of salt & pepper shakers and leave them in your desk drawer. I fill mine from the bulk size salt & pepper I got at the grocery store months ago. Herlean

    sportsalibi <sportsalibi@yahoo.com> wrote: With gas prices hovering at $3.50 a gallon in our area things are
    getting really bad. I am extremely lucky to be in a profession
    where there is something of a shortage but most people in Michigan
    are not so lucky. Even though I am working, my adult, married kids
    are in financial trouble and I am helping them out as much as
    possible. I don't want to get flamed because I chose to help out my
    adult children and would not go to the extremes I do
    except they are
    out looking for jobs continously.

    My daughter and her husband both have jobs that have cut back so no
    health insurance is paid. They both work 36 hours a week and
    recently my daughter had an allergic reaction that put her in the
    hospital for 3 days. They both make $9 per hour. They do not drive
    new cars, have computers or internet or cable tv. They are doing ok
    at this point but have no extras when things break or cars need to
    be fixed.

    My son and his wife have a 3 year old. He makes $8 and she was laid
    off. She cannot get unemployment because in Mich you have to work
    18 consective months to qualify and she only worked 17 1/2. They
    cannot get on WIC because their daughter is healthy and she is
    number 478 on the waiting list. The state says they earn too much
    for any other type of assistance. Of course his business also only
    works him 36 hours a week so no health insurance. They need the

    most help. His take home pay is under $230 a week and their very
    basic living expenses for housing is $790. The rest goes for gas
    for him to get to work. I help buy them food and extra gas money.
    Things need to get better in this state because a whole lot of
    people are really hurting!

    Here are some things all of us do to save money...

    Hang all clothes to dry. I hang in the basement and the kids put
    everything on hangers and hang them on the shower rod and in the
    closet leaving the door open. This includes underclothes, pants,
    shirts etc. The only thing any of us dry is towels because they
    tend to get a foul odor.

    My husband and I are the only ones with cable TV and internet
    access. If things get any worse these things will go as well. A
    couple days a week all the family gets together for dinner and to
    watch movies...this allows the other access to the computer to
    search for jobs.

    We got the
    family plan for phones and each have a phone. We all
    live in different homes but it works for us and costs much less than
    if we all had seperate accounts. No land lines for any of us.

    We shop very carefully and make up pre-packaged meals once a week
    and all take our share home. We drink mostly water or tea, no pop.
    The granddaughter gets 2 glasses of milk a day to grow properly. We
    NEVER eat out. Absolutely no food goes to waste. Peelings from
    vegetables to in the freezer to make stock from. Bones from food go
    in the freezer as well to later make soup.

    I bought seeds on sale at 10/$1 and we will have a family garden...I
    am a gardener but now this will be a family project. No store
    bought seed starting equipment. I made growing pots from newspaper
    and filled with compost from the pile.

    Sunday is trash night and we get the weekly newspaper at that time
    from the neighbor (with his permission). We then read it
    over the
    next few days. I then shred and use as animal bedding for my
    granddaughter's guinea pig. When the cage is cleaned the litter
    goes in the compost bin.

    Of course, we all drive the minimum to save gas. As soon as it
    stays above 50 degrees my son will take a bike to work as will I.
    He is 6 miles from work and I am 4.

    Anyone else care to share how you have tightened your belts?




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  4. #4
    CeCe Sweet
    Guest

    Default What kind of cuts are you forced to make?

    Herlean,



    I use hummus for a sandwich filler. It's made with

    garbanzo beans but you can actually use other beans to

    make hummus or a bean spread.



    I absolutely love that stuff, and my teenaged son does

    too.



    CeCe



















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  5. #5
    CeCe Sweet
    Guest

    Default What kind of cuts are you forced to make?

    Here are the things Iíve been forced to do because of

    the economy/gas prices.



    Stop at stores only on the way to and from work to

    pick up groceries, etc.



    Because one of the stores I go by on the way home is

    directly in my pathway, I stop there periodically

    during the week looking for marked down produce and

    meat items.



    I expanded my square foot garden 4 times larger than

    it was last year and I started a compost pile.



    I also purchased additional seeds at 10 cents to 30

    cents a package and purchased herb seeds.



    I purchased herb and natural healing books in order to

    use food and herbs to deal with my physical conditions

    in a further attempt to get me off of certain

    supplements.



    I have two problems that probably most people on this

    list donít have to deal with.



    First, I have food allergies and sensitivities. I

    cannot eat anything that has gluten, dairy, eggs,

    beef, pork, and most seafood. I cannot eat oranges or

    corn. I also have problems at times with peanuts. I

    can eat poultry, fish (non-scavenging) and wild game

    (if I could ever find some stuff). I can eat lamb,

    goat, sheep, providing those have not been treated

    with hormones. I am allergic to food additives and

    cannot eat anything that has high fructose corn syrup,

    hydrogenated vegetable oil, monosodium glutamate, and

    any artificial food colorings and flavorings. So life

    is a challenge to say the least.



    Second, my youngest son who lives with me is autistic.

    (heís 17). He is a typical teenager in that he eats,

    but he requires other necessities that I have to pay

    money for Ė such as keeping him in Special Olympics

    (because he has dyspraxia Ė a muscle disorder) so that

    he is active and learns relationship skills. I also

    have to send him to camps and other specialized

    training that is not covered by any government

    programs (I make too much money), but yet are required

    for him to advance and become a more responsible

    person and hopefully gainfully employed one day.



    So, I have different priorities than most people out

    here. My son is a big and talk man at 6 ft 5 and

    wears a 16 shoe, so thatís hard to deal with too.



    So, I try to make things less expensive for me at home

    by doing things that I have always done such as shop

    at the dollar day at the thrift store, hit garage

    sales when I can (when I am out and about) and buying

    clothing / shoes, or anything else that I can when

    prices are 80 percent off or more. I unfortunately

    cannot do the same for him as I have to buy his shoes

    online and he requires special shoes because he has

    flat feet.



    Living in North Georgia, we also have to deal with a

    drought. Fortunately vegetable gardens are exempt,

    but we were asked to cut our water usage by 10 percent

    last year (which we did).



    I could probably think of more but you get the

    picture.

    Cece





















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  6. #6
    Donna Shad
    Guest

    Default What kind of cuts are you forced to make?

    We are failry fortunate that we haven't had to do alot

    of tighting but I am starting a garden this year. Had

    to buy a cultivator though (cheaper than renting it

    and I needed to have for several projects). I did buy

    seeds and a starter kit (it works out for me because I

    don't have luck with pots and plants. I sorta have a

    black thumb sometimes). I removed soda from our house.

    I go to whole sale clubs to buy stuff we really use. I

    order my medications via the internet (from our

    insurance company) and get a month's free for doing

    it. I order the printer ink cartridges on line so I

    pay 1/2 or less of what the store charges.

    I walk my dogs and use the exercise equipment I bought

    a long time ago instead of joining a gym.

    We bought our son an enexpensive car to drive back and

    forth to school so I am not makeing 4 trips a day and

    his car has much better gas milage than mine does.

    We go to the library to rent cd's instead of buying

    them. We use on-demand (I have a really good bundle

    deal for my area on phone, internet and cable) to

    watch movies (not the pay ones the free ones). When we

    go out for dinner it is usually when I have been sick

    or running two or three of us to the dr that day.

    We do have a land line but that is for overseas calls.

    We have cell phones that are all conected together. I

    use a family plan to include my mother to call. My son

    has his girlfriend on his.

    Our biggest bill (besides mortgage) is food. It is

    very expensive here where I live. It wouldn't take

    much to spend 300 per week on groceries (some has to

    do with health issues but for the most part it's

    expensive). I do go to Save-a-lot for my canned goods

    and I get my meat at Sams when possible. The rest I

    have to use area chain stores. I stay away from

    Walmart (can't go in without dropping 80-100 no matter

    what I do).

    We also only go out for dinner on tuesday, wednesday

    or thursday. (makes it more enjoyable for us.

    That's all I can think of for now

    Take care

    Donna









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  7. #7
    Carole Durand
    Guest

    Default What kind of cuts are you forced to make?

    Hey, how do you make growing pots out of newspaper? That sounds just

    wonderful! You wouldn't even have to take the seedlings out of the

    pot to replant them! I usually save the plastic ones, and use those

    whenever I have a need, but these would be better (and I confess I am

    low on pots!)



    I save money by using acetone to extend my gas (I'm getting 32 mpg,

    and my average is 26 - 28 mpg), and although I can't use public

    transport or walk, I combine my trips, and I Google maps and revise

    routes until I find the most fuel-efficient, cost-effective routes.

    I keep my tires inflated, my oil and my filters clean (I switched to

    Amsoil, and now just change my oil once per year). I try not to

    drive like a maniac, and I coast as soon as I see the future need to

    stop looming ahead on the road. Once you start doing this, you can't

    help but get a kick out of all the drivers who race up to a stop

    light! You have to chuckle, because you know that you used to be one

    of them! Every time you brake, you are wasting gas; it's just as bad

    as going excessive speeds, or driving in first gear continually.

    Listen to your car, and it will teach you how to make it work less.

    If you don't want to "listen" to your car, just set the cruise

    control, LOL. That's a great fail-safe.



    during the work week, I only drink coffee from work, LOL. I list it

    as a benefit of employment. I also keep bread, jelly and peanut

    butter in the fridge at work, in case I forget to bring in

    leftovers. That way, I'm not forced to go to the grocery store and

    shop for food during lunch hour, when I'm already hungry.



    I also use as few toxic household chemicals as possible, and this

    saves money on the cost of cleaning supplies and healthcare (no, I'm

    not kidding - I estimate that I've stayed out of the Dr.'s office at

    least twice as a result already this year - the chemicals had made me

    very ill).



    Other ways that I cut costs are by putting sheet plastic over

    whatever might leak (usually windows and drafty, little-used doors).

    I block off unused rooms and put a rug at the bottom of the door so

    I'm not heating them through drafts. I have my appliances on power

    strips that I'd had around, and these power strips are only plugged

    into the wall when the appliance is in use. This applies to the

    microwave, too - what the heck! I'm going to put a timer on the

    water heater, too, so it's only working while I'm at home and could

    use it. I have a few extra timers, and might experiment with this.

    These are the timers that you use to time your christmas lights.

    Please let me know if you've done this, and the results that you got

    for doing it! My energy company has a program in place where, during

    the summer months, they might elect to automatically cycle my central

    air system off to save energy. My understanding is that it will save

    me considerably. They also purport that most people don't even

    notice when the cycling is taking place. With that in mind, I'm

    signing up!



    My thermostat is set low in the winter and high in the summer, and my

    lightbulbs are almost entirely CFLs. There is a common misconception

    that the mercury used in CFLs makes them prohibitively bad for the

    environment. CFLs actually have less mercury in them than a standard

    incandescent lightbulb, though. Phillips makes a regular fluorescent

    that is incredibly low in mercury, because they have refined the

    placement needs of this element. The next bulb just gaining

    popularity in the general market is the LED. It is popular, now, in

    Christmas lights, because it pays for itself in one season. LEDs, as

    regular household lighting, are expensive and somewhat impractical if

    not used for task lighting and small areas, but there will be enough

    improvements over the next few years that they should be an

    incredible buy if you choose to go that path. They last far longer

    than even the CFLs, and their cost to run could be covered by your

    child's allowance, if you are a kind parent (unlike myself) and do

    that type of thing, LOL. The CFLs that I prefer are actually the

    cheapest that I've found - the Home Depot store brand. CFLs are

    meant to be kept on, not switched on and off all the time. If you

    have problems with them burning out much before their incredible

    60,000 hour pledge, this may be the cause. I haven't had a problem

    yet, though, and I don't treat these lights any differently than the

    incandescents that they had replaced. To give you an idea of the

    comparrison between incandescents, CFLs and LEDs, the first is

    roughly a buck a bulb, lasts 1000 hours and uses 60 watts. The

    second costs $3 at Home Depot, lasts 10,000 hours and uses around 15-

    22 watts. the third, if you get one will sufficient LEDs (go for

    over 50), costs $45, lasts 60,000+ hours and uses - - - 2 to 5

    watts. LOL, it's incredible. Until LEDs improve, I'll probably wait

    until my CFLs burn out. By that time, I'll be ready to test the

    waters (uless I find a good task lighting need). In the long run,

    CFLs cost less than incandescents, and LEDs cost less than CFLs.

    Comparing LEDs isn't an apples-to-apples experience, though, and you

    will be hard-pressed to find one on a store shelf. Add Shipping and

    hadling to your budget if you'd like to venture in that direction,

    LOL.



    More savings: everyone in my house knows to not send clothes to the

    laundry room unless they are DIRTY, because they will be making a

    second trip to correct their "mistake." Getting the kids active in

    doing the laundry greatly reduces these "mistakes," by the way! Once

    the truly dirty clothes arrive, I wash them in cold water (heating

    the water is the largest part of your laundry appliance bill), with a

    T of washing soda, and a T of borax. If they are really,

    impressively dirty, I might exert myself and do more for them, LOL.

    I only wash full loads, and when I use the dryer, I use those static

    balls and maybe a half of a softener sheet. I set the dryer for as

    short of time as possible. I have no static problems. Of course,

    because I like to line dry often enough (I think I've heard you'll

    save roughly a buck per load), I wouldn't most of the time, anyway.

    My towels are more absorbent now that I'm too broke, um, cheap, to

    use liquid fabric softener. My clothes are every bit as clean as

    before I got cheap with the laundry, by the way. In fact, they might

    be cleaner, because I think the borax has mildew-inhibiting

    properties. I've left laundry in the washing machine of shamefully

    long periods of time, rerunning the load and forgetting again. I'm

    busy; that's my story, LOL. But when I've come back to my forsaken

    loads, they have always smelled fresh. This, I know, is NOT the

    normal experience. How aweosme is that?!



    I rarely use paper towels. If I need something disposable, I usually

    think about whether I have an available worn-out rag, first. It all

    depends upon which seems more cost-effective.



    I have NO cable, and I do my internet at work or a friend's house.

    This saves me $50/month + tax, and loads of LIFE. My family life is

    far richer because we aren't distracted from living it, any longer.



    We always eat meals together, and almost always eat them at home. If

    we must eat out, I give the kids so little from the menu (think drive-

    thru dollar menu - no kids meals, no play place, no fun) that it

    seems there is no reward for them to request that we go out. LOL, I

    don't care if that sounds cruel, because putting that stuff into your

    body constitutes cruelty, anyway.



    I don't use car washes, convenience services or anything that costs

    money to save time and effort, unless there is a very good reason. I

    get my friends on board with my attitude, so I have accountability,

    and we can inspire each other to do well and make a difference.



    I have a place for every penny I save. It's always marked "BILL."

    The translation for this naughty-sounding four letter word

    is "gleaning out a great tomorrow."



    I reuse, reduce and recycle, as much as I think I can. I'm always

    open for new ideas on this! If anything looks remotely useable, I

    throw it in my "useful" box. Then when I have a need, and don't know

    what to do to meet it, I go down to my "useful" box, pull out a few

    items and fashion up a solution. It's so cool! But I have to be

    careful not to oversave. All things in moderation. Craig's list and

    freecycle are where I go, first, when I need to get or unload

    something.



    As a result of my R/R/R philosophy, I reduced my trash can size with

    the sanitation company. I'm only saving $24 per year, but I'm still

    saving it, and it all adds up; I'm probably more pleased with the

    fact that the landfill is fed less on my account.



    I like the idea of frugality, because it makes me feel like I'm doing

    my part to preserve what God has given us, both in natural an

    economic resources. And, well, I feel like I'm sticking it to the

    man, LOL. I'm a work in progress













    I bought seeds on sale at 10/$1 and we will have a family garden...I

    am a gardener but now this will be a family project. No store

    bought seed starting equipment. I made growing pots from newspaper

    and filled with compost from the pile.








  8. #8
    Donna Shad
    Guest

    Default What kind of cuts are you forced to make?

    Cece,

    I hope the rains/tornadoes that just went through Ga helps out

    with the water shortage. I live in SC and we are doing alright.

    Still not suppose to waste water but you know how it is.



    I also turn off all computers at night. Along with Printers,

    speakers, cable boxes, anything that is not absoultly necessary

    for us to be on.



    We do have a outlet store here for Goodies that sells clothing

    very inexpensively. We bought 5 t-shirts for my oldest for

    somthing like 20 bucks. Not bad. My husband has bought a pair of

    pants for like 8.00 (down the road the same pair was 40).



    I can feel for you on the shoes. I had to have orthopedic shoes

    that were around 300 per pair. I bought them and did my dangdest

    to solve the foot problem that caused me to have to wear it. My

    problem is the opposite of your sons. I have high arches.



    I know about allergies to. I can't have Sulfa at all or soy.

    allergy test says I'm allergic to everything except ciggeretts

    and soda. So I kind of figure out what is the worst and stay

    away from those thing with the exception of special occations.

    But Sulfa and Soy will cause a trip to the hospital. (sulfa is

    in wine and some additives).



    My husband has to have a special diet since he is diabetic and

    the supplies are outrageous and now I get to test as well for I

    am working my way toward being a diabetic (syndrome X). So that

    is one thing we can't save to much on (I do buy in bulk and I

    also buy the store brands).



    Some of the meds are high cost that can't be helped. Fortunatly

    I have only one pill that is high and my asthma med is also high

    but I am down to one or two asthma attacks a month. My husband

    has a high med also. We spend about 175 per month on meds.

    That's not including the costs of supplies.



    We have a son that is in a state college with tuition prices of

    a private college. We make to much for him to get grant's. His

    grades are good enough for scholarships so we pay his tuition.

    Our youngest has hearing issues that requires him to have a

    hearing aid that I found out after purchasing it that it was not

    covered under our insurance so that was a 2200 expense we didn't

    expect. He will start college next fall. So there goes even more

    money.



    Now you all know why I need to save as much as possible.



    I did change my insurance and cut that in half but unfortunatly

    the oldest son got three tickets in a row and there went that

    savings. When he graduates though he is on his own. For now he

    pays his own gas and lunch. He is also responsible for the

    upkeep of the truck he drives (my truck he gets it when he gets

    out of school).



    I do go online and buy his text books. I can get them alot

    cheaper than at his schools bookstore. He goes and gets the ISBN

    number and I have him write down the addition and all that

    pertinate info including the cost of new and used. Most times

    atleast I will save 50% off the used price for a new book.



    I send all my side of the familys birthday cards to my mom at

    one time and she gives them out on the appropriate days. (It is

    usually at christmas time when I send a package with gifts.)

    Lets face it most kids don't mind money, neither do most adults.

    My sister-in-law like Tinkerbell so I usualy wrap a second

    package with happy birthday paper and send her something with

    Tinkerbell on it.



    I will shop for a bargain till my husband tells me just to get

    it. Then I will get the best price still.



    Instead of buying the pam spray cans I bought a spray can at bed

    bath and beyond for 10.00 that lets me put 2 oz of oil in it and

    pump it up to spray my pans with it. Works great for me and I

    don't use so much oil.



    I usually fix things myself/husband. We don't hire out to much

    stuff. Cut my own grass. Trim my own hedge rows. Do my own pool

    maintenance. We are even rebuilding our garage ourself. We even

    work on our own cars and change the oil ourself.



    We roll change and put it in a special account. I also charge us

    for laundry as if I went to a laundry matt but I have the

    convience of home. (This money goes with the change) This

    account will be mine and my husbands dream trip when we figure

    out what it will be.



    I'll see what else I can think of that I do to save money.

    Donna



    --- CeCe Sweet <CeCeSweet@yahoo.com> wrote:



    > Here are the things Iíve been forced to do because of

    > the economy/gas prices.

    >

    > Stop at stores only on the way to and from work to

    > pick up groceries, etc.

    >

    > Because one of the stores I go by on the way home is

    > directly in my pathway, I stop there periodically

    > during the week looking for marked down produce and

    > meat items.

    >

    > I expanded my square foot garden 4 times larger than

    > it was last year and I started a compost pile.

    >

    > I also purchased additional seeds at 10 cents to 30

    > cents a package and purchased herb seeds.

    >

    > I purchased herb and natural healing books in order to

    > use food and herbs to deal with my physical conditions

    > in a further attempt to get me off of certain

    > supplements.

    >

    > I have two problems that probably most people on this

    > list donít have to deal with.

    >

    > First, I have food allergies and sensitivities. I

    > cannot eat anything that has gluten, dairy, eggs,

    > beef, pork, and most seafood. I cannot eat oranges or

    > corn. I also have problems at times with peanuts. I

    > can eat poultry, fish (non-scavenging) and wild game

    > (if I could ever find some stuff). I can eat lamb,

    > goat, sheep, providing those have not been treated

    > with hormones. I am allergic to food additives and

    > cannot eat anything that has high fructose corn syrup,

    > hydrogenated vegetable oil, monosodium glutamate, and

    > any artificial food colorings and flavorings. So life

    > is a challenge to say the least.

    >

    > Second, my youngest son who lives with me is autistic.

    > (heís 17). He is a typical teenager in that he eats,

    > but he requires other necessities that I have to pay

    > money for Ė such as keeping him in Special Olympics

    > (because he has dyspraxia Ė a muscle disorder) so that

    > he is active and learns relationship skills. I also

    > have to send him to camps and other specialized

    > training that is not covered by any government

    > programs (I make too much money), but yet are required

    > for him to advance and become a more responsible

    > person and hopefully gainfully employed one day.

    >

    > So, I have different priorities than most people out

    > here. My son is a big and talk man at 6 ft 5 and

    > wears a 16 shoe, so thatís hard to deal with too.

    >

    > So, I try to make things less expensive for me at home

    > by doing things that I have always done such as shop

    > at the dollar day at the thrift store, hit garage

    > sales when I can (when I am out and about) and buying

    > clothing / shoes, or anything else that I can when

    > prices are 80 percent off or more. I unfortunately

    > cannot do the same for him as I have to buy his shoes

    > online and he requires special shoes because he has

    > flat feet.

    >

    > Living in North Georgia, we also have to deal with a

    > drought. Fortunately vegetable gardens are exempt,

    > but we were asked to cut our water usage by 10 percent

    > last year (which we did).

    >

    > I could probably think of more but you get the

    > picture.

    > Cece

    >

    >

    >

    >

    >

    >

    >

    >

    >

    >

    >

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