Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Budget101 Guru
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    246
    Blog Entries
    1
    Downloads
    10
    Uploads
    0

    Default On My Tomato Plant

    This is what I woke up to on my Tomato Plant
    Name:  Photo-0007.jpg
Views: 196
Size:  88.2 KB
    and it ate a Tomato..What do I do?...and is that gonna turn into a Moth or Butterfly?
    Name:  Photo-0003.jpg
Views: 187
Size:  89.0 KB


    I don't wanna Kill it

  2. #2
    Deal GURU
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2,521
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: On My Tomato Plant

    It is a tomato hornworm. They turn into moths that are a mottled grey-brown with yellow spots. In the worm stage they will eat your tomato plants and sometimes the tomato itself, they also like eggplant plants, pepper plants and potato plants (I am sure there are other plants as well, but their favorite is the tomato). You do not want them in your garden! Where there is one you most likely will find more. The best thing to do is kill it (them)-- just pick it off and put it in soapy water, or smash it. I know it is hard to kill some things but if you want your tomatoes it is necessary. Hope this helps. Happy Gardening! Thanks; Virginia

  3. #3
    Creator & Designer of Budget101.com
    Join Date
    Jan 1995
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    3,407
    Blog Entries
    191
    Downloads
    51
    Uploads
    245

    Default Re: On My Tomato Plant

    It's a Very (TOO) Healthy Tomato Horn Worm, as virginia said, you Definitely want to find him and his 20 friends immediately. They will decimate your plants Literally overnight!! Where there is one, there are many. DE powder works great to get rid of them without chemicals.

    It grows into a "sphinx", "hawk", or "hummingbird" moth (depends on who you ask!)- and this is what they look like as Moths:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	HWadL.jpg 
Views:	219 
Size:	97.8 KB 
ID:	5135

    Photo Credit:
    VegEdge: Vegetable IPM Resource for the Midwest
    ~Liss~
    Creator & Designer of
    www.Budget101.com
    www.GroceryBudget101.com
    Budget101 Forums
    KitchenMixGifts.Budget101.com

    *Newbies*
    Forum How To Guide

    **The happiest people are not those with the best or the most of everything, The happiest people know how to make the best of everything they have.**

  4. #4
    Budget101 Guru
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    246
    Blog Entries
    1
    Downloads
    10
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: On My Tomato Plant

    My Oldest son went out there and Picked the two off he saw...One was laying down already dead in the pot..Looked like a bird got Him...My Son killed the other one..I'll keep a look out for more..Thanks For The help

  5. #5
    Freebies Make My Day
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Columbia Heights, MN.
    Posts
    6,019
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: On My Tomato Plant

    I have seen a few of my tomatoes with the same kind of bite mark in them, I was not sure what kind of critter was eating them. I will have to look closer for some of these types of worms.
    Hope Everyone Is Enjoying The Day. Best Wishes From MN ~ Pamela

  6. #6
    Smart Budgeter
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Camden, MI
    Posts
    85
    Blog Entries
    3
    Downloads
    1
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: On My Tomato Plant

    Tomato worms are the bane of anyone growing tomatoes.

    To control the tomato worms naturally there are things you can do to attract the Braconid wasp. They feed on bugs we generally hate to see in our gardens.

    If you ever see a tomato worm covered with what looks like white egg sacks, leave that one alone. It is carrying braconid wasps that are in their final metamorphosis. That worm is already doomed and so are most of the other tomato worms in the area.

    The adult wasps feed on nectar. Any flowering plant will do. I usually plant dill, fennel, parsley, stevia, basil, and thyme in with my tomatoes. These are enough to attract this wasp as well as several other kinds of beneficial insects.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •