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  1. #1
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    Default Home appliances, phones, cars, all have planned obsolescence

    Here's a familiar scenario: the washer or television breaks down, so an individual calls the manufacturer for a spare part. However, they are informed the part isn't made anymore, so they'll have to just buy a new one. That's called planned obsolescence and it is included in just about any product one can name.


    An enormous issue in every division


    Manufacturers, for a long time, have been building a feature into their products solely for their benefit called “planned obsolescence.” In other words, an item is made with the knowledge and intention of it being obsolete within a few years.



    It is true that CDs are better than cassettes and the iPod is even better than that. It is also true that it is better to have a flat-screen TV than a tube set. This is part of the argument; technology is changing so rapidly that the product needs to be swapped out often.



    However, it's mostly a load of dingo's kidneys. The idea is to get people to throw the old one away and just buy a new one, thereby putting more cash in corporate pockets.



    As soon as warranty is over, every little thing breaks



    There was one story of a male who bought an LG washer and dryer set seven years back for $2,000. They broke as soon as the warranty was over, of course, and then he could not get a part to fix them. The customer service representative told him that the devices were not meant to last anyway when he known as.



    There should be no issue with something you pay $1,000 for.



    This has been taking place since the 1960s, according to Consumer Reports in 2008. It told of how appliance makers started shortening warranties even then, and there were many complaints from customers.



    Empirical studies aren't exactly rife concerning planned obsolescence, but a plethora of blogs and op-eds will swear to how quickly things wear out and the way much harder it is to fix them than replace them. Anecdotes definitely can't be taken as gospel as people tend to whine and wheedle about things, but as a post on the Houston Chronicle points out, Americans spend an estimated $15 billion on appliances annually; durability, therefore, becomes the enemy.



    Bypass it



    The old thing becomes undesirable in two different ways, according to Wikipedia. The product will either come out in a new style or color that is trendier for the moment, or it will come out with a brand new function that individuals just have to get.



    There will always be new things coming out. New automobiles, new TVs, and brand new iPods will keep appearing. Just make sure you get the very best deal possible, and that is the very best way to stay away from getting ripped off.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Home appliances, phones, cars, all have planned obsolescence

    Having your planned obsolescence with your appliances is great to have. Here's a familiar scenario: the washer or television breaks down, so an individual calls the producer for a spare part. However, they are informed the part isn't really made anymore, so they'll have to just purchase a new one. That's called planned obsolescence and it is included in just about any product one can name

 

 

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