Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1

    Default Top 10 Budget Drains, a Yahoo Article

    Here's a list of the top 10 drains on your budget. Maybe it'll help

    some of you out, on identifying where you can trim your budget a



    It's easy to fritter away money on daily expenses. If you fall into

    these money traps, learn to avoid them and pocket the savings.

    1. Coffee 6. Car washes

    2. Cigarettes 7. Weekday lunches out

    3. Alcohol 8. Vending machines snacks

    4. Bottled water 9. Interest charges on credit cards

    5. Manicures 10. Unused memberships

    1. Coffee -- According to the National Coffee Association, the

    average price for brewed coffee is $1.38. There are roughly 260

    weekdays per year, so buying one coffee every weekday morning costs

    almost $360 per year.

    2. Cigarettes -- The Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids reports that the

    average price for a pack of cigarettes in the United States is

    $4.54. Pack-a-day smokers fork out $1,660 a year. Weekend smoker?

    Buying a pack once a week adds up, too: $236.

    3. Alcohol -- Drink prices vary based on the location. But assuming

    an average of $5 per beer including tip, buying two beers per day

    adds up to $3,650 per year. Figure twice that for two mixed drinks a

    day at the local bar. That's not chump change.

    4. Bottled water from convenience stores -- A 20-ounce bottle of

    Aquafina bottled water costs about $1. One bottle of water per day

    costs $365 per year. It costs the environment plenty, too.

    5. Manicures -- The Day Spa Magazine Price Survey of 2004 found that

    the average cost of a manicure is $20.53. A weekly manicure sets you

    back about $1,068 per year.

    6. Car washes -- The average cost for a basic auto detailing package

    is $58, according to The tab for getting your car

    detailed every two months: $348 per year.

    7. Weekday lunches out -- $9 will generally cover a decent lunch

    most work days. If you buy rather than pack a lunch five days a week

    for one year, you shell out about $2,350 a year.

    8. Vending machines snacks -- The average vending machine snack

    costs $1. Buy a pack of cookies every afternoon at work and pay $260

    per year.

    9. Interest charges on credit card bills -- According to a survey

    released at the end of May 2007, the median amount of credit card

    debt carried by Americans is $6,600. Rate tables on

    indicate that fixed interest rates on a standard card average 13.44

    percent. Making the minimum payment each month, it will take 250

    months (almost 21 years) to pay off the debt and cost $4,868 in

    interest. Ouch!

    10. Unused memberships -- reports that the monthly

    service fee at gyms averages between $35 and $40. At $40 per month,

    an unused gym membership runs $480 per year.

    Copyrighted, All rights reserved.

  2. #2

    Default Top 10 Budget Drains, a Yahoo Article

    My husband packs his lunch at night when the kids pack theirs for

    school in the morning.

    We also buy him things like pretzals, cereal bars (the nutrigrain

    kind), and a few other snacks he keeps locked up in his office. That

    way, he doesn't hit a vending machine for a snack when he gets

    munchy at work.

    His work provides free drinks- soda, flavored water, orange juice,

    milk, coffee, espresso, etc, so that's a savings we have, too. On

    the days he forgets to pack a lunch, he'll spend $2 on 3 tacos at

    Taco Bell, bring it back to work, grab a free drink, and eat in.

    --- In, Peggy <queenpeggy29@...> wrote:


    > I used to buy a lot of bottled water, in the case when it is on

    sale, and individual bottles when I needed one in a pinch.


    > Then I started reading about the effect on the

    environment.......billions of bottles going into landfills and it

    takes 1,000 years to break down plastic......and not to mention the

    chemicals that leach out as it breaks down.


    > And then I learned that bottled water is nothing's just tap water. And why does ANYONE spend $1.39 to

    $1.79 for a bottle of tap water???????????????? Or why would I

    spend ANY amount - even the cost of buying it on sale by the

    case? Convenience????


    > Convenience (to me) is equal to laziness.


    > I had several bottles on hand, and I have an insulated lunch

    bag. Every night I wash out my bottles, fill them about half-way

    with plain old water, and put them in the freezer overnight. In the

    morning, I fill them the rest of the way with water, put them in my

    bag and take them with me.


    > This is a very simple thing for me to do -- I am already

    packing my lunch every night, so it just takes about a minute more

    to fill & freeze my water bottles. I'm helping the environment,

    helping myself, because having the water handy means I"ll actually

    drink the water), and I'm helping my wallet as well! (If you buy

    only ONE bottle of water a WEEK, it adds up to $72 to $93 a year.)


    > I also stopped drinking soda for pretty much the same reasons.

    I was able to find canned soda by the case for $3.99, which comes to

    about 17 cents a can opposed to 75 cents a can from the vending

    machine at work. This was that I was reading about how bad soda is

    for you, so I stopped drinking it, regular and diet as well!


    > I am no health-nut, but I am prudent and I realize I don't need

    soda every day.. So I only drink one now occasionally....


    > I mentioned I am packing my lunch every night. It only takes a

    few minutes. At first I had trouble disciplining myself to do it,

    but now I do it as I clean up the kitchen after dinner, and it has

    become routine I pack a couple of snacks a day, too. I have been

    doing this diligently now for three months, and I can see the


Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

(C) Melissa 'Liss' Burnell & 1995-2016
Material from may not be copied or distributed, or republished, uploaded, posted, or transmitted in any way, without the prior written consent of, EXCEPT: you may print recipe pages for your personal, non-commercial home use only, provided you do not delete or change any copyright, trademark, or other proprietary notices. Modification or use of the materials for any other purpose violates's intellectual property rights.