budget for $32K a year?- Budget101 Discussion List

I feel dumb asking because I know people live on much less, but we have a 3 year old and a 1 year old and are struggling...I cut every corner I can, but we are still really struggling. Any advice or comments would be greatly appreciated.

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  1. #1
    crazigyrl_jen
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    I feel dumb asking because I know people live on much less, but we

    have a 3 year old and a 1 year old and are struggling...I cut every

    corner I can, but we are still really struggling. Any advice or

    comments would be greatly appreciated.



    Jennifer








  2. #2
    Vickie
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    Try selling outgrown clothing & any other unwanted items at online auction sites such as....Bidville.com, Autionquests.com, Blujay.com, Garagesaleforever.com & Ebay. None charge a listing fee except Ebay.

    crazigyrl_jen <jen@kittell.net> wrote: I feel dumb asking because I know people live on much less, but we
    have a 3 year old and a 1 year old and are struggling...I cut every
    corner I can, but we are still really struggling. Any advice or
    comments would be greatly
    appreciated.

    Jennifer




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    Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.


  3. #3
    herberkids3
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    Well, for starters, it depends on the area you live in. I mean, someone

    making 32k a year can be considered really poor, or mid level middle

    class. If you live in an area where most people live in nice houses and

    drive expensive cars, and a typical grocery visit costs half a

    paycheck, then it's harder to do.



    Our family consists of an 11 yo, 8 yo, and 5yo, plus my husband and I-

    so 5 people. I'm a SAHM, and my husband just got a new job that pays

    35k a year, salary (meaning no over time). We had to relocate for the

    job, but not far.



    So far, the area we are in is cheaper in everything but our rent. We

    splurged BIG time on the apartment we went with. It has 4 bedrooms,

    though, plus ammenities such as a pool, tennis courts, basketball

    court, playground, a gym, and washer/dryer hook up's right in our

    apartment. The overall size of the apartment is just over 1500 square

    foot, so it's huge for an apartment. Additionally, it's about 400-500

    sq ft bigger than the house we previously rented. That said, the rent

    is $1015 a month (ouch- to me!), where as the house we rented was

    $775/mo. But, it includes the cost of gas (heat), which in the winter

    was running us $150-250 a month in the house, so that eats up some of

    the cost.





    Anyway, for our family, I do all the budgeting. It's not perfect, we're

    broke sometimes, but we're also at a point where we're actually making

    enough to NOT live paycheck to paycheck.



    Here's some idea's on corners to cut:



    Grocery- buy generics, and don't buy a bunch of extra stuff. If a brand

    name is on sale cheaper than generic, get that. What ever price is

    lowest, get it. Start including more side dishes with meals, and cut

    back on the cost & quantity of the overall main dish to cut cost. Use

    coupons. Shop loss leaders, fresh produce stands, and make meals from

    scratch.



    Utility bills- Unplug items not in use to conserve electricity: clocks,

    VCR's, radios- basically anything with so much as a light up display,

    because it is using electricity when not in use. Lower the wattage in

    many bulbs by 1 level, or get the spiral bulbs that use less wattage

    for the same amount of brightness. In the winter, lower the thermostat

    by 1 degree or 2 degrees, and wear warmer clothing. In the summer,

    raise it a degree or 2 and wear cooler clothing. Keep the curtains shut

    to avoid the sun heating the house up. On cooler days, open windows,

    and prop fans in them to keep the air off. Fill the freezer with water

    filled milk jugs so it uses less energy to keep items cool.



    Phone- Commit to 1 type, land line or cell phone. You don't need both.

    If you like the conveince of a cell, ditch the land line and save

    yourselve $20-100 a month.



    TV- Cut back on the cable plan you have, if you have one. Or on the

    satilight if you have that. Do you use all those channels? Call and see

    what smaller packages are offered, or make it sound like you plan to

    switch- they may offer you a better deal on what you currently have.



    Internet- If you don't spend all your time online, and currently pay

    $20 or more a month for DSL or cable internet, then cut the cost by

    going back to dial-up. You can get dialup for as low as $5 a month at

    some places. Your phone company, if you still have or plan to keep a

    landline, might have a special deal on it.



    Extra's, Entertainment, etc- Cut, cut, cut. Before renting a movie,

    before stopping off for burgers for dinner, before grabbing hair gel,

    pay the bills and get the groceries. From what is left after all that

    is done, make 2 piles: Allowance, Savings. put half the money left into

    a savings account, and half you can use as allowance. The allowance is

    for those little extra's that don't seem like much, but that add up-

    quickly!



    The savings account should be seperate from any accounts you have no.

    Put it into a bank you don't usually use, and decline the atm card.

    Make the money inaccessible, basically.



    I started an account like that back in February to save for vacation.

    Any extra money we get, plus some extra from our tax refunds, and we

    currently have over $1500 in it. I do a lot of stuff online, including

    a paid to do stuff site, a survey site, and a site that pays me to

    write articles. Any checks I get in the mail are deposited into that

    account. The lower amount checks are held onto until I have a few, then

    they are put into that account. I also save change and once my jar (an

    old spaghetti sauce jar) is full, I deposit it. Some of my change

    deposites have been close to $100 in and of themselves.



    The savings gives you a cushion, even if it's only $100. It can save

    you when you have car repairs, or when you need to get diapers, or

    there aren't enough groceries in the cupboards. Making it less

    accessible means you can't go on a Saturday night and draw money out to

    go see a movie. Or to grab enough out to get a lamp you like.



    The allowance money should be used for anything you don't -need-, but

    want: movie rentals, nights out, a new shirt, going through a drive-

    through, etc. It will make you think twice when you know on Monday, "I

    have $20 to get through to next Monday... do I really want to spend $5

    of that now on a cheeseburger meal??"



    More on entertainment: Find cheap or free entertainment such as

    spending the afternoon at the park with a frisbee from the dollar

    store, going to the beach for the day, watching an older movie on TV

    with a bowl of popcorn, reading a book from the library, etc.



    Another way to bring income in- have a yard sale. If you can make $100,

    it's still $100 you didn't have before, and you can stock up on

    groceries with it, to lessen the week to week burden. We stock up on

    things we eat alot when they are on sale, to avoid paying larger prices.



    My budgeting ways didn't come from a frugal up bringing. Now, my

    parents were not big spenders, they scrimped and saved every penny over

    the years. But I never had anything to do with it, so it wasn't

    something I really knew how to do.



    When I got married, my husband was a full time college student, working

    part time on campus, and full time summers on campus. Our first year

    married, he literally made just over $7,000. I was a stay at home mom

    right away due in part to high day care costs, and in part due to not

    knowing the area well. We supplemented our income by having him take

    out as much as he could when the school loans came around, so twice a

    year, we got boosts of around $2,000-3,000, and at tax time, we got an

    additional $4,000 back. So, while we DID only make $7k a year, we were

    bringing in up to $17,000 a year. Still, we lived -very- frugally. I

    remember one day we got into a fight (one of few, and likely our first

    one), and I walked around town for the day. It was near dinner time,

    and I was mad enough to spend the $5 in my pocket on a meal at KFC.



    I felt SO guilty about that, because I knew we had $15 total to last

    till our next paycheck, which was a week away yet, leaving us with just

    $10 after that meal. We never ordered out, we only rented cheap movies

    (new releases were a very special occasion), and we scrimped and saved

    when we could to do special things.



    We splurged when our big checks came in from taxes, & student loans,

    but even then, not much.





    Good luck! If you want to know more about any of my frugal ways, just

    ask or email me. I'd be happy to help a bit more.







    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "crazigyrl_jen" <jen@...> wrote:

    >

    > I feel dumb asking because I know people live on much less, but we

    > have a 3 year old and a 1 year old and are struggling...I cut every

    > corner I can, but we are still really struggling. Any advice or

    > comments would be greatly appreciated.

    >

    > Jennifer

    >










  4. #4
    Maria Jewlz
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    It would be worthwhile for you to post your expenses,

    so that we can help you.





    --- crazigyrl_jen <jen@kittell.net> wrote:



    > I feel dumb asking because I know people live on

    > much less, but we

    > have a 3 year old and a 1 year old and are

    > struggling...I cut every

    > corner I can, but we are still really struggling.

    > Any advice or

    > comments would be greatly appreciated.

    >

    > Jennifer

    >

    >









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  5. #5
    libramommy66@brier.net
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    We live on about the same a yr. (32,000.00) and we struggle week to week

    too. We have only one more house payment and its ours..THANKFULLY...(we

    got a fixer-upper and were able to sell the house we just moved out

    of)...but we still struggle.. I have a 13yr old dd and a 16 yr ds...and

    I have to say the biggest problem I have is the grocery bill..cause

    these two eat ALOT..lol...believe me, you are NOT alone..

    But, we still have the usual bills, car, insurance ( that just about

    doubled cause of my 16 ds getting learners permit..lol), internet,

    groceries. The thing is we have no Credit Cards..But, the kids play

    sports yr round and that consumes alot of $$$ too...We just keep

    plugging along week after week..lol...Good luck and know that you are

    not alone..



    LaRae





    On 6/22/2007, "crazigyrl_jen" <jen@kittell.net> wrote:



    >I feel dumb asking because I know people live on much less, but we

    >have a 3 year old and a 1 year old and are struggling...I cut every

    >corner I can, but we are still really struggling. Any advice or

    >comments would be greatly appreciated.

    >

    >Jennifer

    >



    libramommy66






  6. #6
    Michele Sheriff
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    I know that you said that you cut everything that you could. But you would be suprise what you could live without. Without being sure of your situation this is just some ideas.... Don't eat out Cut cable tv Cut house phone or cell phone Plan meals then shop Like I said it is just a few ideas. Michele Sheriff

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  7. #7
    armstrca
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    <DIV dir="ltr" align="left"><SPAN class="032131714-25062007">See Liss's living on $40 a month link at her site (with the group http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/Budget101_/).
    <DIV dir="ltr" align="left"><SPAN class="032131714-25062007">Now her web site has great MYO recipes (www.budget101.com)







    From: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Budget101_@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of crazigyrl_jen
    Sent: Friday, June 22, 2007 3:37 PM
    To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: Budget101.com : budget for $32K a year?<SPAN class="032131714-25062007">
    <SPAN class="032131714-25062007">
    I feel dumb asking because I know people live on much less... I cut every<SPAN class="032131714-25062007">corner I can, but we are still really struggling. Any advice or<SPAN class="032131714-25062007">comments would be greatly appreciated.

    Jennifer



  8. #8
    dnawalker
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?



    <FONT face="Arial Narrow">It would help us to know what part of the country you live in and your fixed expenses. For example, we live in Columbus Ga and have an income of approximately 40,000 per year.We have four children,2, 4,5, and 12. Wehave a mortgage of $418 per month, pay electric bill budget billing of $116 per month....
    <FONT face="Arial Narrow">
    <FONT face="Arial Narrow">It would help people to know your situation a little better.
    <FONT face="Arial Narrow">

    <FONT face="Arial Narrow">April



  9. #9
    dbrpenny
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    There is a non-profit program called Angel Food Ministries that is

    available in many areas through local churches. Anyone (regardless

    of income, etc.) can purchase boxes of food for $25.00 per month.

    The food is valued at approx. $50 per box and includes frozen meats,

    dry food items, eggs, etc. The food is all first quality. You can

    purchase as many boxes as you like each month. They have a website

    you can check out by typing in their name.







    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, libramommy66@...

    <libramommy66@...> wrote:

    >

    > We live on about the same a yr. (32,000.00) and we struggle week

    to week

    > too. We have only one more house payment and its ours..THANKFULLY...

    (we

    > got a fixer-upper and were able to sell the house we just moved out

    > of)...but we still struggle.. I have a 13yr old dd and a 16 yr

    ds...and

    > I have to say the biggest problem I have is the grocery bill..cause

    > these two eat ALOT..lol...believe me, you are NOT alone..

    > But, we still have the usual bills, car, insurance ( that just about

    > doubled cause of my 16 ds getting learners permit..lol), internet,

    > groceries. The thing is we have no Credit Cards..But, the kids play

    > sports yr round and that consumes alot of $$$ too...We just keep

    > plugging along week after week..lol...Good luck and know that you

    are

    > not alone..

    >

    > LaRae

    >

    >

    > On 6/22/2007, "crazigyrl_jen" <jen@...> wrote:

    >

    > >I feel dumb asking because I know people live on much less, but we

    > >have a 3 year old and a 1 year old and are struggling...I cut every

    > >corner I can, but we are still really struggling. Any advice or

    > >comments would be greatly appreciated.

    > >

    > >Jennifer

    > >

    >

    > libramommy66

    >










  10. #10
    Trish Peterson
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    Well, hubby and I make a bit less than you together. Here's what I normally do to save money: 1. Shop garage sales and discount stores for clothes (goodwill, walmart) 2. Shop Walmart or ebay for music cds, computer games, and movies, I always research which is cheaper, it is usually ebay. 3. Shop at Aldi for most of my food and Super Walmart for the rest of it unless another store is either cheaper than them on sale or I have a gift card. Also we have a non-discount store across the street so if we just need a couple items we walk there and save on gas. Only do this if you live very close to a place, usually its cheaper to buy at discount stores. Especially if you make 1 or 2 big shopping trips a month. Also use coupons when you can. 4. For bath products (deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrushes,
    makeup, hair products, etc)
    I do Walgreens rebates. If you get the money back on your gift card they pay you an extra 10% so they always pay you to take stuff. And sometimes they have coupons on the items that are free on rebate then you get the price on the coupon back too. If your family uses soda or chef boyardee products those have been on rebate a number of times, I think there is candy and other food stuff on rebate too on occasion at Walgreens. Most of the Walgreens here have the booklets right by the sale ads in the store. I have heard Walgreens in other states do it different so check it out and ask the clerk if you can't find the booklets. 5. Your dryer raises your electric bill. I live in an apartment and while I dont directly pay electric on the dryer because they are coin operated...they do use electric and the more you use them the more wear goes on them. If you have the time
    then hang them outside. This can save you lots of money. I do my wash at mom's house and hang it up at her house whenever I can, she lets me use her washer for free if I hang it. I only use the coin machines in winter so she doesnt have to pay for her dryer for me to do my clothes. 6. Dollar stores sometimes have really good deals. I was at Dollar General (I think that was what it was called) expecting it to be a dollar store, everything wasn't a dollar but they had cheap stuff. 64 oz. of dish soap for $3 and kidney beans for 20 cents, those are great deals. 7. Dont be afraid to get help. You might be low income enough to get food stamps and qualify for the food pantry...I know hubby and I for sure without my income qualified for food stamps and the food pantry. We still use the food pantry sometimes but dont get food stamps. Also look into housing
    assistance in your area, and Medicaid health insurance. You can find out about most of this stuff at your local social security office. The workforce development center or unemployment office might have information for you about that too if you know where those are. 8. My mom is a huge frugal person and she is always raving about the new energy saver light bulbs. apparently she claims they cost initially but says she saves about $50 on her electric bill....funny mine has never costed more than $50.....I wont make any claims personally about this as I have yet to try the new bulbs....but my mom is a big fan of them Hope some of these ideas help you.
    herberkids3 <herberkids3@yahoo.com> wrote: <!-- Network content
    --> Well, for starters, it depends on the area you live in. I mean, someone
    making 32k a year can be considered really poor, or mid level middle
    class. If you live in an area where most people live in nice houses and
    drive expensive cars, and a typical grocery visit costs half a
    paycheck, then it's harder to do.

    Our family consists of an 11 yo, 8 yo, and 5yo, plus my husband and I-
    so 5 people. I'm a SAHM, and my husband just got a new job that pays
    35k a year, salary (meaning no over time). We had to relocate for the
    job, but not far.

    So far, the area we are in is cheaper in everything but our rent. We
    splurged BIG time on the
    apartment we went with. It has 4 bedrooms,
    though, plus ammenities such as a pool, tennis courts, basketball
    court, playground, a gym, and washer/dryer hook up's right in our
    apartment. The overall size of the apartment is just over 1500 square
    foot, so it's huge for an apartment. Additionally, it's about 400-500
    sq ft bigger than the house we previously rented. That said, the rent
    is $1015 a month (ouch- to me!), where as the house we rented was
    $775/mo. But, it includes the cost of gas (heat), which in the winter
    was running us $150-250 a month in the house, so that eats up some of
    the cost.

    Anyway, for our family, I do all the budgeting. It's not perfect, we're
    broke sometimes, but we're also at a point where we're actually making
    enough to NOT live paycheck to paycheck.

    Here's some idea's on corners to cut:

    Grocery- buy generics, and don't buy a bunch of extra stuff. If a brand
    name is on sale
    cheaper than generic, get that. What ever price is
    lowest, get it. Start including more side dishes with meals, and cut
    back on the cost & quantity of the overall main dish to cut cost. Use
    coupons. Shop loss leaders, fresh produce stands, and make meals from
    scratch.

    Utility bills- Unplug items not in use to conserve electricity: clocks,
    VCR's, radios- basically anything with so much as a light up display,
    because it is using electricity when not in use. Lower the wattage in
    many bulbs by 1 level, or get the spiral bulbs that use less wattage
    for the same amount of brightness. In the winter, lower the thermostat
    by 1 degree or 2 degrees, and wear warmer clothing. In the summer,
    raise it a degree or 2 and wear cooler clothing. Keep the curtains shut
    to avoid the sun heating the house up. On cooler days, open windows,
    and prop fans in them to keep the air off. Fill the freezer with water
    filled milk jugs so it
    uses less energy to keep items cool.

    Phone- Commit to 1 type, land line or cell phone. You don't need both.
    If you like the conveince of a cell, ditch the land line and save
    yourselve $20-100 a month.

    TV- Cut back on the cable plan you have, if you have one. Or on the
    satilight if you have that. Do you use all those channels? Call and see
    what smaller packages are offered, or make it sound like you plan to
    switch- they may offer you a better deal on what you currently have.

    Internet- If you don't spend all your time online, and currently pay
    $20 or more a month for DSL or cable internet, then cut the cost by
    going back to dial-up. You can get dialup for as low as $5 a month at
    some places. Your phone company, if you still have or plan to keep a
    landline, might have a special deal on it.

    Extra's, Entertainment, etc- Cut, cut, cut. Before renting a movie,
    before stopping off for burgers for dinner, before
    grabbing hair gel,
    pay the bills and get the groceries. From what is left after all that
    is done, make 2 piles: Allowance, Savings. put half the money left into
    a savings account, and half you can use as allowance. The allowance is
    for those little extra's that don't seem like much, but that add up-
    quickly!

    The savings account should be seperate from any accounts you have no.
    Put it into a bank you don't usually use, and decline the atm card.
    Make the money inaccessible, basically.

    I started an account like that back in February to save for vacation.
    Any extra money we get, plus some extra from our tax refunds, and we
    currently have over $1500 in it. I do a lot of stuff online, including
    a paid to do stuff site, a survey site, and a site that pays me to
    write articles. Any checks I get in the mail are deposited into that
    account. The lower amount checks are held onto until I have a few, then
    they are put
    into that account. I also save change and once my jar (an
    old spaghetti sauce jar) is full, I deposit it. Some of my change
    deposites have been close to $100 in and of themselves.

    The savings gives you a cushion, even if it's only $100. It can save
    you when you have car repairs, or when you need to get diapers, or
    there aren't enough groceries in the cupboards. Making it less
    accessible means you can't go on a Saturday night and draw money out to
    go see a movie. Or to grab enough out to get a lamp you like.

    The allowance money should be used for anything you don't -need-, but
    want: movie rentals, nights out, a new shirt, going through a drive-
    through, etc. It will make you think twice when you know on Monday, "I
    have $20 to get through to next Monday... do I really want to spend $5
    of that now on a cheeseburger meal??"

    More on entertainment: Find cheap or free entertainment such as
    spending the afternoon at
    the park with a frisbee from the dollar
    store, going to the beach for the day, watching an older movie on TV
    with a bowl of popcorn, reading a book from the library, etc.

    Another way to bring income in- have a yard sale. If you can make $100,
    it's still $100 you didn't have before, and you can stock up on
    groceries with it, to lessen the week to week burden. We stock up on
    things we eat alot when they are on sale, to avoid paying larger prices.

    My budgeting ways didn't come from a frugal up bringing. Now, my
    parents were not big spenders, they scrimped and saved every penny over
    the years. But I never had anything to do with it, so it wasn't
    something I really knew how to do.

    When I got married, my husband was a full time college student, working
    part time on campus, and full time summers on campus. Our first year
    married, he literally made just over $7,000. I was a stay at home mom
    right away due in part to
    high day care costs, and in part due to not
    knowing the area well. We supplemented our income by having him take
    out as much as he could when the school loans came around, so twice a
    year, we got boosts of around $2,000-3,000, and at tax time, we got an
    additional $4,000 back. So, while we DID only make $7k a year, we were
    bringing in up to $17,000 a year. Still, we lived -very- frugally. I
    remember one day we got into a fight (one of few, and likely our first
    one), and I walked around town for the day. It was near dinner time,
    and I was mad enough to spend the $5 in my pocket on a meal at KFC.

    I felt SO guilty about that, because I knew we had $15 total to last
    till our next paycheck, which was a week away yet, leaving us with just
    $10 after that meal. We never ordered out, we only rented cheap movies
    (new releases were a very special occasion), and we scrimped and saved
    when we could to do special things.

    We
    splurged when our big checks came in from taxes, & student loans,
    but even then, not much.

    Good luck! If you want to know more about any of my frugal ways, just
    ask or email me. I'd be happy to help a bit more.

    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "crazigyrl_jen" <jen@...> wrote:
    >
    > I feel dumb asking because I know people live on much less, but we
    > have a 3 year old and a 1 year old and are struggling...I cut every
    > corner I can, but we are still really struggling. Any advice or
    > comments would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Jennifer
    >




    <FONT face="times new roman" size="4"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 20pt;FONT-FAMILY: 'Script MT Bold';">
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  11. #11
    Herlean
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    I have changed almost all of our lightbulbs to the energy savers. True, they are pricey, but (1) keep the receipts. If they burn out before 5-8 years, the company will replace them for free. (2) They really do lower the electric bill.

    I do hang a good deal of laundry on the clothesline that we put up in our utility room. Especially my hubby's jeans, which can take forever to dry fully. That alone saves $$$$.

    I agree with the previous poster - it is not necessary to live on absolutely nothing, just make your money go farther for the items you do want to have. Everyone should have some of life's luxuries, but I am all for paying as little as possible for them.

    I have gone to eBay for some items and to Goodwill and thrift stores for others. Others, I go to retailers, but I do wait, save up the money, get the best price possible. Personally, I do all I can to avoid Wal-Mart. Just my personal thing, but if it is
    available ANYWHERE else, I will go there first.

    Herlean

    Trish Peterson <trishay79@yahoo.com> wrote: Well, hubby and I make a bit less than you together. Here's what I normally do to save money: 1. Shop garage sales and discount stores for clothes (goodwill, walmart) 2. Shop Walmart or ebay for music cds, computer games, and movies, I always research which is cheaper, it is usually ebay. 3. Shop at Aldi for most of my food and Super Walmart for the rest of it unless another store is either cheaper than them on sale or I have a gift card. Also we have a non-discount store across the street so if we just need a couple items we walk there and save on gas. Only do this if you live very close to a
    place, usually its cheaper to buy at discount stores. Especially if you make 1 or 2 big shopping trips a month. Also use coupons when you can. 4. For bath products (deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrushes, makeup, hair products, etc)
    I do Walgreens rebates. If you get the money back on your gift card they pay you an extra 10% so they always pay you to take stuff. And sometimes they have coupons on the items that are free on rebate then you get the price on the coupon back too. If your family uses soda or chef boyardee products those have been on rebate a number of times, I think there is candy and other food stuff on rebate too on occasion at Walgreens. Most of the Walgreens here have the booklets right by the sale ads in the store. I have heard Walgreens in other states do it different so check it out and ask the clerk if you can't find the booklets. 5. Your
    dryer raises your electric bill. I live in an apartment and while I dont directly pay electric on the dryer because they are coin operated...they do use electric and the more you use them the more wear goes on them. If you have the time then hang them outside. This can save you lots of money. I do my wash at mom's house and hang it up at her house whenever I can, she lets me use her washer for free if I hang it. I only use the coin machines in winter so she doesnt have to pay for her dryer for me to do my clothes. 6. Dollar stores sometimes have really good deals. I was at Dollar General (I think that was what it was called) expecting it to be a dollar store, everything wasn't a dollar but they had cheap stuff. 64 oz. of dish soap for $3 and kidney beans for 20 cents, those are great deals. 7. Dont be afraid to get help. You might be low income enough
    to get food stamps and qualify for the food pantry...I know hubby and I for sure without my income qualified for food stamps and the food pantry. We still use the food pantry sometimes but dont get food stamps. Also look into housing assistance in your area, and Medicaid health insurance. You can find out about most of this stuff at your local social security office. The workforce development center or unemployment office might have information for you about that too if you know where those are. 8. My mom is a huge frugal person and she is always raving about the new energy saver light bulbs. apparently she claims they cost initially but says she saves about $50 on her electric bill....funny mine has never costed more than $50.....I wont make any claims personally about this as I have yet to try the new bulbs....but my mom is a big fan of them Hope some of these ideas help
    you.
    herberkids3 <herberkids3@yahoo.com> wrote: Well, for starters, it depends on the area you live in. I mean, someone
    making 32k a year can be considered really poor, or mid level middle
    class. If you live in an area where most people live in nice houses and
    drive expensive cars, and a typical grocery visit costs half a
    paycheck, then it's harder to do.

    Our family consists of an 11 yo, 8 yo, and 5yo, plus my husband and I-
    so 5 people. I'm a SAHM, and my husband just got a new job that pays
    35k a year, salary (meaning no over time). We had to relocate for the
    job, but not far.

    So far, the area we are in is cheaper in everything but our rent. We
    splurged BIG time on the apartment we went with. It has 4 bedrooms,

    though, plus ammenities such as a pool, tennis courts, basketball
    court, playground, a gym, and washer/dryer hook up's right in our
    apartment. The overall size of the apartment is just over 1500 square
    foot, so it's huge for an apartment. Additionally, it's about 400-500
    sq ft bigger than the house we previously rented. That said, the rent
    is $1015 a month (ouch- to me!), where as the house we rented was
    $775/mo. But, it includes the cost of gas (heat), which in the winter
    was running us $150-250 a month in the house, so that eats up some of
    the cost.

    Anyway, for our family, I do all the budgeting. It's not perfect, we're
    broke sometimes, but we're also at a point where we're actually making
    enough to NOT live paycheck to paycheck.

    Here's some idea's on corners to cut:

    Grocery- buy generics, and don't buy a bunch of extra stuff. If a brand
    name is on sale cheaper than generic, get that. What ever price
    is
    lowest, get it. Start including more side dishes with meals, and cut
    back on the cost & quantity of the overall main dish to cut cost. Use
    coupons. Shop loss leaders, fresh produce stands, and make meals from
    scratch.

    Utility bills- Unplug items not in use to conserve electricity: clocks,
    VCR's, radios- basically anything with so much as a light up display,
    because it is using electricity when not in use. Lower the wattage in
    many bulbs by 1 level, or get the spiral bulbs that use less wattage
    for the same amount of brightness. In the winter, lower the thermostat
    by 1 degree or 2 degrees, and wear warmer clothing. In the summer,
    raise it a degree or 2 and wear cooler clothing. Keep the curtains shut
    to avoid the sun heating the house up. On cooler days, open windows,
    and prop fans in them to keep the air off. Fill the freezer with water
    filled milk jugs so it uses less energy to keep items
    cool.

    Phone- Commit to 1 type, land line or cell phone. You don't need both.
    If you like the conveince of a cell, ditch the land line and save
    yourselve $20-100 a month.

    TV- Cut back on the cable plan you have, if you have one. Or on the
    satilight if you have that. Do you use all those channels? Call and see
    what smaller packages are offered, or make it sound like you plan to
    switch- they may offer you a better deal on what you currently have.

    Internet- If you don't spend all your time online, and currently pay
    $20 or more a month for DSL or cable internet, then cut the cost by
    going back to dial-up. You can get dialup for as low as $5 a month at
    some places. Your phone company, if you still have or plan to keep a
    landline, might have a special deal on it.

    Extra's, Entertainment, etc- Cut, cut, cut. Before renting a movie,
    before stopping off for burgers for dinner, before grabbing hair gel,
    pay the
    bills and get the groceries. From what is left after all that
    is done, make 2 piles: Allowance, Savings. put half the money left into
    a savings account, and half you can use as allowance. The allowance is
    for those little extra's that don't seem like much, but that add up-
    quickly!

    The savings account should be seperate from any accounts you have no.
    Put it into a bank you don't usually use, and decline the atm card.
    Make the money inaccessible, basically.

    I started an account like that back in February to save for vacation.
    Any extra money we get, plus some extra from our tax refunds, and we
    currently have over $1500 in it. I do a lot of stuff online, including
    a paid to do stuff site, a survey site, and a site that pays me to
    write articles. Any checks I get in the mail are deposited into that
    account. The lower amount checks are held onto until I have a few, then
    they are put into that account. I also save
    change and once my jar (an
    old spaghetti sauce jar) is full, I deposit it. Some of my change
    deposites have been close to $100 in and of themselves.

    The savings gives you a cushion, even if it's only $100. It can save
    you when you have car repairs, or when you need to get diapers, or
    there aren't enough groceries in the cupboards. Making it less
    accessible means you can't go on a Saturday night and draw money out to
    go see a movie. Or to grab enough out to get a lamp you like.

    The allowance money should be used for anything you don't -need-, but
    want: movie rentals, nights out, a new shirt, going through a drive-
    through, etc. It will make you think twice when you know on Monday, "I
    have $20 to get through to next Monday... do I really want to spend $5
    of that now on a cheeseburger meal??"

    More on entertainment: Find cheap or free entertainment such as
    spending the afternoon at the park with a frisbee from
    the dollar
    store, going to the beach for the day, watching an older movie on TV
    with a bowl of popcorn, reading a book from the library, etc.

    Another way to bring income in- have a yard sale. If you can make $100,
    it's still $100 you didn't have before, and you can stock up on
    groceries with it, to lessen the week to week burden. We stock up on
    things we eat alot when they are on sale, to avoid paying larger prices.

    My budgeting ways didn't come from a frugal up bringing. Now, my
    parents were not big spenders, they scrimped and saved every penny over
    the years. But I never had anything to do with it, so it wasn't
    something I really knew how to do.

    When I got married, my husband was a full time college student, working
    part time on campus, and full time summers on campus. Our first year
    married, he literally made just over $7,000. I was a stay at home mom
    right away due in part to high day care costs, and in
    part due to not
    knowing the area well. We supplemented our income by having him take
    out as much as he could when the school loans came around, so twice a
    year, we got boosts of around $2,000-3,000, and at tax time, we got an
    additional $4,000 back. So, while we DID only make $7k a year, we were
    bringing in up to $17,000 a year. Still, we lived -very- frugally. I
    remember one day we got into a fight (one of few, and likely our first
    one), and I walked around town for the day. It was near dinner time,
    and I was mad enough to spend the $5 in my pocket on a meal at KFC.

    I felt SO guilty about that, because I knew we had $15 total to last
    till our next paycheck, which was a week away yet, leaving us with just
    $10 after that meal. We never ordered out, we only rented cheap movies
    (new releases were a very special occasion), and we scrimped and saved
    when we could to do special things.

    We splurged when our big checks
    came in from taxes, & student loans,
    but even then, not much.

    Good luck! If you want to know more about any of my frugal ways, just
    ask or email me. I'd be happy to help a bit more.

    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "crazigyrl_jen" <jen@...> wrote:
    >
    > I feel dumb asking because I know people live on much less, but we
    > have a 3 year old and a 1 year old and are struggling...I cut every
    > corner I can, but we are still really struggling. Any advice or
    > comments would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Jennifer
    >

    [/quote]


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  12. #12
    Amanda Graham
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    There is also a program called S.H.A.R.E that I have

    heard others in the more northern states mention,

    sorry, I'm not sure where you are. We have an Angel

    Food Ministries located near here that I go to

    occassionally. I generally shop loss leaders. Our

    Kroger always has something 10/$10. Last month, it

    was frozen veggies and salad dressings. I stocked up

    on both. Also, find out what day your grocery store

    does markdowns on bread, meats, etc. I can often by

    whole fryers for under $2, and occasionally buy ribs

    for around $5 a rack this way. They just need to be

    cooked or frozen that day. Also, meat will go further

    if you chop it and cook it in either a casserole or

    stir fry. For example, if I serve steak with baked

    potatoes and a veggie and a salad, my fiancee thinks

    he needs two whole steaks for himself. But I can chop

    1-2 steaks and stir fry w/ some veggies and that feed

    all three of us, usually with some leftovers. Buy as

    much of whatever you like that is on sale that week

    and plan meals around that. Soon you'll have a nice

    pantry built up. I started doing this in March. I

    have not been to the grocery except for perishables

    since the end of May, and still have enough left in my

    pantry and freezer for another month or two.

    BTW, even as I was stocking up, I my grocery budget

    was only $150 a month for 3 people. This includes

    paper goods and dog food also.

    hth,

    Amanda







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  13. #13
    crazigyrl_jen
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    sorry I have been missing since my post, but we had an emergency

    wedding to tend to. We live in Michigan. Our mortgage currently is

    $550 a month not including taxes and insurance. Our insurance

    (including cars) is $300 a month. we have electric which is roughly

    $80 a month, cable $25, phone $30, cell $70 (which is the business

    phone), water/trash $60, approximately $300 for gasoline...what am I

    missing? we line dry, collect rainwater, grow a garden, garage sale,

    borrow, barter, and do without a lot of things...I can't remember the

    last time I bought something new. we are having a garage sale this

    weekend, but we are also somewhat minimalist so there isn't much to

    sell. Thanks so much for your comments!



    Jennifer








  14. #14
    dnawalker
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?



    <<<Only $550 for a mortgage?!? Maybe I should move to Michigan! LOL..<<<
    <FONT face="Arial Narrow">
    Our mortgage is $418.13 in Columbus, Georgia with Tax and Insurance included. I do not live in a big, newhouse though. It is 4 bedroom 1.5 bath built in 1970 with about 1200 sq ft. Big back yard and nice,quiet neighborhood.
    <FONT face="Arial Narrow">
    <FONT face="Arial Narrow">
    <FONT face="Arial Narrow">April



  15. #15
    Jaimie Hering
    Guest

    Default budget for $32K a year?


    I live in Wis. too and our morgage is $432.00 a month.

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