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Thread: coupon myths

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    Senior Member Savin' Moola's Avatar
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    Default coupon myths

    More false impressions about coupons from Emily Brown, the
    self-proclaimed coupon queen.

    I can't afford to donate food to charity.
    Coupons allow you to stockpile food if you buy a lot when it's on
    sale, Brown said. Store it for yourself, or send it to the elementary
    school or Scout troop for the holiday food drive.
    A helpful hint with stockpiling: Cereals are usually cheapest
    during February and March, so buy what you'll need then and you won't
    have to buy more for a year!

    I don't have time to match the sales with the coupons.
    If you are organized enough, Brown said, you'll recognize when the
    sales and coupons correspond. And organization saves you time anyway.

    Only poor people use coupons.
    Actually, according to a study done last year, more than 80
    percent of households with annual incomes of $50,000-$80,000 reported
    using coupons. The lowest level of reported coupon use came from the
    lowest income bracket.
    "Spending the extra money for the newspaper is worth it," Brown
    said. "You'll save much more than you'll spend."

    It's cheaper to just buy store brands and use my discount card.
    Brown said you can get national brands for half of what the store
    brands cost, if you use coupons right.
    I don't have time to go to all the different stores.
    You don't need to go to every store every week, Brown said,
    because the sales cycle. For example, if chicken is $1.50 per pound at
    Smith's this week, it will most likely be on sale for $1.50 (or maybe
    $1.48) at Albertsons next week.

    Some false impressions about coupons from Emily Brown, the
    self-proclaimed coupon queen.

    I'll never use the products the coupons are for.
    Even if you don't eat processed foods, you can use coupons for
    milk, yogurt, healthy cereals, cheese, peanut butter, pasta, rice, fruit
    juices and even non-food items, such as cleaning supplies, Brown said at
    a recent workshop.

    It takes too much time to clip and organize coupons.
    "If anybody tells you it doesn't take time to clip coupons,
    they're lying to you," Brown said. "But it doesn't have to take too much."
    Save time by clipping in bunches (if you have duplicate ads), then
    sorting in binders by category and expiration date. And don't clip every
    coupon. Brown said if you wouldn't use the product for free, don't clip
    the coupon.

    It isn't worth it to use coupons to save 20 cents or 30 cents.
    You really can save with those "cents off" coupons, Brown said.
    Besides, in 2003, the average face value of coupons was 93 cents, and 7
    percent of coupons had a face value over $2.
    I'd have to subscribe to a newspaper to get the coupons.
    "All you have to do is find the coupon on the Internet and print
    it off," Brown said. Some Web sites she suggests are http://www.boodle.com
    (there's a coupon for $2 off Simple Green cleaner, for example, which
    Wal-Mart sells for $1.97), http://www.save.com and http://www.coupon.com.
    Or, if your friends and neighbors don't use their coupons, ask if
    you can have them. Otherwise, they'll just go to waste.

    Louise Davis <lulu@lgcy.com>
    laweeze141802

  2. #2
    Senior Member Savin' Moola's Avatar
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    I had to laugh when I read this...my dad is the "King" of coupons. He does the
    grocery shopping not my mom. He was an accountant so he is very organized. He
    prides himself on all the deals he get with his coupon shopping. He buys when it
    is on sale & at a store that doubles or triples coupons. At times the item is
    either FREE or he gets money back because the cost of the item is less than what
    the coupons is for.

    Louise Davis <lulu@lgcy.com> wrote:
    More false impressions about coupons from Emily Brown, the
    self-proclaimed coupon queen.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Savin' Moola's Avatar
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    Re: coupon myths


    I am an avid coupon user. We only use national brand product in our house (we use to use almost all store brands). But now w/ coupons I ALWAYS get the national brand for less. I save an average of 60% each month on grocery & non-grocery items w/ a family of 5. Clipping/organizing coupons does take time, I average about 1 hr. per week to clip, sort & file in my binder system (which I got from http://www.smartspendingresources.com). I will normally do this early in the morning before everyone wakes up so I'm not disturbed or while I'm watching TV. If you don't think you can save money and get more for less, I recommend giving it a "serious" try for 1 month. You will be amazed.

    Kristina Harrell
    Willow Spring, NC

    Romans 8:31
    ..... If God be for us, who can be against us?

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