electric bill- Budget101 Discussion List

i live in the state of ny. i check my bill online i was lloking and they have a section with energy saving programs. we have one that they will ome to ur house and turn on ur stuff and see if it uses to much energy and if it does u have to replace it a no cost. this works for both homeowners

bee, border, check, company, conservation, energy, hat, hope, idea, information, live, online, programs, question, saving, state, stuff, table, text, works, renters, electric, bill, landlords, thing, permission, [non-text, http://www.lipower.org/commercial/conservation.html, helps, portions, message, removed], website, section, lloking, replace, cost, turn, house, homeowners

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Thread: electric bill

  1. #1
    prnena71@aol.com
    Guest

    Default electric bill



    i live in the state of ny. i check my bill online i was lloking and they
    have a section with energy saving programs. we have one that they will ome to ur
    house and turn on ur stuff and see if it uses to much energy and if it does u
    have to replace it a no cost. this works for both homeowners and renters. the
    only thing renters need to do is get permission from the landlords. here is
    my electric company website with the information in question. so u can have
    an idea what to look for. I hope this helps.
    http://www.lipower.org/commercial/conservation.html


    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


  2. #2
    DMarieCM@aol.com
    Guest

    Default electric bill





    our house is over 3500 sq ft and it is all electric - water heater, heat pump, everything... our level billing is $124 (we just moved here in June) but I KNOW we are going to have a huge catch up because the people we bought the house from were a retired couple and we are a large family of 7!

    Any ideas on cutting the electric bill? We do have a wood burning fireplace but no access to free wood. I have asked on freecycle even. Does anyone know how the cost of buying firewood compares to the savings on the electric bill?

    Thanks for any help!
    Danielle



  3. #3
    wildirishrose299@aol.com
    Guest

    Default electric bill


    Where do you live that you don't have access to firewood?










  4. #4
    ~trina~
    Guest

    Default electric bill




    <font size="2" color="navy" face="Arial" id="role_document">If you were in S CA ,I have lots of wood for
    yu! ( a tree just fell in my backyard)

    I would think wood would still be cheaper
    than electricity, wouldn’t it? find a local boy scout org that may sell
    it,etc~trina~


    -----Original Message-----

    From: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com
    [mailto:Budget101_@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
    Of
    DMarieCM@aol.com

    Sent: Friday, December 29, 2006
    2:18 PM

    To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com

    Cc:
    BudgetHomemaking@yahoogroups.com

    Subject: Budget101.com : electric
    bill



    <font size="2" color="black" face="Arial">10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black;">our
    house is over 3500 sq ft and it is all electric - water heater, heat pump,
    everything... our level billing is $124 (we just moved here in June) but
    I KNOW we are going to have a huge catch up because the people we bought the
    house from were a retired couple and we are a large family of 7!


    <font size="2" color="black" face="Arial">10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black;">


    <font size="2" color="black" face="Arial">10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black;">Any
    ideas on cutting the electric bill? We do have a wood burning fireplace
    but no access to free wood. I have asked on freecycle even. Does anyone
    know how the cost of buying firewood compares to the savings on the electric
    bill?



    <font size="2" color="black" face="Arial">10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black;">


    <font size="2" color="black" face="Arial">10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black;">Thanks
    for any help!


    <font size="2" color="black" face="Arial">10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black;">Danielle


    <font size="2" color="white" face="Arial">10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:<span width="1"><font size="2" color="black" face="Arial">10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black;">




  5. #5
    Danielle
    Guest

    Default electric bill


    well I am in Ohio - and I can get seasoned firewood for about $85 a

    cord which is fairly cheap around here. I just don't know how it

    compares to how much it will help our electric bill. We are in an

    oversized tri-level, and the fireplace is on one end of the main level.



    Also looking for regular ideas of cutting back the electric bill. Does

    anyone have a list like that? Like 1) turn out the lights (I know that

    one - LOL)

    Danielle








  6. #6
    dlawn@comcast.net
    Guest

    Default electric bill


    we have a few drafty windows, particularly the big bay window in the living room. Every year, my husband puts that plastic window covering over these windows and the difference is immediately noticable. Where before the plastic, especially on a windy day, we'd set the temp at 68 or 70 and it would still seem cold. Now we set it 65 and sometimes almost feels too warm. With the temps in the 50s and low 60s lately, we've been able to turn the heat off during the day! Thats our best tip.

    <BLOCKQUOTE style="BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid;">-------------- Original message --------------
    From: "Danielle" <DMarieCM@aol.com>




    well I am in Ohio - and I can get seasoned firewood for about $85 a
    cord which is fairly cheap around here. I just don't know how it
    compares to how much it will help our electric bill. We are in an
    oversized tri-level, and the fireplace is on one end of the main level.

    Also looking for regular ideas of cutting back the electric bill. Does
    anyone have a list like that? Like 1) turn out the lights (I know that
    one - LOL)
    Danielle





  7. #7
    dmmckellep2002
    Guest

    Default electric bill


    Here are ways we save on electric.

    1 wash clothes in cold water and hang out to dry

    2 burn wood, we find trees that have blown down, ask and cut it.

    Clean up very well and usually they will recommend you to someone

    else.

    3 turn off lights and unplug all electrical stuff that does not need

    to be reset.

    4 turn down your water heater and put a heater blanket on it.

    5 handwash dishes instead of running dish washer or only use it when

    full

    6 turn off coffee pot instaed of letting it stay on. the heater uses

    energy.

    7 replace bulbs with low watt bulbs, they cost more but last longer

    and do use less energy

    8 call your electric company and ask for a free enrgy audit. Most

    have them, they come out and measure the amount of heat being lost at

    windows, and many other tips. Mine also provided free low energy

    light bulbs.



    Last Nov, we had a $300 electric bill, this past Nov it was $81. When

    my husband lost his job, we had to find many ways to cut our costs.

    Marsha








  8. #8
    Karen Pennington
    Guest

    Default electric bill


    The electric bill is always something to master around here.



    We lowered the temp on the hot water heater. You might make two adjustments

    a year, we seem to need it a little hotter in the winter than summer.



    We have the thermostat on a timer. We generally are up till about 11 but the

    thermostat goes into night mode at 10 (it seems to encourage our night owl

    teens to go to bed too.) I am up at 5:45, the rest of the gang at 6, which

    is when the heat revs up. Down again when we are out the door and up for the

    kids coming home from school. I close the drapes on the North side of the

    house and leave at least a couple on the south side open for the cat to sun

    herself. We learned from vet bills!



    I cook a lot of full meals in the oven, meat and veggies. Although heating

    up the oven is expensive there is usually 2 or 3 meals there. The microwave

    is used to heat those.



    I keep my freezer full with food or water jugs. It holds the cold when you

    open it up Air you will jist keep reheating each time. And I have ice in the

    jugs for camping too.



    We are switching to the more effecient corkscrew type light bulbs and have

    installed floresents where possible.



    The biggest difference we made last year was adding 12 inches of insulation

    to the attic. It has just about paid for itself in the 15 months we have had

    it.



    Next we are working saving to replace doors and windows. That will make a

    big difference. We also are thinking of siding. You have to save in all

    places so credit is NOT an option on this.



    Take care



    Karen










  9. #9
    wildirishrose299@aol.com
    Guest

    Default electric bill


    Check local free or low cost news papers for people offering free fire wood.

    Remember you can't just use any wood. No painted or stained wood because of

    toxic fumes. Also avoid Pine it's extremely sappy and will clog the flue.

    Also a good tip is to make sure you have decent seals around your windows and

    doors. New caulking around the windows and doors is really cheap and easy

    to do yourself and it will help drastically with drafts.










  10. #10
    Vickie Anderson
    Guest

    Default electric bill


    Schedule the times that you run your washer, dryer & dishwasher. Anytime between 8 p.m. & 8 a.m. are the cheapest times. I run my dishwasher during the night after we go to bed. I'll start a load of clothes at 8 p.m.Good luck.

    Danielle <DMarieCM@aol.com> wrote: well I am in Ohio - and I can get seasoned firewood for about $85 a
    cord which is fairly cheap around here. I just don't know how it
    compares to how much it will help our electric bill. We are in an
    oversized tri-level, and the fireplace is on
    one end of the main level.

    Also looking for regular ideas of cutting back the electric bill. Does
    anyone have a list like that? Like 1) turn out the lights (I know that
    one - LOL)
    Danielle




    &#32;_____________________________________________ _____

    Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the
    best spam protection around



  11. #11
    Chris Drake
    Guest

    Default electric bill


    Are you able to change any of your utilities to gas?We live in Canada

    and we find it cheaper than electricity.We had all electric 30 years

    agoand even then,it was too much.We have a wood burning fireplace,but we

    don't use it unless it's really cold,but it helps.Our house is 2100

    sq.ft. and our kids left last fall,so it took 2 months to notice a

    difference and our kids used a lot of water and





    other utilities.You don't realize until they leave how much they used.I

    think we pay more in Canada for our utilities from what I have seen of

    what Americans pay.We may have the health benefit here,but we pay dearly

    for everything else.We have such long times for surgery here,my husband

    waited over a year for gallbladder surgery and he was so sick.Chris






  12. #12
    tamlynedwards
    Guest

    Default electric bill


    My husband sells firewood here in NY. He gets good money for it

    because there is alot of work in cutting trees, using a wood

    splitter, loading and unloading it several times and paying his

    helper. But if a cord of wood lasts you a couple months burning

    everyday and costs you say $200, depending on where you live, then

    it might save you in the long run. If you can get your own wood, the

    better. The only cost would be your time, gas for chainsaw and a

    truck to haul it.



    > -----Original Message-----

    > From: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com

    [mailto:Budget101_@yahoogroups.com] On

    > Behalf Of DMarieCM@...

    > Sent: Friday, December 29, 2006 2:18 PM

    > To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com

    > Cc: BudgetHomemaking@yahoogroups.com

    > Subject: Budget101.com : electric bill



    > Any ideas on cutting the electric bill? We do have a wood burning

    > fireplace but no access to free wood. I have asked on freecycle

    even.

    > Does anyone know how the cost of buying firewood compares to the

    savings

    > on the electric bill?

    >

    >

    >

    > Thanks for any help!

    >

    > Danielle

    >










  13. #13
    tumorfarmer
    Guest

    Default electric bill


    To keep electric bills low, these are some of the tips we have used

    for the last nineteen years.



    Install ceiling fans!!!

     (unless you are in a rental- then just use room fans) choose fans

    with the SWITCH that reverses fan blade direction to take advantage

    of the scientific fact that heat rises, and cold sinks (whether it is

    in liquids, solids, or gasses). In the summer, just having the air

    movement feels cooler, so set the fans at their highest speed

    setting. If you have air conditioning, set the switch so that the

    blades pull the air up from the ground and into the fan. Because

    cold air sinks, this will draw the cooler air conditioned air up and

    mix it with the warmer upper air, making the entire room feel

    cooler. Fans on high speed in every large room can make the house

    feel as much as 5 to 10 degrees cooler, so you can set the thermostat

    5 degrees higher and still enjoy more comfort, with less electricity

    being used on air conditioning. The ceiling fans use much less

    electricity than either a heat pump or air conditioner

     In the winter, set fans at lower speed, and switch the fan blade

    direction so that the warm air (heat rises, cold sinks) that collects

    at the ceiling is pushed down to where you are, so you don't have to

    turn the thermostat up as high. If you use a wood stove or wood

    stove insert in a fireplace, ceiling fans or room fans can be used to

    push the warm air throughout the house.



    Heavy insulated curtains or shutters-

     These can make a HUGE difference in your electric bill as well as

    your comfort level in the house. Keep them closed during the hottest

    part of the days in the summertime, and on cold days unless the

    windows let sunshine in to warm the house. The first time I put

    these up, I was shocked that the cold breezes that always seemed to

    blow across the floors finally stopped, and I was comfortable for the

    first time in the winter. I did not have air conditioning back then

    either, so they made a HUGE difference in keeping the indoor

    temperature cool in the summer also!



    Switch to energy efficient light bulbs-

     Compact fluorescent bulbs fit standard size light bulb sockets and

    provide more light for a fraction of the energy expended and can be

    purchased in various light colors. (make sure to read directions-

    some cannot be used in enclosed light fixtures.)

    Clean or replace your furnace or air conditioner filter every 30

    days!

     A plugged filter makes the furnace or a/c work harder and longer,

    as well as causes extra wear and tear that causes them to break down

    sooner.

    Unplug appliances when they are not in use!

     When the US was suffering from power shortages a few years ago,

    Idaho Power Company sent all subscribers a newsletter that explained

    that all appliances that are plugged in use a small amount of power

    even when they are not turned on, and recommended that they all be

    unplugged when not in use.

     Use smaller televisions, and turn them off when not in use. The

    bigger they are, the more power they use, and they heat up

    contributing to the need for the air conditioner to run more.

     Do not run the clothes dryer too long, and choose the temperature

    most appropriate for the fabrics of the clothing you are drying.

    Example: perma-press and synthetic fiber clothing need a lower

    temperature setting to appear their best. Even cotton t-shirts look

    less wrinkly when dried on a lower temperature. If you hang them up,

    you do not need them to be comletely dry, and they will look much

    smoother and neater if hung up when they are approximatley 95% dry.

     Get rid of the extra freezer or refrigerator if possible unless it

    is an energy efficient appliance. I found that as much as $25.00 a

    month in power can be drawn by these extra appliances. If you need

    to keep the extra fridge or freezer to keep your food budget down,

    remember to keep the freezer full. A full freezer retains its'

    coolness better with less energy. Even if you have to freeze milk

    jugs of water that are only full to allow for the expansion of the

    ice, it saves electricity.

    Summertime-

     To save the most money, of course you can do without air

    conditioning. Having a shady porch or screened porch can be a great

    way to escape the heat, as can deciduous shade trees which shade the

    house in the summer when they have leaves, but when they drop their

    leaves in the winter allow sunshine to warm the house. There are,

    however, many people with health problems who MUST use air

    conditioning if they want to remain alive, so - remember that many

    elderly or people with chronic health problems waves die every year

    during heat. If you fit into those categories, please do NOT stop

    using your air conditioning. For everyone else, during the daytime,

    never turn the Air Conditioning thermostat to lower than 75 degrees

    if you can help it. Only if it is physically impossible to sleep at

    75 degrees, experiment with turning the temperature down one degree a

    night below 75 until you are able to sleep well enough to work the

    next day. Obviously the higher you keep the thermostat set, the less

    money you will spend on electricity for air conditioning.

     If you live in a dry climate, install a swamp cooler which adds

    moisture to the air, cooling it down. If you live in a moist

    climate, install a dehumidifier

     Wear lighter weight clothing to sleep in, and remember that cotton

    sheets that breathe, or woven satin sheets feel cooler than flannel

    sheets and blankets in summer. The same holds true for comfortable

    sleepwear in hot weather.

     Cook dinner in the microwave instead of heating up the house with

    the big oven. Some countertop microwave/convection ovens can be

    purchased relatively inexpensively and are not only a quicker way to

    cook, but save energy, as well as not heating the house as much on

    hot days, so the A/C doesn't have to run as much. I found a

    Tupperware Stack Cooker for $5.00 at a garage sale, and it is a great

    way to cook 3 things all at once.

     When boiling water or pasts, put a lid on the pot. It holds the

    heat in so it gets hotter faster, with less energy because the heat

    cannot escape, so it builds inside the pan quicker.

     Turn hot water heater down 10 degrees if at all possible (if you

    use a lot of hot water, this may not be okay. Also check your

    dishwasher manual to make sure it will still be able to function

    properly with cooler water. Some dishwashers heat their own water,

    others need hot water from the hot water heater.)

     Hang laundry out to dry if you have time and a place you can do

    it. If you live in a subdivision with a Homeowner's Association and

    have rules or even city laws against hanging laundry outside, use a

    folding rack inside the house to let the clothes dry. As moisture

    evaporates out of the clothes, it can also help cool the air a

    little, just like a humidifier.

     Schedule your baking so that you only have to heat the oven once-

    if you are making muffins and cookies, fix them one right after

    another, so you don't have to heat the oven up twice.



    Wintertime-

     Keep the thermostat set for 65 daytime and if you like it colder at

    night, set it for 60 (or what actually works for you).



     You can always wear flannel or sweat-type fabric pajamas, and/or

    use more blankets at night, and wear a sweater during the day to

    remain comfortable indoors.



     Hot chocolate and warm soups and stews also make your body

    temperature stay up, so you can actually ENJOY these foods and

    beverages without having to strip down to summer clothing after you

    eat!



     Dress in layers so that you can adjust your clothing throughout the

    day depending on your activity level, since more activity leads to

    higher body temperature.



     If using wood-burning fireplace or stove or stove insert to heat

    home, clean your chimney EVERY year to avoid house fires, or use CSL

    logs to dry out chimney-fire causing creosote and tar buildup. (the

    ad just ran on tv as I was posting regarding wood-burning home

    heating, so I was actually able to remember what it was called!)










  14. #14
    Kanette
    Guest

    Default electric bill


    Check with your electric company before you do this, where I live it is the same 24/7 unfortunately!!


    ----- Original Message ----
    From: Vickie Anderson <vickieanderson18@yahoo.com>
    To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Saturday, December 30, 2006 5:15:42 PM
    Subject: Re: Budget101.com : electric bill





    Schedule the times that you run your washer, dryer & dishwasher. Anytime between 8 p.m. & 8 a.m. are the cheapest times. I run my dishwasher during the night after we go to bed. I'll start a load of clothes at 8 p.m.Good luck.

    Danielle <DMarieCM@aol. com> wrote:

    well I am in Ohio - and I can get seasoned firewood for about $85 a
    cord which is fairly cheap around here. I just don't know how it
    compares to how much it will help our electric bill. We are in an
    oversized tri-level, and the fireplace is on one end of the main level.

    Also looking for regular ideas of cutting back the electric bill. Does
    anyone have a list like that? Like 1) turn out the lights (I know that
    one - LOL)
    Danielle





    ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __


    http://mail. yahoo.com



  15. #15
    Marie Elena ChaCha
    Guest

    Default electric bill




    Hi Chris,


    Where in Canada are you from, I was born in Nova Scotia, and we do alot of camping in Ontario and New Brunswick.
    For our bills (electric and gas) we got on the budget billing program, which is good, same payment year round and then credited for excess non usage.


    Marie Elene
    Southeast Michigan


    <BLOCKQUOTE style="BORDER-LEFT: #a0c6e5 2px solid;"><FONT style="FONT-SIZE: 11px;FONT-FAMILY: tahoma,sans-serif;">
    <HR color="#a0c6e5" SIZE="1">
    From: Chris Drake <cdrake@rogers.com>
    Reply-To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com
    To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: Budget101.com : Re:electric bill
    Date: Sat, 30 Dec 2006 19:43:42 -0500



    <DIV id="ygrp-msg">



    Are you able to change any of your utilities to gas?We live in Canada
    and we find it cheaper than electricity.We had all electric 30 years
    agoand even then,it was too much.We have a wood burning fireplace,but we
    don't use it unless it's really cold,but it helps.Our house is 2100
    sq.ft. and our kids left last fall,so it took 2 months to notice a
    difference and our kids used a lot of water and

    other utilities.You don't realize until they leave how much they used.I
    think we pay more in Canada for our utilities from what I have seen of
    what Americans pay.We may have the health benefit here,but we pay dearly
    for everything else.We have such long times for surgery here,my husband
    waited over a year for gallbladder surgery and he was so sick.Chris


    <hr> Dave vs. Carl: The Insignificant Championship Series. Who will win?


 

 
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