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  1. #1
    Liss@budget101.com
    Guest

    Default Ethnic Inexpensively; April Column!!!


    Are you in the mood for a change of pace? Perhaps another taste of the Far East
    will whet your appetite! If Szechuan cuisine suits your fancy, Chengtu Chicken
    is worth the time. On the side, consider Yaki Mushrooms, from Japan, and you'll
    have a feast fit for a king, for company, and most definitely for your family!
    This is not a hot dish,
    as Szechuan is known for, but it does have a kick for those who aren't
    accustomed to much spice in their diet. If you're one of those, on the other
    hand, who are looking for hot, double the hot bean sauce or Szechuan chili
    sauce, and it will probably fit your
    needs.
    I'm going to do something a bit different this time, and offer the chicken
    recipe with breast meat to serve four, or the whole chicken to serve six to
    eight. My brother Gerard Petitte, who offered the Yaki Mushroom recipe, omitted
    the number of servings for this dish; but on the side of Chengtu Chicken, one
    pound of mushrooms should
    easily serve 8. Thanks to Jerry (Gerard) for his contribution toward this issue
    of Ethnic Inexpensively. I hope you'll enjoy this special tastebud treat.


    Chengtu Chicken



    Serving 4
    2/3 lb boned, skinned chicken breasts, cut into bite-sized pieces

    Serving 6-8
    1 whole chicken, boned, skinned, with wings sectioned into three
    segments, and cut into bite-sized pieces

    Marinade:
    Serving 4
    1 tsp rice wine or dry sherry
    1 Tbsp Superior soy sauce
    1 egg white
    Serving 6-8
    1 Tbsp rice wine or dry sherry
    1.5 - 2 Tbsp Superior soy sauce
    1 egg white

    1. Mix chicken pieces with marinade ingredients, and set aside 20 minutes.
    ================================================== ========
    2. Blend Seasoning sauce ingredients in separate bowl and set aside:
    Serving 4
    1 tsp rice wine or dry sherry
    1 Tbsp Superior soy sauce
    1.5 tsp sugar
    1 tsp rice or white vinegar
    2 Tbsp chicken broth
    2 tsp oyster sauce
    1 tsp cornstarch blended with 2 Tbsp water
    1/4 tsp each salt and pepper (salt can be garlic salt)

    Serving 6-8
    1 Tbsp rice wine or dry sherry
    1.5 - 2 Tbsp Superior soy sauce
    1.5 tsp sugar
    1.5 tsp rice or white vinegar
    1/4 cup chicken broth
    1.5 Tbsp oyster sauce
    1 Tbsp cornstarch blended with 4 Tbsp water
    1/4 tsp each salt and pepper (salt can be garlic salt)
    ================================================== ========
    In still another container (a cup size will do), blend the following according
    to servings:

    Serving 4
    1 tsp chopped fresh ginger root
    1 Tbsp chopped fresh garlic
    1 Tbsp chopped fresh green onion
    1 Tbsp hot bean sauce or 1 Tbsp washed, salted preserved black
    beans and 1 tsp Szechuan chili garlic sauce

    Serving 6-8
    1.5 2 tsp chopped fresh ginger root
    1.5 - 2 Tbsp chopped fresh garlic
    1.5 - 2 Tbsp chopped fresh green onion
    2 Tbsp hot bean sauce or 2 Tbsp washed, salted preserved black
    beans and 2 tsp Szechuan chili garlic sauce
    ================================================== ========
    3. If you're using the wings in this dish, cook the wings about 10 minutes
    before adding the rest of the chicken. Heat about 1/4 cup of oil in the wok
    over medium heat, and stir fry the wings. When they are golden on each side and
    appear done, add the rest of the chicken pieces and stir fry, about 1 minute, if
    breast meat only, and about 5 minutes, if you're using the entire chicken. When
    the chicken pieces are fully cooked, remove them from the
    oil.

    4. Add spinach to hot oil according to servings noted below, and stir fry. If
    fresh, the spinach will take about 3 minutes. If you use frozen spinach, you
    will need to work to loosen the spinach with a fork while it's cooking, but this
    should not take more than 8 minutes. You still want to retain the fresh taste
    and will need to avoid overcooking it.

    Serving 4
    2/3 lb fresh spinach or 1 package frozen (fresh is, of
    course, better, but in a pinch, frozen will work)

    Serving 6-8
    1.5 lb fresh spinach or 2 packages frozen (as explained
    above, frozen will work in a pinch)
    ================================================== ========
    Serving 4
    1 tsp sesame oil

    Serving 6-8
    1.5 - 2 tsp sesame oil

    ================================================== ========
    5. Remove spinach from wok, and arrange in a circle on a serving platter.
    ================================================== ========
    6. Add ginger root-garlic-green onion-hot bean sauce mixture to oil in wok.
    Add 1 more tablespoon of oil to wok, if you feel it needs to be added. Stir-fry
    until fragrant, about 1 minute.

    7. Return cooked chicken to wok, and add seasoning sauce, mixing well.
    Stir-fry until sauce begins to thicken. Add sesame oil, mix quickly, and place
    finished chicken with sauce in the center of the spinach ring on the platter.

    8. Serve with white rice.




    Yaki Mushrooms




    1 pound of fresh mushrooms, cut into pieces
    1 teaspoon chopped garlic
    1 teaspoon of sesame oil
    2 Tbsp soy sauce
    cooking oil.

    1. Pour cooking oil on a paper towel and coat the inside of a frying pan
    2. Heat frying pan over a moderate heat
    3. Add soy sauce, sesame oil , and chopped garlic.
    4. Stir/mix for a few seconds.
    5. Add mushrooms and saute until finished
    6. Serve.

    And what better to top a feast like this than a bowl of cool and refreshing
    orange wedges? Till next time, a hearty bon appetit!




    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


  2. #2
    magwrit1
    Guest

    Default Re: Ethnic Inexpensively; April Column!!!


    Hi everyone,




    Recent disturbing threads on some *other* lists have brought to mind
    that I probably should have included my copyright line on the Ethnic
    Inexpensively, April Column. This column is exclusive to the
    Budget101 family. If you plan to share my column with anyone, please
    take time to add my copyright (you can copy and paste, or if you
    prefer, press on the ALT key and simultaneously--on the number pad to
    your right--press 0169 to create the sign and just type the rest).
    The ingredients to a recipe are not copyrightable, but the directions
    are, as is the entire column, which includes the recipe. Thank you.




    2003 Michelle Young




    Warmly,


    Michelle




    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "Liss@b..." <liss@b...> wrote:


    > Are you in the mood for a change of pace? Perhaps another taste of
    the Far East will whet your appetite! If Szechuan cuisine suits your
    fancy, Chengtu Chicken is worth the time. On the side, consider Yaki
    Mushrooms, from Japan, and you'll have a feast fit for a king, for
    company, and most definitely for your family! This is not a hot dish,


    > as Szechuan is known for, but it does have a kick for those who
    aren't accustomed to much spice in their diet. If you're one of
    those, on the other hand, who are looking for hot, double the hot bean
    sauce or Szechuan chili sauce, and it will probably fit your


    > needs.


    [snipped for brevity]


  3. #3
    Poppy
    Guest

    Default Re: Ethnic Inexpensively; April Column!!!


    Goodness I hope that wasn't me! I've always made certain to credit
    you but never thought about the , hehe I learned a new thing. Poppy

    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "magwrit1" <magwrit1@e...> wrote:
    > Hi everyone,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Recent disturbing threads on some *other* lists have brought to
    mind
    > that I probably should have included my copyright line on the
    Ethnic
    > Inexpensively, April Column. This column is exclusive to the
    > Budget101 family. If you plan to share my column with anyone,
    please
    > take time to add my copyright
    [snipped for brevity]


  4. #4
    psalm119_89
    Guest

    Default Re: Ethnic Inexpensively; April Column!!!


    Michelle,
    Could you tell us more about copyrighting recipes? I thought it was
    interesting that you said the ingredients can't be copyrighted, just
    the directions (and the column in your case). I have wondered about
    recipes sometimes in this regard. For example, our homeschool group
    is wanting to publish a cookbook as a fundraiser for our group. Can
    we include recipes that we use from cookbooks? Do we need to adapt
    them some in order to do that? Also, I wonder about my own recipes
    that I have developed if I include them in the book--will the company
    that publishes the cookbook then be able to use them? I know that the
    publisher that we were maybe going to use has lots of recipes on their
    website, which I assume came from other community cookbooks. Should I
    include and my name in the notes of the recipe? I haven't ever used
    my recipes in a way to make money, but I have sometimes considered
    publishing a small booklet of them to try to make a little money.

    Thanks for any help you can give! (This is my first post, although I
    have been subscribed for a month or so.)

    Bonnie in NC

    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "magwrit1" <magwrit1@e...> wrote:
    > Hi everyone,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Recent disturbing threads on some *other* lists have brought to mind
    > that I probably should have included my copyright line on the Ethnic
    > Inexpensively, April Column. This column is exclusive to the
    > Budget101 family. If you plan to share my column with anyone, please
    > take time to add my copyright (you can copy and paste, or if you
    > prefer, press on the ALT key and simultaneously--on the number pad to
    > your right--press 0169 to create the sign and just type the rest).
    > The ingredients to a recipe are not copyrightable, but the directions
    > are, as is the entire column, which includes the recipe. Thank you.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > 2003 Michelle Young
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Warmly,
    >
    >
    > Michelle


  5. #5
    Michelle Young
    Guest

    Default Re: Ethnic Inexpensively; April Column!!!


    Bonnie in NC writes:
    <<Michelle,
    <<Could you tell us more about copyrighting recipes? I thought it was
    interesting that you said the ingredients can't be copyrighted, just
    the directions (and the column in your case).>> <snip>
    <<Can we include recipes that we use from cookbooks? Do we need
    to adapt them some in order to do that? Also, I wonder about my own
    recipes that I have developed if I include them in the book--will the
    company that publishes the cookbook then be able to use them?>>
    <snip>
    <<Should I include and my name in the notes of the recipe?>>

    Hi Bonnie, and welcome to the list,

    Copyright issues seem to make the rounds of various lists about
    once a year, and I guess this is the case again this year since this
    is literally the third time in two weeks that I've posted to a list on the
    subject! lol

    Please understand I'm not a lawyer, and an intellectual properties
    attorney who is knowledgeable on these laws could answer with
    far more clarity and understanding of this subject than I can.
    *However,* here's what I wrote to another list just yesterday:

    "I need to speak up here as an award-winning author and
    editor. <snip> I didn't mean to offend or to cause anyone to be
    insulted; but as a published writer whose words have indeed been
    plagiarized, I know what that feels like to have copyright infringement
    occur. <snip>

    Now, that said, I would like to clarify about copyright infringement
    because I think there's a misperception going on here. First of
    all, while a recipe itself--including the ingredients list--cannot be
    copyrighted, the *directions* to that recipe most certainly *can* be
    and *are* copyrightable. The ingredients are not.

    Technically, one's writing is copyrighted even if one hasn't gone
    through the *formality* of applying for copyright protection. The
    laws are tricky, however, and electronic rights and hard copy
    rights are now buzz words in the professional writing community,
    thanks to Tasini vs NYTimes, <http://www.nwu.org/tvt/tvthome.htm>.
    There are also various kinds of copyrights. The author of a short
    story that appears in an anthology might wish to copyright that
    story, but at the same time, the publisher will copyright the entire
    anthology in which the story appears. As a result, there are, in
    essence, two copyrights on that story, as I understand it. The
    same would hold true for an individual author's recipe directions
    that went into a cookbook if that author chose to exercise those
    rights. But again, *not* the ingredient list.

    I'm not an attorney, however. I'm a professional writer and editor.
    You can find out more on copyrights and what they can and can't
    do at the following USA government sites:
    http://www.loc.gov/copyright/
    http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ1.html
    http://www.copyright.gov/title17/

    Now, since you're developing a cookbook, you might consider a
    few things along the way:

    1. If there is any opportunity to have the cookbook judged in
    competition, you get points for creating the recipe ingredients in
    such a way as to parallel the recipe directions themselves. For
    example, if you need to add milk, then butter, then eggs to a
    recipe, make sure they are put in that order in the ingredient list.

    2. If you've adapted a recipe from a cookbook, but you've
    *modified* the recipe itself (actually changed the ingredients, or
    quantities), you might at least consider giving credit to the cookbook
    that initially had the idea, but it's *not* a violation of copyright if you
    don't *providing* you've rewritten the directions in your own words.

    3. Put in some tips throughout the pages to spice the pages and
    encourage their being read.

    4. Add some anecdotes to the recipes...where they came from,
    any special family occasions where they've been traditionally
    served.

    5. Since it's going to be a cookbook created by homeschooling
    families, why not have a splash of the children's art work throughout
    the book, and perhaps even a collage for the front cover? Then
    you'll have a book truly created out of memories. You can even
    enhance this idea by adding the children's perceptions of how to
    make brownies, pasta, and so on (no fair cheating and using those
    already circulating the Internet! lol).

    Good luck with the cookbook, and I hope this gives you some
    ideas to make the experience even more worthwhile. I also hope
    this has answered your questions, Bonnie.

    Warmly,
    Michelle


 

 

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