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  1. #1
    magwrit1
    Guest

    Default rice noodles and more


    Hi Poppy and all,

    First, let me reassure you and Mickey, I'll post the Sour Cream
    Coffee Cake hopefully within the next 24 hours. I'm pressed on
    deadlines for these books that *must* be done this month, so I
    don't have a lot of time, but I'll try to get it in. I promise.

    Next, the rice noodles. Yes, it's true rice noodles soak up a lot
    of liquid, but there most certainly *are* times you need to soak
    them!!! There are several varieties of rice noodles, btw, from
    the Mai Fun and Sai Fun threads to the Chow Fun broad noodles.

    I make Chow Fun, for instance, by soaking the noodles. It's a
    *must*. Take a small amount of *semi-frozen* uncooked beef
    (chuck is fine, but cut off any excess fat)--a pound will make a
    full meal, but if you want just a snack, you can use less--and
    slice it *thin* with a very sharp knife. You slice it frozen because
    it's easier to get it to the thinness you need for this dish.
    Marinate
    it in a little corn starch, Superior soy (you can use Mushroom soy
    if you'd prefer), a splash of rice wine if you have it, a *small*
    amount (perhaps a teaspoon) of oil, and if you're using as much
    as a pound of meat, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon of sugar.
    Mix well and let it sit 10 minutes.

    I do this recipe in my electric frying pan because I feel like I have
    better control over it, but you can do it on the stove top if you'd
    prefer. Add a little oil to the pan, getting the oil to sizzling
    (add a
    couple of drops of water to the oil to make it easier), and add the
    beef at once. I like to add a couple of cloves of minced garlic as
    well. Stir fry about 2 or 3 minutes. *Don't* remove from the pan.

    Add the soaked Chow Fun rice noodles, and stir fry. If you prefer
    this dish with less sauce, you're going to have to watch carefully,
    or the rice noodles will stick. I use a spatula to do this particular
    dish so I don't break up the noodles. Add a little soy sauce and a
    healthy amount of oyster sauce (sorry, but I don't measure for this
    dish at all because it's more of a feel for what's right and tasty...
    you'll see), and continue to stir fry till hot, palatable to your
    taste
    buds, and has the right amount of sauce you want. I prefer ours
    dry, so there is little sauce beyond what's there. If you want yours
    with a sauce, what's called wet, you'll want to add more oyster
    sauce and some water blended with corn starch.


    That's really all there is to it. A bag of Chow Fun noodles, in our
    home, never goes past 3-4 servings, and many times, I'm sorry I
    haven't bought a second bag. They're certainly cheap enough.
    Here, they run about 79 cents a bag. If you want, you can slice
    some scallions for contrasting color and additional flavor.

    Hope that clarifies the rice noodle question, and in the meantime,
    I'm getting back to work. Again, I'll send the Sour Cream Coffee
    Cake recipe shortly. Oh, and Poppy, I just don't have the time to
    put in for more columns than I do right now. If my personal and
    professional plans work out the way I'm hoping in the coming year,
    perhaps then; but I try to consider Liss' schedule also. Thanks
    for the compliment though.

    Warmly,
    Michelle


  2. #2
    Poppy
    Guest

    Default Re: rice noodles and more


    Hmmmm....perhaps my rice noodles are not "fun"? This bag says they
    are a medium rice stick, Pad Thai noodle, (Banh Pho) What do I have??

    Plus, as I mentioned, I purchased the black soy sauce. Last night I
    decided on stir fry and I marinated my chicken in a little of the
    black soy sauce, along with an egg white and some sherry (sweet, out
    of the dry). Being one of those people who are always tasting a new
    food first, I squirted a bit on my finger and was very surprised to
    discover it was very thick and very sweet. The bottle doesn't say,
    does it need refrigerated? Poppy

    Anxiously awaiting the Sour Cream Coffee Cake....


  3. #3
    Michelle Young
    Guest

    Default Re: rice noodles and more


    Poppy writes:
    <<Hmmmm....perhaps my rice noodles are not "fun"? This bag says
    they are a medium rice stick, Pad Thai noodle, (Banh Pho) What
    do I have??>>

    lol! You have rice noodles. In Chinese, they're "fun;" they're Banh
    Pho in Vietnamese.

    <<Plus, as I mentioned, I purchased the black soy sauce. Last
    night I decided on stir fry and I marinated my chicken in a little of
    the black soy sauce, along with an egg white and some sherry
    (sweet, out of the dry). Being one of those people who are always
    tasting a new food first, I squirted a bit on my finger and was very
    surprised to discover it was very thick and very sweet. The bottle
    doesn't say, does it need refrigerated? Poppy>>

    Do you remember I said black soy was especially good for fried
    rice? Now you're seeing why the different varieties of soy sauces.
    Each has a purpose. There are many sauces in Chinese cooking,
    Poppy--bean sauces, garlic sauces, chili sauces, soy sauces,
    and some are multipurpose while others are single purpose. Black
    soy is good in fried rice, but there are reasons you want it for other
    dishes. It is why I'm so precise in my recipes when I tell you to use
    Superior or light soy versus any other.

    Black soy--thick soy as well--are both indeed very thick and very
    sweet in contrast to the more salty and thinner Superior or light
    soys. But even Superior and light soy don't contain the massive
    quantities of Americanized soy sauces you'll find at the grocery
    store. Kikkoman tends toward Superior, but the flavor is quite
    different from Superior and it's not as multipurpose in Chinese
    cooking.

    You don't need to refrigerate the soy sauces, although some
    people prefer doing so. Oyster sauce I would definitely
    recommend refrigerating.

    The next time you try to marinate the chicken, work with a
    three-dry, three-wet base: cornstarch-sugar-salt, soy-wine-oil.
    You'll find it a wonderful marinade that will suit many uses in
    stir-frying. For stir frying as you've described, I usually use a
    slice of ginger root and some chopped garlic to start the
    process of seasoning the pan.

    Hope that helps.

    Warmly,
    Michelle


 

 

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