low income housing- General Budget & Finance

i am needing information on the ins and outs of low income housing if anyone knows anything about them please contact me thanks

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  1. #1
    maria
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    i am needing information on the ins and outs of low income housing if

    anyone knows anything about them please contact me

    thanks








  2. #2
    Vickie
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    All I know is what a friend told me. There is Section 8 which is, the rent is based on your income.Check with the county where you live, some cities also have their own Section 8. There is usually a waiting list (she waited 2 weeks) Good luck.

    maria <secretwindow-jd1@sbcglobal.net> wrote: i am needing information on the ins and outs of low income housing if
    anyone knows anything about them please contact me
    thanks




    &#32;
    Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. [/url] "] Try it now.[/url]


  3. #3
    Erica_Cain_of_last_names
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    I am new to the group & would luv to know where somewhere waited only

    2 weeks to receive section 8.I am in Orlando Florida & was on the

    waiting list 10 yrs!Got married & quit renewing my name on the list

    after that.

    Thanks

    Margo





















    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, Vickie <vickieanderson18@...>

    wrote:

    >

    > All I know is what a friend told me. There is Section 8 which is,

    the rent is based on your income. Check with the county where you

    live, some cities also have their own Section 8.

    > There is usually a waiting list (she waited 2 weeks) Good luck.

    >

    > maria <secretwindow-jd1@...> wrote:

    > i am needing information on the ins and outs of low

    income housing if

    > anyone knows anything about them please contact me

    > thanks

    >

    >

    >

    >

    >

    >

    > ---------------------------------

    > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile.

    Try it now.

    >










  4. #4
    Tressa Watts
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    I live in Washington and there is several brand new duplexes in town that have remained empty for ages. I have seen ads on the conveneince stores in town for people to apply. They cant seem to fill them. We have alot of migrant workers in town so that is what they were built for initially but they still arent full so they have opened it up to any low income....I cannot imagine why they are not full. they are nice and have the nicest playground in town.
    Tressa



    To: Budget101_@yahoogroups.com
    From: mro1010@yahoo.com
    Date: Mon, 17 Dec 2007 03:52:01 &#43;0000
    Subject: Re: Budget101.com : Low income housing





    I am new to the group & would luv to know where somewhere waited only
    2 weeks to receive section 8.I am in Orlando Florida & was on the
    waiting list 10 yrs!Got married & quit renewing my name on the list
    after that.
    Thanks
    Margo

    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, Vickie <vickieanderson18@...>
    wrote:
    >
    >
    All I know is what a friend told me. There is Section 8 which is,
    the rent is based on your income. Check with the county where you
    live, some cities also have their own Section 8.
    > There is usually a waiting list (she waited 2 weeks) Good luck.
    >
    > maria <secretwindow-jd1@...> wrote:
    > i am needing information on the ins and outs of low
    income housing if
    > anyone knows anything about them please contact me
    > thanks
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > ---------------------------------
    > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile.
    Try it now.
    >



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  5. #5
    stargazer43008
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, Vickie <vickieanderson18@...> wrote:

    >

    > Hi! Low income housing is 1/3 of your gross income.Like for example,

    if you make $1,800 a month gross , your rent will be $600.lisa








  6. #6
    Melinda Wells
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    I have lived in low income housing before. Many times your utilities

    like gas and electric are included with the percentage of rent. The

    downside is few low income housing units allow pets and you are not

    allowed guests except for a couple weeks a year. Another thing to think

    about is that they are hard to get in and you have to put up with

    monthly house inspections. This is to make sure you are keeping the

    house or apt clean and have no forbidden pets or guests. If you do an

    eviction will surely follow. Finally, one more reason I would not go

    this route again is that often low income housing is located in

    unfavorable sections of town and you are going to live around the

    desperately poor who include many trouble makers. Low income housing

    sounds great, but it is little more than concentration camps for the

    poor. This is why I live in a 21 foot camper in an RV park rather than

    a 2 bedroom house in a public housing unit. I almost forgot, they

    include ALL forms of income like tax returns, when figuring your rent

    and you are only allowed one or two vehicles and if you have things

    like a boat or camper or sometimes even computers (New York) then these

    count against you as well. Just food for thought.

    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, "stargazer43008"

    <stargazer43008@...> wrote:

    >

    > --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, Vickie <vickieanderson18@> wrote:

    > >

    > > Hi! Low income housing is 1/3 of your gross income.Like for

    example,

    > if you make $1,800 a month gross , your rent will be $600.lisa

    >










  7. #7
    jillk2136@aol.com
    Guest

    Default Low income housing





    In a message dated 12/18/2007 7:22:14 A.M. Central Standard Time, stargazer43008@yahoo.com writes:
    Low income housing is 1/3 of your gross income

    Wow that sounds incredibly high to me. We don't live in low income housing but there is NO WAY we could afford to pay 1/3 of our gross income for rent!


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  8. #8
    tammyco5@aol.com
    Guest

    Default Low income housing





    In a message dated 12/19/2007 7:09:34 A.M. Central Standard Time, jillk2136@aol.com writes:
    <FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent;" face="Arial" color="#000000" size="2"><FONT face="Arial" color="#000000" size="2">
    Wow that sounds incredibly high to me. We don't live in low income housing but there is NO WAY we could afford to pay 1/3 of our gross income for rent!


    What is the max amount of what you take home,(net I guess?) should go to your mortgage or rent?

    Tammy


    See AOL's top rated recipes and easy ways to stay in shape for winter.



  9. #9
    ro so
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    Twenty years ago I lived in low income housing and when my mom was looking for a place it didn't look like they changed the way they figure the rent. It is 30% but it is figured after certain deductions--with me they took my child care off so it lowered my income alot. I think I was making around $1400 gross and ended up only paying $34 in rent after the child care,20% taxes (if working) and the other deductions. This was for me and 3 children. When my Mom looked into them they also said that they would take off her medication and her part B premium. Becky

    jillk2136@aol.com wrote: In a message dated 12/18/2007 7:22:14 A.M. Central Standard Time, stargazer43008@yahoo.com writes: Low income housing is 1/3 of your gross income Wow that sounds incredibly high to me. We don't live in low income housing but there is NO WAY we could afford to pay 1/3 of our gross income for rent!


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  10. #10
    tammyco5@aol.com
    Guest

    Default Low income housing





    In a message dated 12/19/2007 7:07:47 A.M. Central Standard Time, moon_goddess129@yahoo.com writes:
    sounds great, but it is little more than concentration camps for the
    poor. This is why I live in a 21 foot camper in an RV park rather than
    a 2 bedroom house in a public housing unit. I almost forgot, they
    include ALL forms of income like tax returns, when figuring your rent
    and you are only allowed one or two vehicles and if you have things
    like a boat or camper or sometimes even computers (New York) then these
    count against you as well. Just food for thought.


    My friend lives in an RV and I'm considering it. We may have to sell our house and with bad credit, where do you go? How much did you pay for your RV?

    Tammy


    See AOL's top rated recipes and easy ways to stay in shape for winter.



  11. #11
    candice hagen
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    It is high but I always make a means to an end. You know what I mean.

    jillk2136@aol.com wrote: In a message dated 12/18/2007 7:22:14 A.M. Central Standard Time, stargazer43008@yahoo.com writes: Low income housing is 1/3 of your gross income Wow that sounds incredibly high to me. We don't live in low income
    housing but there is NO WAY we could afford to pay 1/3 of our gross income for rent!


    <FONT style="FONT: 10pt ARIAL, SAN-SERIF;COLOR: black;"> See AOL's top rated recipes and easy ways to stay in shape for winter.


    &#32;
    Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. [/url] "] Try it now.[/url]


  12. #12
    melinda irvin
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    I found mine on Ocala4Sale.com . It was basically in good shape, just needed cleaned up and a little work done to it to suit my family. We are still customizing it. You would not believe what we have inside this thing! Three computers (2 are desktops), three game systems, a medium size fridge, a small freezer, microwave, bed area with TV and dvd player for my daughter, age 3 as well as a bed area for my husband and I. We keep all our clothes inside, all our electronics, a coffee pot, mircowave, etc. and have room for 2 cats, 4 birds, a dog and all of us too! When you go for a camper to live in try and get the biggest value for your money but make sure it is structurally sound first. Cosmetics can be changed easily, but a rusted out frame is trouble! We put a new floor in ours along with a new kitchen (remodeled to suit our needs) and a new toliet ( old one was a shortie). We paid only $700 for ours but it is very comfortable for us plus we have a storage tent for a
    shop for my husband beside the camper. It is very cheap, tags cost about $20 a year, no seperate insurance is needed as most car insurances automatically cover it when it is being towed. A extra piece of mind would be to purchase RV insurance, not to expensive but worth the money. Our lot, which is 52 feet deep and 43 feet wide costs us $330 a month. This includes electric, sewage and water. We have lake assess plus can take part in any camp activities we choose. Our camp is even gated! Lawn care is included and garbage pick up is free and done daily. Where else in Florida could you live more cheaply? There are cheaper parks than ours, some farther south toward Tampa as well. If you are a senior or your spouse is over 55 you may qualify for an "over 55 park". These aregreat places, very quiet and the rent is often less than $200 a month and some include phone and cable for that price as well as lake access!

    tammyco5@aol.com wrote: In a message dated 12/19/2007 7:07:47 A.M. Central Standard Time, moon_goddess129@yahoo.com writes: sounds great, but it is little more than concentration camps for the
    poor. This is why I live in a 21 foot camper in an RV park rather than
    a 2 bedroom house in a public housing unit. I almost forgot, they
    include ALL forms of income like tax returns, when figuring
    your rent
    and you are only allowed one or two vehicles and if you have things
    like a boat or camper or sometimes even computers (New York) then these
    count against you as well. Just food for thought.
    My friend lives in an RV and I'm considering it. We may have to sell our house and with bad credit, where do you go? How much did you pay for your RV? Tammy


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    shape</A> for winter.


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  13. #13
    melinda irvin
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    I am a stay at home mom right now. I go to school online working for a Master in Business Admin degree but mostly take care of my husband and daughter, both of whoom are disabled. We live on his check which is $521 a month. We do not get food stamps, the idots either lose our paperwork or tell us he makes too much! I have learned other ways to put food on the table such as food pantries, freecycle ( yes, they do give away oranges, groceries and gift cards at times!), and we catch fish from the lake. Plus our park usually has three or four pot luck dinners a week and we can go eat all we want for free if we like. The people are very kind here and everyone looks out for everyone else. It is a different class of people than those found in public housing. Sorry, I do not mean to slam public housing because there were times I had to stay there and I would rather be there than in a homeless shelter, but I would rather have my camper as either of the above choices. The great
    thing is that one day I will again have a house, but I will never sell my camper. Want to know why? Because as long as I have a camper I will never be homeless and having lived in one once, I know I could do it again if the need arose. One thing to keep in mind is although it is great to get a large camper, make sure the vehicle you have can tow it! There is a reason for this besides the unlikely event you got evicted (once in a blue moon every million years), but if a hurricane came you could hook up your home and like a turtle take it with you and not have to lose anything. In other words if your truck will pull a 21 foot camper loaded down, do not buy a 30 foot one! There are also other advantages to a small camper, your lot is bigger! Some campgrounds, like ours, will allow you to be permanent and if you get a permit you can build around your camper and in essence make a "house" out of it. Some people here keep adding on and a small
    camper like ours could grow to be three bedrooms plus a sunroom, BUT it will always be a camper for insurance reasons. The bad thing is campers deperciate, the good thing is very few creditiors will fool with an older camper because they are not worth as much to resale. If you did this you would be in a place permanently though, make sure this is what you want first before making your camper into a house.

    tammyco5@aol.com wrote: In a message dated 12/19/2007 7:09:34 A.M. Central
    Standard Time, jillk2136@aol.com writes: <FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent;" face="Arial" color="#000000" size="2"><FONT face="Arial" color="#000000" size="2"> Wow that sounds incredibly high to me. We don't live in low income housing but there is NO WAY we could afford to pay 1/3 of our gross income for rent!
    What is the max amount of what you take home,(net I guess?) should go to your mortgage or rent? Tammy


    <FONT style="FONT: 10pt ARIAL, SAN-SERIF;COLOR: black;"> See AOL's top rated recipes and easy ways to stay in shape for winter.


    &#32;



  14. #14
    herberkids3
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    When we lived in subsidized housing, our rent was 33% of our income.

    Honestly, if you can't afford that much, then likely there are bills

    you have that are not considered 'needs', as that isn't all that

    much. By needs, I mean food, water, electricity, and gas, not cell

    phones, cable, internet, car payments, etc.



    We actually pay out more than we should, but we when we relocated,

    we wanted to find a nice neighborhood, with large apartments, in a

    good school district. We managed to get all three, but we do pay

    around 47% of our take home for the apartment ($1,045 a month, which

    includes heat, and 2 car ports. In the spring, we'll go back down by

    $30/month when we no longer need 2 car ports).



    Most financhial advisors will tell you not to pay more than 40% of

    your income towards the actual housing- ie: rent, or mortgage. That

    doesn't mean things like insurance, or taxes.



    Low income housing by HUD is based on federal poverty guidelines.

    Most subsidized housing units in my area will rent to low income who

    don't qualify, but they still have an income cap. For instance, the

    place we rented from did subsidized, but if you are there and go

    over the subsidization cap, you could stay. For our family of 4, we

    couldn't make more than 28k, though, to stay.



    That was several years ago, so the limit has likely gone up a bit,

    but the guidelines themselves are the same still. We did end up

    getting rather taken advantage of when we moved into that HUD

    townhouse, though, but it was due to the management there, not HUD.

    They estimated 33% of our income to be almost $200. About 6 months

    after we moved in, HUD came in to do random audits of all the

    subsidized units.



    They randomly chose ours, and we got knocked from $187/month to

    $92/month, and had rent paid up for several months after that due to

    the refund they issued. After they found that 8 of the 10 unites

    were being over charged, they audited the entire complex.



    They found that younger people were being over charged 2 to 1 over

    middle aged and older tennents. For instance, my MIL lived in the

    same complex, and they found she wasn't paying enough per month.

    Only by around $10/month, but she had her rent raised, as did a few

    others, where as most of the younger tennents got theirs lowered.



    Needless to say, the manager in charge was no longer in charge. She

    was an older lady who did not like kids, for starters, and hated

    dealing with people when they called or stopped by. She also wore

    roughly 4 bottles of perfume at any given moment.





    Now, aside from HUD, some states have a Housing Commission which

    will also help you out with low-income rent. The place where we

    rented had a max and minimum amount of rent for the subsidized

    tennents. I think the high end was around $500/month, but the low

    end was only $50/month.



    I had a neighbor who was a single mom, and she had just started

    college. She applied through HUD, and got approved for $50/month,

    then took the approval to MSHDA (The michigan housing commission,

    basically), and they gave her a grant towards housing, as well.

    Basically, she paid out $3/month for rent. Yep, $3.



    Apartments that accept HUD can also set a range of rent, based

    usually on how new and nice the place is. Because apartments set

    their own base rent, hud doesn't control the minimum rent at any

    place. But, if they feel it IS too high, they simply won't allow

    subsidization at that rental unit.



    Over the past few years, our old town saw a hike in subsidized

    developments. When we lived in HUD, we had 2 places in town to

    choose from, both built in the late 60's, neither in nice

    conditions, etc. We simply signed up for both, and went where we

    were accepted first.



    But in the past 5 years, 3 or 4 brand new complexes went up for

    subsidized housing. All are nice, and hey, brand new doesn't hurt,

    but the down side is the base rent is expensive. My MIL moved into a

    3 level, 3 bedroom GORGEOUS townhouse. She was the very first

    tennent in that townhouse. Her income is very limited, plus she has

    her useless, jobless daughter, and her grand daughter there, as

    well. They got the cheapest base rent, which is still $285/month- a

    large hike from the place where we all lived years ago, whose

    minimum was $50/month.



    I guess what I'm saying is that not all subsidized housing units are

    created equal, and not all will offer you the same rent. It IS based

    on 33% of your income, but if their absolute lowest minimum is above

    that, you'll be paying more than that 33%.



    It can be a godsend, though, because the rent still is cheaper than

    even the most basic of efficency apartments out there.



    --- In Budget101_@yahoogroups.com, tammyco5@... wrote:

    >

    >

    > In a message dated 12/19/2007 7:09:34 A.M. Central Standard Time,

    > jillk2136@... writes:

    >

    > Wow that sounds incredibly high to me. We don't live in low

    income housing

    > but there is NO WAY we could afford to pay 1/3 of our gross income

    for rent!










  15. #15
    sweetelle_99
    Guest

    Default Low income housing


    I worked my way out of low income housing. I am a single partent who

    lived in a scattered site home for 15 years and ran into many issues

    with the housing authority trying to overide the state laws regarding

    landlord tenant rights. Many a time we went to small claims court,

    where they ended up embarrassed and losing thier shirts. When I

    finaly got to the point where I had finished college, found a good

    job as a legal assistant and was able to purchase the home I now live

    in, they tried to sue me for $3000 dollars in damages that did not

    exist. Keep in mind I moved in 90 then there wa remodel to abate the

    older houses of asbestas in 95 and I continued to live there passing

    inspections every year with flying colors through 2003. After 8 years

    the courts considered it normal for a house to need new paint etc.

    Again they lost thier shirts.



    Then again in your area things might be entirely differant. I would

    go to the local office and ask for as much information as you can on

    the programs available. Read it very carefully and make sure you

    understand what you are getting into. Keep in mind there are wait

    lists and can be up to 2 or 5 years in length. Its up to you to keep

    up with the things they require and keep every piece of paper you get

    from them.



    If done correctly, low income housing can be a helping hand up, but

    nine times out of ten it doesnt end up that way. I was one of the

    lucky ones.



    Good Luck!

    Elle












 

 
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