Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Creator & Designer of Budget101.com
    Join Date
    Jan 1995
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    3,407
    Blog Entries
    191
    Downloads
    51
    Uploads
    245

    Default Article: Dirt Cheap Gardening

    Bringing Dirt Cheap back into play- how to get free fertilizer, seeds, cheap weed control and pest control recipes and tips

    Read More: Article: Dirt Cheap Gardening
    ~Liss~
    Creator & Designer of
    www.Budget101.com
    www.GroceryBudget101.com
    Budget101 Forums
    KitchenMixGifts.Budget101.com

    *Newbies*
    Forum How To Guide

    **The happiest people are not those with the best or the most of everything, The happiest people know how to make the best of everything they have.**

  2. #2
    Ground Level Lurker
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    2
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    If you have old pantyhose, don't throw them out. Cut them into 1" strips and use them to tie up tomato plants. They will stretch as your plants grow and won't damage the stems. Also, at the end of the season I take these used strips and set them in a pile next to my birdbath ... the birds pick them up in the spring and use then in thier nest-building efforts.

  3. #3
    Ground Level Lurker
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    texas
    Posts
    1
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    I practice square foot gardening and grow organically. i found one of the best investments i have made is in raising a dozen chickens. I gather the eggs, and the manure from chickens can be added right into garden without composting. The chickens are great at pest control, and help keep the soil turned.

  4. #4
    What's a Budget?
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Eastern Washington
    Posts
    6
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    We have gotten large quanities of chipped tree branches and leaves free from the tree trimmers that are working in our neighborhood. We let it sit from spring to spring in order for it to break down. Leaves actually take 2 years to compost in our area but it makes wonderful mulch in the mean time. If I want faster compost I put some in black garbage bags and keep it damp with weekly turnings and will have compost in about 3 months.

  5. #5
    What's a Budget?
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    West Springfield, MA
    Posts
    7
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    I wish I could do the "free fertilizer" trick. My husband and I are both disabled and not allowed to drive due to seizures (sheesh, who would have thought back when we were in our 30s this would happen?). So we can't take fertilizer on a bus! Plus, it is in our lease we cannot compost (landlord wouldn't care but apparently in the past there was some problem with smell, which means they weren't doing it right!). We are really trying to figure out how to do this without killing ourselves or breaking our lease! (Sssh, he thinks our new dog is our old dog who was "grandfathered in" under our lease, LOL). We've lived here almost nine years so we don't want to move! In fact, when we became disabled, he moved us from the third floor to the first in the same building (he owns several) when the apartment became available. That's why we can even garden, it's the only apartment with "dirt" LOL. If anyone can come up with cheap ways to get our expensive dirt suitable for growing, we'd appreciate it!

  6. #6
    Ground Level Lurker
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    1
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Dirt Cheap Gardening

    Quote Originally Posted by Madeupagin View Post
    I wish I could do the "free fertilizer" trick. My husband and I are both disabled and not allowed to drive due to seizures (sheesh, who would have thought back when we were in our 30s this would happen?). So we can't take fertilizer on a bus! Plus, it is in our lease we cannot compost (landlord wouldn't care but apparently in the past there was some problem with smell, which means they weren't doing it right!). We are really trying to figure out how to do this without killing ourselves or breaking our lease! (Sssh, he thinks our new dog is our old dog who was "grandfathered in" under our lease, LOL). We've lived here almost nine years so we don't want to move! In fact, when we became disabled, he moved us from the third floor to the first in the same building (he owns several) when the apartment became available. That's why we can even garden, it's the only apartment with "dirt" LOL. If anyone can come up with cheap ways to get our expensive dirt suitable for growing, we'd appreciate it!
    I have found that saving and using the cooled water from boiling eggs for my husband and watering my fruits and veggies with that does wonders for them! I am sure if you like your eggs scrambled or fried that boiling the cracked shells and using that water would help also, just make sure the water is cooled before using. I hope this works for you as great as it does for us!

  7. #7
    Ground Level Lurker
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Mohave Desert
    Posts
    1
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    I use a wormbin in the kitchen for all of my veg/fruit garbage. They are easy to make from plastic totes and cost less than $10. for the supplies. Just add the cost of worms and go! There are plans all over the internet for them.
    Worm tea made from the castings is awesome for the soil!

  8. #8
    What's a Budget?
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Sparta, WI
    Posts
    9
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Dirt Cheap Gardening

    There are more ways to skin a cat than you can imagine!!! There are many PLANTS that you can easily grow as natural soil improvers. You could grow peas or beans that do not require especially rich soil to trive and they naturally add nitrogen to the soil. When they are done growing, instead of just pulling them out dig them back into the soil and they will add organic matter and nitrogen. Comfrey is another plant that can be grown and cut low when it gets tall and dig into the soil but be warned! Do not dig up or pull comfrey or you will have a spreading nightmare on your hands. It only takes a small piece of the root for a new plant to grow, but comfrey adds a lot of organic matter and ( I think it's calcium but I'm not sure anymore). Look online for natural soil building plants and use them to slowly improve your soil. You can also compost in place. Simply pick a spot that you don't plan on using lay down the plant material you want to compost in a "sheet" instead of a pile and cover it with weed barrier fabric. Noone will know you are composting. Well good luck and happy gardening.Hope my spelling was OK

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •